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I've read posts on here for years about folks wiring their fuse boxed with a dryer outlet to back feed the panel, followed by hordes of other posters telling them they need a transfer switch and it's uber dangerous to do it without one. I've been doing it without a transfer device for decades without issue. It's brick simple and only dangerous if you're an idiot. Maybe I'm super smart or there's alot of morons in the world, I don't know. For me it's the same with firearms. They are very safe as long as you don't point them at another person and then pull the trigger. Never had a problem. Yet folks inadvertently shoot themselves and others every year so what do I know. Anyhow, back feeding the panel may be legal in your area, and it's safe & effective if you have two brain cells to rub together. Land of the free and home of the brave....
 

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Here's the thing most people don't think about: pole pigs.
AKA distribution transformers, those round grey things that hang on a pole or are mounted in a box near the street.

They take in high voltage (usually 15,000 volts) supplied by the power company, and transform it to 120/240 volts for your house.

But they work in reverse, too - if your generator sends 240 volts to the transformer, it will step up the voltage, putting 15,000 volts on lines that are supposed to be dead, so linemen and anyone working near fallen lines is in danger.

I bet there are several posters here who don't understand this, and maybe a few who just don't care if they kill a neighbor or a lineman, and don't care if they melt their own generator.

Yeah, you're "careful" - but I'm still not trusting you if you hand me a gun that you claim is "unloaded" - and I trust you to know a lot more about guns than you do about electricity.
 

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You can look for an adapter with two male ends but you'll be looking a long time! Might as well make your own.
I have that same generator plug and I wired it to a NEMA 14-50 4-hole plug for my Tesla receptacle. I haven't had a chance to test out but my plan is to disconnect all power, all breakers, plug in the generator and turn on selected breakers.
What I'm missing is a way to find out when the power has come back on.
 

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As a survivalist you should learn.
Yeah. Mostly though I just figure my little brother the electrician will outlive me. I will do all the welding and plumbing, and he will do all the motors and wiring, and we’ll share the food. He don’t have to lay under the tractor and run an overhead pass, and I don’t have to put my fingers in a panel. That’s a pretty fair deal.
 

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It's brick simple and only dangerous if you're an idiot.
Or if you are not around and someone else tries to set it up.

Or more likely, you are not around and someone else tries to disconnect it without out flipping the breaker to that plug, and now you have a hot "suicide" plug.

Or you simply have a brain fart and forget to switch both breakers.

Or time goes on and when you need it you kind of forgot how you wired it.
 

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So, for the electricians and anyone smarter than me, how is this outlet on the back of my house 250 Volts if it is a single 120 hot as the plug suggests. In my limited knowledge and I'm not going to do this, it just bugs me I don't understand it - that plug on the back of my house should be two 120 hot connections, and a ground, to make 240 volts. I guess I just don't get the wiring, I'd think to back feed this you would not use the white, you'd use the two hot leads from the generator and the ground. .
I glanced at all the responses and it doesn't look like anyone answered your question yet.

On that plug the white is hot on one phase at 125 volts, and the black wire is hot on the opposite phase of 125 volts. That gives you 250 volts of difference between them. And the green is your neutral and/or ground. There are times when neutral and ground can be tied together and times they can't that are beyond a simple answer.

I would suggest that you should get a professional in to do the proper wiring for you.

Also a transfer switch can be as simple as this Amazon.com with such a switch you CAN'T have both the main and the generator powering the panel at the same time unless you go at it with a hammer. And if you don't want to spend the $62 for one you can build your own with a chunk of steel, a drill and a grinder. A simple lock out like this makes a "suicide" plug or cord much safer, a recessed male plug with a cover makes it safer yet.
 

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And instead of using the plug you pictured to run power to the house use the proper plug. Something like this https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08T9748P...wg=pO664&ref_=sbx_be_s_sparkle_mcd_asin_1_img This one is only 30 amps, you would need one that matches or exceeds what you generator puts out you also need to size your wire from the generator to the plug and from the plug to the panel to handle what your generator can produce.
 

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Sometimes when you power the whole house, some one assumes that the power supply is as strong as the grid. It's not. which means it's easy to over load the generator.
When power goes out here I run a cord to the required equipment and every thing else remains dead. my lights are all 6-12 volt DC through out the house.
 

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Okay... there is a very simple and very legal way of doing this.

You need an interlock kit for your main panel. Every panel manufacturer offers them.

You'll need a 30a 220v breaker for your panel. You will install this breaker according to the instructions on the interlock kit (typically in the top right position directly under the main breaker).

You'll need a 30a 220v generator outlet and 10awg wire for the run.

Mount your generator outlet in the desired location and run 10awg wire (4 conductor). If you don't know how to do this... hire it out.

Shut off main power... install the breaker and interlock kit. Feed your 10awg into the panel. 2 hots to the breaker, 1 neutral to the neutral bar and 1 ground to the ground bar. Reinstall the box cover and re-energize the main.

The interlock kit makes it impossible for the main service breaker and generator breaker to be energized at the same time.

Now to test the generator install. Shut off the main breaker. Shut off all breakers in the panel. Engage the interlock and energize the generator breaker. Plug in the generator to the generator outlet and start the unit. Energize the circuits that you need being sure to not overload the generator.

On shutdown, switch off all breakers except the generator breaker... shut down the generator and unplug the unit. Now switch off the generator breaker and re-energize the main and all the other breakers.

Simple enough.
 

