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Really, I've wired two houses from the ground up as the self-contractor when I built. Obviously there's an extremely safe way to do it since I've been doing it for over 20 years and never had a problem. Maybe the correct reply would be to acknowledge that, but as I have admitted it's not for everyone because there is an inherent danger in working with electricity. There's some people that simply don't have the aptitude to perform such operations safely. These are the same people that shouldn't be driving cars or owning guns. As a member of this form I would think that you would be a proponent of individual liberty and freedom rather than being a safety nanny. Anyhow, the correct order of operations is to turn off the individual appliance breakers in the fuse box followed by the main power breaker that runs power into the entire house. Plug in the generator and start it up. Select the appropriate house appliance breakers and turn them on. Whatever you do, don't turn on the main house breaker while the generator is running. It's the reverse order of operations when you're ready to flip back to city power. Really, really simple and safe. Do me a favor and don't strawman my point trying to make me look incompetent and you the master of all things safe and smart. There's a whole bunch of people out there that maybe have a small generator but not enough money to hire an electrician and buy a transfer switch. All I'm saying is with a little self-education they can safely power their homes in a life endangering outage. God bless America, the land of the free and the home of the brave.

For the record I think we're both saying there's a dangerous and stupid way to do it. Depending on your location this also may be illegal. However it might be totally illegal where you live, it's up to the individual to check their building code and laws.
You obviously have an understanding of how to safely do this. It's the people that think a simple DIY $10 cord is a simple solution, while not knowing all the proper settings needed in the fuse box.

Do you know what would happen to a generator if it was back feeding to the grid (hooked up wrong) and power comes back on? I'm don't know and I am very curious.
 

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You obviously have an understanding of how to safely do this. It's the people that think a simple DIY $10 cord is a simple solution, while not knowing all the proper settings needed in the fuse box.

Do you know what would happen to a generator if it was back feeding to the grid (hooked up wrong) and power comes back on? I'm don't know and I am very curious.
If the generator is back fed to the grid the transformer at the pole will ramp up the voltage it feeds back into the line. It doesn't matter if the grid is on or off it will energize the line. That's why the key to backfeeding your panel safely is making sure that the main circuit breaker to the house is off. That's priority number one, kind of like not pointing a gun at another person and pulling the trigger.
 

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This topic's mainly about people who are familiar with standard residential electrical installations and the people who aren't. If you're on the ain't category, you could consider learning through reading or maybe taking a class or two. One thing's for sure, if you end up in a situation where you can't hire an electrician, or maybe you can't afford to hire one, it'll be up to you to bail yourself out.
Residential electrical systems are simpler than automotive electrical systems, and you owe it to yourself to learn about them as well.
 

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If the generator is back fed to the grid the transformer at the pole will ramp up the voltage it feeds back into the line. It doesn't matter if the grid is on or off it will energize the line. That's why the key to backfeeding your panel safely is making sure that the main circuit breaker to the house is off. That's priority number one, kind of like not pointing a gun at another person and pulling the trigger.
Thank you for your replies, you're totally right. I got some similar situations, and, to my mind, better call the pros sometimes. Cheaper and safer as a rule in case then you dunno what to do
P.S Was totally disappointed by Ecoflow generators(example of)
 

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"Do you know what would happen to a generator if it was back feeding to the grid (hooked up wrong) and power comes back on? I'm don't know and I am very curious."

With the generator running and the grid power (hooked up wrong and not isolated from each other) would there be damage to the generator, would lines get shorted out, would the breaker trip?
 

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"Do you know what would happen to a generator if it was back feeding to the grid (hooked up wrong) and power comes back on? I'm don't know and I am very curious."

With the generator running and the grid power (hooked up wrong and not isolated from each other) would there be damage to the generator, would lines get shorted out, would the breaker trip?
The utility company provides you with 240v via a center tapped transformer secondary which yields 240v line to line and 120v either line to grounded neutral (center tap). If the main breaker is not opened your generator would backfeed that utility transformer secondary stepping its primary voltage up to 7200v (or 3600v if you had a 120v generator). If you live in a neighborhood your generator would be trying to supply power to all your neighbors and the short circuit probably popping your generator's breaker with no damage. If not it would lug your generator enough to be immediately noticeable and could harm a utility worker if he weren't wearing gloves. I think they wear gloves and ground the wires while they are working on them but I wouldn't take the chance.

