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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here's a video showing the basics of how to store gas.



Usually in the fall the refineries switch to a different blend which helps engines start better in cold weather up north and such. Preferably this is the "blend" of gas you want to store.

The short video was not meant to be a comprehensive look at storing fuel, just a way for folks to get started storing some gas.

One viewer commented that Avgas would be the better to store. I think that depends a lot on your personal conditions. For me, the closest airport is 50 miles one way, usually no one is ever there and showing up with 10 or so 5 gallon cans WILL get you noticed. On the flip side, showing up at a local gas store with a couple cans at a time, wherein thousands of people do business daily, would make you less noticed. If someone asks "why you buying all that gas?" Start complaining- "[email protected]#%$ kids with those darn ATV's, they are going to have to get jobs... blah blah blah." That will usually end the conversation real quick :thumb:

Lowdown3
 

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Has anyone used this additive on gas that has sat for more than 2 years? I am wondering what the success rate is for using this for gas that has sat for a decade or so...
 

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High on a mountain top
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I read somewhere else that gas or diesel should be treated once per year, and if you do that it will be fine up to 5 years no problem. Also the lower the temperature of storage the better...
 

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Just A Shadow
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We just recently dug a pit to put our gas cans in. It's away from the buildings, out of sight, and has a pressure treated plywood cover which we covered with leaves and branches. The gas is in a cool dark place safe from casual theft.
 

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Aviation fuel is closer to pure Kerosene, so maybe not good for your vehicle

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jet_fuel

Kerosene will store for years untreated, so great for some vehicles, stoves and lanterns.
There are several different types of aviation fuel. The type you are referencing is Jet Fuel, which as you said, is essentially kerosene. Not for cars. Smaller piston engine airplanes (Cessnas and Pipers) will use 100LL (100 octane - low lead) fuel, or 80 octane, which will work. Early in my aviation career, I worked at a small airport, and on occasion, there would be someone who would come in and ask to fill up some gas cans. They used the aviation fuel because it still had the lead additive in it and they raced cars that required it. I didn't think it was odd in the least bit and asked no further questions, and I see absolutely no reason why someone would. Personally, I'd just tell them excatly what you want it for - "fuel without ethanol stores better."

That being said, I mentioned that this fuel does have lead in it. Long term, it's probably not a good idea to run it in your $60,000 SUV, but either way, running just enough to get to your hide, probably wouldn't hurt either (disclaimer - I am no mechanic!).

Your best option for aviation fuel is MOGAS. Most small airport sell MOGAS, which is auto-fuel. MOGAS is exempt from all ethanol laws that I am aware of, so there should none in it at all. If you want to find the nearest airport to you, just go to www.airnav.com and type in your hometown in the search engine. This would be your best option if you are looking for ethanol free gas near you. I have also heard gas purchased at Marina's do not have ethanol either. Always best to call and ask.
 

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I use aviation fuel and heating oil mainly in kerosene pressure stoves and lanterns, both work really well. My aviation fuel is now exhausted but I now have 100+ litres of heating oil, which is roughly 500 hours cooking time on a typical old 2 pint Primus stove; thats a lot of hot meals cooked:)
 
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