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Sometimes when you power the whole house, some one assumes that the power supply is as strong as the grid. It's not. which means it's easy to over load the generator.
When power goes out here I run a cord to the required equipment and every thing else remains dead. my lights are all 6-12 volt DC through out the house.
There ya go.

It’s an emergency generator. So I’ll have to go without Netflix and a hair dryer and a waffle maker. Emergency, to me, means my freezers and refrigerator keep working. I can go without the fan in the bathroom for a while. No chance would I wire my generator up to my house and hope I got it right. If someone was licensed and bonded and insured, and the county inspected his work, that would be OK. Especially if there was a fire and the insurance investigator came poking around.
 

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You'll need a 30a 220v generator outlet and 10awg wire for the run.
10 gage wire will only carry 30 amps 30 feet (with a 10% voltage drop and that 10% voltage drop is going directly to heating the wire)

Or it will carry 30 amps 10 feet with almost no voltage drop. If your run from the generator to the panel is more than 30 feet you really need to go with thicker wire.
 

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Or if you are not around and someone else tries to set it up.

Or more likely, you are not around and someone else tries to disconnect it without out flipping the breaker to that plug, and now you have a hot "suicide" plug.

Or you simply have a brain fart and forget to switch both breakers.

Or time goes on and when you need it you kind of forgot how you wired it.
If that's how you feel and operate in life then you probably shouldn't own guns, a chainsaw, cars or really any heavy machinery. Someone may get hurt.
 

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10 gage wire will only carry 30 amps 30 feet (with a 10% voltage drop and that 10% voltage drop is going directly to heating the wire)

Or it will carry 30 amps 10 feet with almost no voltage drop. If your run from the generator to the panel is more than 30 feet you really need to go with thicker wire.
True... but his generator isn't producing 30a. 18 running amps and 21 peak on 220v. 10awg is oversized unless the run is extremely long.

I will say that I assumed the outlet would be close to the main panel... so yes the wire does need to be sized for run length... but in this case, it should be unless its 100'+
 

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As a survivalist you should learn.
You’re right, I definitely should know more about it. But the last four years I worked, one of my departments was maintenance, in a place where the electric bill was about $28,000 a month. I learned enough from my electricians to understand you probably won’t get many second chances when you start making electrical mistakes.
 

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You’re right, I definitely should know more about it. But the last four years I worked, one of my departments was maintenance, in a place where the electric bill was about $28,000 a month. I learned enough from my electricians to understand you probably won’t get many second chances when you start making electrical mistakes.
For some reason folks have a hard time accepting that working with electricity is a learnable skill. It's no more dangerous or difficult to learn than handling a firearm, doing your own brake job, cutting your own firewood, driving a vehicle in traffic, operating carpentry tools, ect. It's not some mythical, secret science; actually, very strait forward. We should never be resistive to learning and becoming more self-reliant because of our fears. Just like operating a gun, driving in traffic, ect, you have to be clear headed and knowledgeable about what you're doing, but back-feeding an electrical panel is very doable by the average person. are there morons out there that will text while driving and kill others, mishandle firearms and kill others, chop their own corroded artery while cutting wood or operating saws? Yup. Does that mean no one should do it? Only rich people can have electricity when the power goes off? Nope.
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
As a survivalist you should learn.
yea, you don't have to do it, but - having some idea of how things work, if you had to do it - you'd have a prayer. I'll never do it - but, I think if I had to - life and death situation, I could wire this all up myself, but - I like the idea of hiring someone with insurance, who's done it before. If it is legal here - it will probably be an interlock and external plug.
 

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For some reason folks have a hard time accepting that working with electricity is a learnable skill. It's no more dangerous or difficult to learn than handling a firearm, doing your own brake job, cutting your own firewood, driving a vehicle in traffic, operating carpentry tools, ect. It's not some mythical, secret science; actually, very strait forward. We should never be resistive to learning and becoming more self-reliant because of our fears. Just like operating a gun, driving in traffic, ect, you have to be clear headed and knowledgeable about what you're doing, but back-feeding an electrical panel is very doable by the average person. are there morons out there that will text while driving and kill others, mishandle firearms and kill others, chop their own corroded artery while cutting wood or operating saws? Yup. Does that mean no one should do it? Only rich people can have electricity when the power goes off? Nope.
Yeah, I’m following you. On the other hand, I’m not gonna walk across a frozen beaver pond if I can just go around, or get all dressed up and break out a chainsaw if a couple whacks from an axe will do.

Guess I kind of look at the whole electricity thing from a different angle. Someday, there might not be any electricity flowing to the house, and might be no gas or propane for my generator, and my batteries aren’t gonna charge anymore. I already spend so much time without electricity, I‘m pretty used to it. It’s not that bad.

Except for the freezers. And my wife will hate it. Not sure yet what I’m gonna do about her.
 

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Yeah, I’m following you. On the other hand, I’m not gonna walk across a frozen beaver pond if I can just go around, or get all dressed up and break out a chainsaw if a couple whacks from an axe will do.

Guess I kind of look at the whole electricity thing from a different angle. Someday, there might not be any electricity flowing to the house, and might be no gas or propane for my generator, and my batteries aren’t gonna charge anymore. I already spend so much time without electricity, I‘m pretty used to it. It’s not that bad.

Except for the freezers. And my wife will hate it. Not sure yet what I’m gonna do about her.
Yupper. It's also empowering to do it yourself. I remember as a young man in my early 20s going to Just Brakes for a brake job. They filled me with fear and charged me $800 to change my brakes and rotors. Later in life when I learned to repair things myself, I was filled with anger and regret at how simple a brake job is.
 
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