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6 Boys and 13 Hands
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General is most senior Army officer to kill self

Rossi, who was 55, was just two days from pinning on his third star and taking command of Army Space and Missile Command when he killed himself at his home at Redstone Arsenal in Alabama. '

Investigators could find no event, infidelity, misconduct or drug or alcohol abuse, that triggered Rossi's suicide, said a U.S. government official with direct knowledge of the investigation. It appears that Rossi was overwhelmed by his responsibilities, said the official who was not authorized to speak publicly about the investigation.
Well this certainly will bring up a lot more questions than answers.

The bold text always infuriates me. It's like it's made up.
 

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The "official story" has more holes in it than Swiss cheese. No mention of how this New York native pulled the plug on himself. Was it a self-inflicted gunshot to the head, pills? Did he jump out of a window, CO2 poisoning, put a plastic bag over his head?

HOW DID HE DIE?

As I recall another senior officer died under strange circumstances at Redstone Arsenal. It was two years ago+/- when COL Richard Shepard allegedly shot himself in the head while in his residence.
 

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Peas and Carrots!
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I believe there was another one in Alaska a few years back. (2008-ish) A one star. SINSLEY, I think his name was.
Brig. General Thomas Tinsely, 3rd Wing Commander at Elemdorf AFB and F-22 pilot, shot himself in the chest in July 2008. No note, no motive, just an increased frustration and level of rage for the prior few months along with what is being called Raptor cough, that was becoming common to the F-22 pilots at the time.
 

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Had to look it up

"Rapture cough"-" Operational problems have been experienced and some have caused fleet-wide groundings. Critically, pilots have experienced a decreased mental status, including losing consciousness. There were reports of instances of pilots found to have a decreased level of alertness or memory loss after landing.[215] F-22 pilots have experienced lingering respiratory problems and a chronic cough; other symptoms include irritability, emotional lability and neurological changes.[215] A number of possible causes were investigated, including possible exposure to noxious chemical agents from the respiratory tubing, pressure suit malfunction, side effects from oxygen delivery at greater-than-atmospheric concentrations, and oxygen supply disruptions. Other problems include minor mechanical problems and navigational software failures.[216] The fleet was grounded for four months in 2011 before resuming flight, but reports of oxygen issues persisted.[217]

In 2005, the Raptor Aeromedical Working Group, a USAF expert panel, recommended several changes to deal with the oxygen supply issues.[218] In October 2011, Lockheed Martin was awarded a $24M contract to investigate the breathing difficulties.[219] In July 2012, the Pentagon concluded that a pressure valve on flight vests worn during high-altitude flights and a carbon air filter were likely sources of at least some hypoxia-like symptoms. Long-distance flights were resumed, but were limited to lower altitudes until corrections had been made. The carbon filters were changed to a different model to reduce lung exposure to carbon particulates.[220][221] The breathing regulator/anti-g (BRAG) valve, used to inflate the pilot's vest during high G maneuvers, was found to be defective, inflating the vest at unintended intervals and restricting the pilot's breathing.[222] The on-board oxygen generating system (OBOGS) also unexpectedly reduced oxygen levels during high-G maneuvers.[223] In late 2012, Lockheed Martin was awarded contracts to install a supplemental automatic oxygen backup system, in addition to the primary and manual backup.[224] Changes recommended by the Raptor Aeromedical Working Group in 2005 received further consideration in 2012;[225] the USAF reportedly considered installing EEG brain wave monitors on the pilot's helmets for inflight monitoring.[226][227] EEG monitoring could be used to program computers to perform functions

New backup oxygen generators and filters have been installed on the aircraft. The coughing symptoms have been attributed to acceleration atelectasis, which may be exacerbated by the F-22's high performance; there is no present solution to the condition. The presence of toxins and particles in some ground crew was deemed to be unrelated.[228] On 4 April 2013, the distance and altitude flight restrictions were lifted after the F-22 Combined Test Force and 412th Aerospace Medicine Squadron determined that breathing restrictions on the pilot were responsible as opposed to an issue with the oxygen provided.[229][230][231]"

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lockheed_Martin_F-22_Raptor


So Lockheed Martin designed and delivered a system that rendered a human pilot in effective. Got the contract to correct the problem, and is working on a nonhuman piloted aircraft. http://www.lockheedmartin.com/us/products/fury.html
Planned obsolescence at its finest.
 

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Brig. General Thomas Tinsely, 3rd Wing Commander at Elemdorf AFB and F-22 pilot, shot himself in the chest in July 2008. No note, no motive, just an increased frustration and level of rage for the prior few months along with what is being called Raptor cough, that was becoming common to the F-22 pilots at the time.
I knew the name was close. I wasn't able to do a check/see before I posted. Also I have never heard of Raptor cough. Learn something every day.
 
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