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To the brain trust:

As many of us are in various stages of prepping, I have often run accross different geiger counters online for sale. On ebay, one can find many types of geiger counters for sale at really affordable prices, however, being from the emergency management industry perspective, these counters may not have been calibrated recently or reliable in my mind. This does not mean that they couldnt be used and re-calibrated. I'd like to hear your thoughts on the matter and what the general consensus is. Has anyone purchased these cheap units? Which units are recommended such as: CDV-700, CDV-715, V777? I realize of course that alot of research is needed on what type would fit the needs of a family versus an individual who would be testing contaminated equipment and so forth. I have also run into the company that buys these cheap units up and recalibrates and tests them for resale at a modest price ranging in the $200-$300's at http://www.radmeters4u.com/ who has alot of information/research on how to buy one to fit your needs and http://www.ki4u.com/products1.php My understanding is that the cost of getting one tested and recalibrated is about $70-80 range.

So I ask you Mr/Ms. Prepper, what are your thoughts? ebay or a refurb?

Thanks for your responses!
 

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Permaculturist
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Own a "recalibrated" CDV-715. As I hold the unit, in any of the settings other than "Circuit Check", the needle jumps in connection with my heart beat. It is also hyper-sensitive to any type of movement. There is no audible click. It is an entirely visual device. Again, I paid for a "recalibrated" 715. It is pretty much worthless. I took it to the imaging lab at my job and it did not pick up x-rays while they were in use.

In response, I got a Sper Scientific 840007 and am quite happy with it in comparison. The 840007 measures 0.1-10mR/hr. There's an audible click, and physical needle, and you can measure gamma (incl. x-rays) and beta by holding the unit in a different position. This sucker starts pinging as soon as I get inside the x-ray room.
 

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A Geiger counter is good for gamma and x-rays, but what about alpha and beta particles? A Geiger won't pick those up.

Not to bash anyone who is thinking about radiation, chemical or biological exposure, but I constantly see folks talking about prepping for those kinds of scenarios and that is good up to a point. One thing I don't see people prepping for is a TIC/TIM. How many of you live near a railway or a sea port? Most everyone lives near some type of major highway. You stand a greater chance of TIC/TIM exposure than CBRN event that would require the use of a Geiger or M40 mask or both.
 

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Actually, depending on the design, a geiger counter will detect beta as long as it has a "beta window", usually an area you need to unshield on the end of the probe that is covered with what looks like foil. The foil is a low density metal that allows the beta radiaiton to penetrate. In the nuclear labs we used GM tubes all the time to measure beta. All the pancake type probes we used to frisk after leaving hot areas were GM tubes and would read beta and gamma (x-rays are low intensity gamma essentially). Alpha may or may-not be detected depending on the energy of the particle.
 

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Yeah I know there are certain instruments that will detect beta. Just like there are insturments that measure alpha. The OP left me with the impression he/she was only concerned with gamma. The thing is, you can't just measure gamma and detect beta, but leave out alpha. You gotta take in the the three main components of radiation; alpha, beta and gamma.

How many people know about NORM?

To answer jritter1's question: in today's climate that is a very tough call. There are better detectors on the market. I know how much one can afford to spend will have a very direct impact on the type and quality of detector one buys. Please keep this in mind, the CDV kits were built in the 1950's and 1960's. They will work and be reliable as long as you have a supply of D cell batteries and are calibrated. But, you are also buying 50+ year old technology. Analog of yesteryear in a digital age.

My advice is to look at your area and ask some basic questions; Do I live in a major population center (think L.A., NYC, Washington DC, etc)? Do I live near a nuke power plant?, Do I live near a military installation? What is the no kidding likely hood of a nuke weapon (mushroom cloud causing nuke) detonating within 100 miles of where you live? Alpha and beta particles will usually be found at the detonation site, until the wind picks up then they could be carried for a "few" miles. I say "few" because the distance depends on how big the device was and how fast the wind is blowing. It's subjective.

If you really feel you need radiation detection, buy the best you can afford. Make sure you get the manuals and conduct periodic inspections and turn it on to see if it still works from time to time. Keep the calibration current and never store the detector with battery installed! I have seen many CDV kits ruined because someone forgot to remove the battery.

Somthing else to keep in mind is time, distance and shielding.;)
 

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Molon Labe
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Yeah I know there are certain instruments that will detect beta. Just like there are insturments that measure alpha. The OP left me with the impression he/she was only concerned with gamma. The thing is, you can't just measure gamma and detect beta, but leave out alpha. You gotta take in the the three main components of radiation; alpha, beta and gamma.

How many people know about NORM?

To answer jritter1's question: in today's climate that is a very tough call. There are better detectors on the market. I know how much one can afford to spend will have a very direct impact on the type and quality of detector one buys. Please keep this in mind, the CDV kits were built in the 1950's and 1960's. They will work and be reliable as long as you have a supply of D cell batteries and are calibrated. But, you are also buying 50+ year old technology. Analog of yesteryear in a digital age.

My advice is to look at your area and ask some basic questions; Do I live in a major population center (think L.A., NYC, Washington DC, etc)? Do I live near a nuke power plant?, Do I live near a military installation? What is the no kidding likely hood of a nuke weapon (mushroom cloud causing nuke) detonating within 100 miles of where you live? Alpha and beta particles will usually be found at the detonation site, until the wind picks up then they could be carried for a "few" miles. I say "few" because the distance depends on how big the device was and how fast the wind is blowing. It's subjective.

