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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
me and my family are looking to build our BOL/homestead in missouri and have already priced out several spots all with and above ground water resource as well as the ability to dig wells.... what we are looking into is the ability to run on solar or other means of alternate power....

anyone in that area that may have some advice or info on what we need or can expect would be greatly appreciated..

what im looking to do is put in a good array and battery bank and then put in some supplemental wind turbines also...

looking to operate a med size home,, small fridge and a freezer,, tv and basic lights and charging,, more than likely we will use thermal or gas to heat water,, and have a wood stove for the heating...

my dream is to cut back and get off grid,, i can do with a day or so of candles every now and again,, just as long as i can back up enough to keep the freezer up ill be good to go
 

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I'd suggest taking a little time to read these threads. Every single question you asked has been answered. Over and over. :D:
 

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I'm not from misurri but my advice is applicable to anywhere.

Get soil samples of your sights first and have the ag extension office analyse them.

Second talk with your extension agent about plants that grow well in your area garden wise Esp fruit trees vines and shrubs as they take sever al years to fruit to a decade.

Once you pick the site you want first off plant your orchard because it will take a long time to get operational and large fruit harvests.


Also hoe much land you looking at getting
 

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My advice, speaking as someone who lives off-grid, is either plan to make big changes in the way you do things (in terms of electrical power), or plan to spend 20 times more than you think it will cost. If you have a wife and teen kids it will be harder to go the less expensive route.

Same goes for water. Off-grid, we keep it in storage tanks and fill them when necessary. Add greywater recycling and rainwater harvesting to your plans.

I would expect that you could get some good wind in Missouri.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
My advice, speaking as someone who lives off-grid, is either plan to make big changes in the way you do things (in terms of electrical power), or plan to spend 20 times more than you think it will cost. If you have a wife and teen kids it will be harder to go the less expensive route.

Same goes for water. Off-grid, we keep it in storage tanks and fill them when necessary. Add greywater recycling and rainwater harvesting to your plans.

I would expect that you could get some good wind in Missouri.
we are actually making some better decisions,, i have actually made arrangements to go ahead and get a fifthwheel rv,, this will allow me to start cutting back and we are going to downsize to live in the rv,, this way i can go ahead and cut our usage that way
 

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Good fortune with the homestead.

However as a alternative viewpoint to going off grid. It is a lot cheaper and more reliable to have the grid if available. That does not stop you from working your way to having backup alternative energy. It does allow you to run saws, drills, refrigerators/freezers, pumps, water heaters, stoves and electronics in the meantime.

Now if getting grid power is expensive, or impossible, the calculations change.

Nothing prevents a person being frugal while on the grid. Nice to keep them electrical bills low. BTW, in many cases using fuel for stuff will cost more than using electricity. Always do the math for any route you are going to go. Even heating with wood takes money to accomplish.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
our plan is if we can get the grid connection is not to connect it to the house or RV we are going to have it set up with a RV box like at a campground and that way we can use it when we need it and cut it off when we dont,, that way on bad nights or days when i need it i can use it,, and if i cant cover all my power needs with solar i can use it just for my freezer because i know that i can power my RV on solar pretty easy,, i just need backup power but i think i can control it with a good back up battery array
 

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we are actually making some better decisions,, i have actually made arrangements to go ahead and get a fifthwheel rv,, this will allow me to start cutting back and we are going to downsize to live in the rv,, this way i can go ahead and cut our usage that way
Been there and done that! Its a good way to get started.

Park it in the shade during the summer, or you will be wanting to run the AC!

Also, park it right next to a source of water! You'll need to fill up those tanks often.

Speaking of water, don't even move the family there until you get that water supply going.

You have to think about sewage. I used a combination of composting outhouse and greywater system. The toilet, sink and shower went to a greywater pit, so taking a pee indoors is not a big deal, but if residents needed to do more exciting toilet activities we used the composting toilet outside. There's more details in the link in my signature.

The great thing about camper living is that if you have a propane fridge and range, you use a lot less electricity. Unless you turn on that AC unit.
 

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If I had a voice I'd sing
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Good fortune with the homestead.

However as a alternative viewpoint to going off grid. It is a lot cheaper and more reliable to have the grid if available. That does not stop you from working your way to having backup alternative energy. It does allow you to run saws, drills, refrigerators/freezers, pumps, water heaters, stoves and electronics in the meantime.

Now if getting grid power is expensive, or impossible, the calculations change.

Nothing prevents a person being frugal while on the grid. Nice to keep them electrical bills low. BTW, in many cases using fuel for stuff will cost more than using electricity. Always do the math for any route you are going to go. Even heating with wood takes money to accomplish.

You are right of course. But there is usually a monthly fee just to have the grid power and it should be considered.

You're not still mad at me are you? I can't even remember what that was about. :thumb: Life's too short to have internet feuds!
 

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богдан;7675841 said:
I'm not from misurri but my advice is applicable to anywhere.

Get soil samples of your sights first and have the ag extension office analyse them.

Second talk with your extension agent about plants that grow well in your area garden wise Esp fruit trees vines and shrubs as they take sever al years to fruit to a decade.

Once you pick the site you want first off plant your orchard because it will take a long time to get operational and large fruit harvests.


Also hoe much land you looking at getting
i agree that the analyse is a good idea...talking to the local ag agent can be a big help if they are knowledgeable about what your doing ,,,but they tend to be more big ag than subsistence farming [not always but usually]

i disagree with planting the orchard first ,,,a couple reasons are if he put the money into gardening it will produce faster and feed him from then on,,
trees/bushes ect are not cheap ,,,seeds are in comparison
if he plants trees and things get bad it might be several years before they produce,,,the garden could keep him from starving until then

until he gets to know where things are going to be planting trees might end up being in the wrong spots and need moved or make doing what he needs to more difficult

fruit trees and bush are great ,,,i agree we should be planting as many as we can as fast as possible,,,i just think there's wiser ways to use money at the start that give us better results faster,,
take 1 k to play with ,,,sink it into a orchard and the deer /critters get to them you might lose all of them,,,take that same 1 k buy a tiller some fence and a 100 bucks of seeds you can be pretty sure to eat for a few years right off the bat,,add trees and bushes as the money/time allows
 
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