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How's it with stains?
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I've seen plenty about growing herbs in your garden but does anyone have any experience growing other things that may be useful for treatment like Aloe Vera?
 

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Calendula is a pretty flower that can be used for bumps, bruises, scrapes etc.
It can also be taken internally, but I would suggest a lot of research first.

Burdock root also has medicinal qualities - but the web page I read was quite complex so you'd need to read it too...
 

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I used to grow Horehound and Valarium (not sure of the spelling?) and Purple Cone Flowers. Unfortunately I havent found a source for plants since leaving the San Diego area for anything other than Purple Cone Flowers, other wise I would have a gang of things growing here. Of course I dont think I have ever not had Aloe Vera around and handy since I was a kid.
 

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There is a book [on my list of those to purchase, not just check out from the library] called "The Herbal Medicine Maker's Handbook: A Home Manual" by Green. It covers growing, harvesting, and using herbs in teas, infusions, etc., so you know not only which ones, but what to do with them once you have them.
 

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I forgot to mention some of my favorite medicinal plants

1. Mint preferably peppermint- good for stomach aches and indigestion.
2. Willow bark for anti inflamitory properties ( ie the stuff asprin was originally made from)
3. raspberry fruits and leaves are both medicinal. The leaves ahave been used to treat wounds and gastro intestinal issues. The fruits have anti inflamitory properties and are considered to reduce the risk of certain kinds of cancer.
4. In my area a plant know as "mormon Tea" aka Joint Fir contains some of the same ingredients as commercial decongestants and has been used as a cough medicine.
5. Yucca is a seriously important plant to have around.
a. you can harvest the leaves and use the fibers in them to spin your own rope basically that can be used for many things.
b. The root contains an ingredient that substitutes for soap.
c. certain varieties of yucca also produce edible fruits


Those are a few of the local ones of importance here. You should look for information on plants in your own areas as they can be much different.
 

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Guss Chiggins
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There is a book [on my list of those to purchase, not just check out from the library] called "The Herbal Medicine Maker's Handbook: A Home Manual" by Green. It covers growing, harvesting, and using herbs in teas, infusions, etc., so you know not only which ones, but what to do with them once you have them.
this is a good book. own it and is one of my favs. got me started making my own remedies. has all the info one woud need or want.
 

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Molōn Labe!
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aloe vera is easy to grow and probably the single best herb to ingest for its many health effects. Some people would argue for garlic, which is great, but aloe vera tops it slightly. Its just that most people only think of using aloe vera gel on burn wounds for external healing, rather than also eating it. You can even scrape the slightly yellowish interior of the leaf off to make a natural laxative.

Aloe vera propagates well when you divide child plants from the mother. If it's container grown, you will need to water it periodically, but grown directly in the ground, it can pull nearly all its moisture from the soil unless you are in near total desert areas.

In SouthWestern states, it is not uncommon to see aloe vera leaves for sale in supermarket produce isles that have been commercially grown. Oh, and if you use makeup, you are probably putting some aloe vera on your face also. :)
 
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