I place a lockout on main main breaker so if a utility worker is concerned over my generator running I can assure him my main breaker is open. The only other breakers I turn off are 240v; electric heat, PTHP, water heater and my well pump (which I just turn on as needed to keep water tank pressurized).
 

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The DIY generator hookup via suicide cord. I always find these the most cringe-worthy threads on the whole forum.

I think it mostly boils down to scrimping money on a safety-related issue. It's good to save money but that's not the place to do it.

Basically theres 2 things you need to do:
1. Make sure you don't backfeed the grid.
2. Make sure there are no exposed live parts.

I'll grant you that it MIGHT be possible to do these with a suicide cord assuming:
1. You're thinking straight when in a hurry, under pressure in the middle of the night/rainstorm/football game.
2. You're absolutely the only person who could ever touch it.
3. You don't want insurance money if you burn the place down.

Most people couldn't guarantee any of those. Your wife will want to fire the genny up while you're at work. Your brother/neighbor/kid will want to help and yank the live end of the cord out of the wall before you tell him it's safe. Planning to use a blatantly unsafe way of connecting a generator is just planning to fail. We're supposed to plan ahead for emergencies not be like the sheeple who will be trying to figure the same thing out in a disaster and burning their houses down. You're not the only person at risk if you don't do things right but your family, neighbors, and utility workers.

If you spent lots of money on a generator it makes sense that you'll have to spend some money connecting it. Who buys a pistol and doesn't expect to buy a holster and spare magazines and maybe better sights? So plan ahead and put in a proper transfer switch or interlock. In the grand scheme of things it's pretty cheap. You can read up on how to wire it in yourself or so you at least understand how everything works.

That or use extension cords to run individual loads, which for a smaller generator might be a better way to go anyway so you don't overload it.
 

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The DIY generator hookup via suicide cord. I always find these the most cringe-worthy threads on the whole forum.

I think it mostly boils down to scrimping money on a safety-related issue. It's good to save money but that's not the place to do it.

Basically theres 2 things you need to do:
1. Make sure you don't backfeed the grid.
2. Make sure there are no exposed live parts.

I'll grant you that it MIGHT be possible to do these with a suicide cord assuming:
1. You're thinking straight when in a hurry, under pressure in the middle of the night/rainstorm/football game.
2. You're absolutely the only person who could ever touch it.
3. You don't want insurance money if you burn the place down.

Most people couldn't guarantee any of those. Your wife will want to fire the genny up while you're at work. Your brother/neighbor/kid will want to help and yank the live end of the cord out of the wall before you tell him it's safe. Planning to use a blatantly unsafe way of connecting a generator is just planning to fail. We're supposed to plan ahead for emergencies not be like the sheeple who will be trying to figure the same thing out in a disaster and burning their houses down. You're not the only person at risk if you don't do things right but your family, neighbors, and utility workers.

If you spent lots of money on a generator it makes sense that you'll have to spend some money connecting it. Who buys a pistol and doesn't expect to buy a holster and spare magazines and maybe better sights? So plan ahead and put in a proper transfer switch or interlock. In the grand scheme of things it's pretty cheap. You can read up on how to wire it in yourself or so you at least understand how everything works.

That or use extension cords to run individual loads, which for a smaller generator might be a better way to go anyway so you don't overload it.
I agree 100%. And it amazes me someone would advocate telling others using a suicide cord is "OK" if you use common sense. This method isn't OK and shouldn't be advocated for use on a public forum in my opinion. Spending just a little money and doing a generator connection with proper utility lockouts or transfer switches with safety at the forefront should be the norm, especially here.
 

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I find one short (properly sized) extension cord neatly positioned to be less of a hazard than multiple cords plus multiple cords present fire hazards if not sized properly. I feel better flipping breakers for load management than managing multiple extension cords but that's just me. Keep in mind that safety is the primary concern and don't try anything beyond your capability (or the capability of your house wiring).
 

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The other side of it as well is knowing how to do it if you had to. You bug out - plans go wrong, but you leave and have a vehicle and trailer - generator goes in the trailer with other equipment. The world is falling apart, and you find a location that appears good and is abandoned. I'm not going to keep looking for a location with the proper connection, there may be no grid power anyway. At my house I'll gladly pay an electrician to put in a proper connection, but - the other side of it is, do I have some cords and connectors and understanding - how to make it work if I had to, which I think I now do - it is just like any of the other endless thousands of things you might learn in school, never going to need it, it is pointless knowledge until it is not.
 
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