If you really feel you need radiation detection, buy the best you can afford. Make sure you get the manuals and conduct periodic inspections and turn it on to see if it still works from time to time. Keep the calibration current and never store the detector with battery installed! I have seen many CDV kits ruined because someone forgot to remove the battery.

Somthing else to keep in mind is time, distance and shielding.;)

I live directly outside of Knox, home of The Maneuver Center of Excellence and US Bullion Depository AKA "The Gold Vault".

Had looked into the "ki4u" CDV kits, may be of some use in the advent of an attack.
 

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DOn't forget to get spare GM tubes for your meters, especially if they have a beta window as the beta window is easy to pop if you aren't careful.
 

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For those of us with little to no budget, those little "you've reached exposure considered to be in excess of recommended levels" detector card badges are also on the market. As are Iosat (?) tablets.

If they were just a tiny bit cheaper, I had thought that it would be fun to give them to TSA screeners, since those machines are notoriously NOT held to the same standards for output that medical machinery is.
 

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We wore ones you could look through to instantly get a reading of the dose you'd received whenever we would enter the reactor compartment. The problem with these was a hard bump and the needle would move and then you'd really have no idea if it had moved because of the bump or a sudden jump in exposure.

We also wore ones that couldn't be read until you were out of the area also, so the ones we could read were just a backup.
 

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New here. Saw this thread and was curious of if anyone had heard or thought about something I have been considering.

Not for any serious work in contaminated areas but for venturing in an area which may contain pockets of radiation and also other scenarios i guess.

http://www.nukalert.com/

Thoughts?
 

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Check this out

http://cgi.ebay.com/RADIATION-DETEC..._Protection&hash=item3a6338d99e#ht_2096wt_903

We have one of these, and it works great. I tried it in certain locations and it reacts very well.

I highly recommend this piece of kit as a part of your tools. It is about the size of a cell phone, and will fit into the bag easily. It will tell you what you can see and where not to go.

The company that makes this is from the Ukrane, and as we all know they have had there share of living with bad things since 1986. They have great reviews and are easily bought from ebay. I had mine ordered and delivered quickly, and am very happy with it.

If you want this capability, take a look.
 

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I live directly outside of Knox, home of The Maneuver Center of Excellence and US Bullion Depository AKA "The Gold Vault".

Had looked into the "ki4u" CDV kits, may be of some use in the advent of an attack.
The stick on rad indicators might be an option mainly due to it's inexpensive cost. If you live that close to Ft Knox, you might want to invest in a deep bomb shelter :cool:

A sad reality is if you are somewhat close to one of those things when they detonate, all the preps in the world won't matter. Of course, the size, type (sub-surface, surface, air burst, high altitude) and natural barriers (hills, depressions, etc) will depend on how much blast and heat you receive. Wind speed and direction will have an effect on the amount of radiation you get.

Too bad we don't have a choice when or where they go off!
 

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New here. Saw this thread and was curious of if anyone had heard or thought about something I have been considering.

Not for any serious work in contaminated areas but for venturing in an area which may contain pockets of radiation and also other scenarios i guess.

http://www.nukalert.com/

Thoughts?
I have had one for 5-6 years. It seem to work (when I am in Moab or other hot places out west it goes off on the low indication). It is small (you can carry it all the time) and it will let you know when things are getting hot.

The only drawback I see is the current price.
 

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Why buy a Geiger Counter when you can build a Kearney Fallout Meter (Foil Electroscope with a calibrated gauge). Geiger Counters require batteries, and all a KFM needs is something to generate a static charge and it can be improvised from household materials.

http://www.ornl.gov/~webworks/cppr/y2001/rpt/112538.pdf

http://www.ki4u.com/kfm.htm

This bears repeating, above. It's effective enough to keep you alive, can be built from improvised materials out of your trash, for the most part, and doesn't require batteries. The necessary desiccant to manage the humidity inside the device can be baked drywall compound.


I know it ain't all cool and sexy, like a Geiger Counter would be, but it is practical, and very functional, and it will keep you alive and healthy.


If you use recovered materials to construct the device, it will cost you NOTHING, other than time. The KFM is also extremely reliable. No electronics to burn out, and it operates on the proinciple of static charge dissipation due to ionization of the air inside it as a result if ionizing radiation exposure.
 

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I recently Bought the CD V-777 which is the complete survival shelter "KIT"
It Includes the following items
1- CD V-700 geiger counter (most useful for low level radiation ( up to 500 mr/hr)
1- CD V-715 area survey meter that can measure up to 500 r/hr good for nuke attack or major major nuke issue.
1-CD V 750 charging station for charging dosimeter pens
2- CD V-742 dosimeter pens

All the books and manuals on how to operate the stuff too.

Many of these can 777 Kits can be found in AS NEW condition for $200 or even less.

Again the V-700 is the most useful tool for A NON ATTACK situation like now.

The 715 and 717 are great in the event you are dealing with a serious contamination issue.

You scan forst on the high scale then progressively go lower. If nothing reads, then use the V-700 to proceed.

The V742 pens can be worn to show your actual dose over a time period.

The issue over seas at present is seeing very low amounts of radiation getting to the CONUS (US MAINLAND)

Heavy storms with the right winds and if the plants continue to spew radiation could see some slightly higher levels of radiation.

Beeing apprised of things is not at all a bad thing though.

Snowy
 

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I am sure the old CDV kits will work, but they still require calibration. For this radiation from Japan to affect the USA it would have to be a LOT. Yeah, we may be seeing spikes on the west coast, but it's still not enough to harm anyone.
 
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