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My "go to war" rig is similar. Suppressed SBR, PC with stand alone level 4 ceramic plate, bump helmet with white phos filmless pvs14, and a TYR belt with M&P9 and mags for it and the rifle.

Realistically? I shoot coyotes out of my bedroom window with a suppressed 16" light weight carbine.
 

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What is everybody’s obsession with walking long distances? I mean sure prep for it and stay in shape. I walk a few miles a week myself up hill. But in most SHTF situations walking is not plan a or plan b. It’s somewhere around f.

I am interested in getting soft and hard armor. It’s on my list but not super high.

I’m trying to really decide what situations I’m likely to actually use it.

So far aside from a planned gun fight , which I’m hoping to avoid , I only see a few likely scenarios.

I think for the average person armor would be most useful if we have to flee a populated area or go through a dangerous area while bugging out or going home.

I see it as a short term solution. Not wearing a plate carrier while roaming around the woods eating rats.

I see it more like me and the wife and kids armor up and get in the car and drive out of town. And the armor is as much for stray rounds as an actual fight since we are going to try and avoid people.

Also if the neighbors need help maybe. Suit up to go lend aid. And of course if we find ourselves in situation where guard duty is a thing , that person should be wearing armor.
Ike: “In preparing for battle I have always found that plans are useless but planning is indispensable.”

Being in shape just makes good sense. To live.

Given that this is survivalist boards, folks are thinking about ways in which to survive.

While it’s nice to think we’ll never have to live in a world where we would HAVE to wear body armor for extended periods, there is absolutely no way to predetermine such.

So simply “being in shape” aside (to live), if one on here is planning on THE POSSIBILITY of HAVING to wear body armor, prepare towards more worst case. Simplistically, be fit enough to wear such while doing tasks for extended periods. From simple chores, to security.

If some comeuppance occurs wherein you ONLY need to wear armor on a rare occasion? Great! Not fantastic, just great. However, I can’t honestly consider a comeuppance occurring wherein we would want armor (routinely) & know when to wear it, and when not to.

Now, having said that, there are folks on here whom can’t (or no longer can) wear it, or do so for extended periods That’s quite different IMO, than folks who want to, but don’t feel the need to get into shape to do so.
 

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Hail to the King, Baby
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My "battle rattle" these days is a Blackhawk plate carrier with 3+ plates in them, (Will get traded for AR-500 steel once the soft armor for the ceramics comes in) a Blackhawk battle belt with three AR mags, four pistol mags, mag dump pouch, and IFAK.

Three AR mags on the front of the carrier, hydration carrier on the back of the carrier, and two tourniquets rubber banded to the molle above the mags.

My work pistol, Glock 17 gen 3, will get transitioned from the work duty belt to the battle belt with a spare holster already rigged and mags and weapon cross-loaded one to the other.

PSA 10.5 AR pistol to complete the kit.

All my pouches are Eagle Industries, hydration bladder is the Army issue Camelbak 100 oz., and looking for a good Molle compatible holster. Probably get one of the Eagle industries universals and dye it to be less ACU.
 

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What is everybody’s obsession with walking long distances? I mean sure prep for it and stay in shape. I walk a few miles a week myself up hill. But in most SHTF situations walking is not plan a or plan b. It’s somewhere around f.

I think for the average person armor would be most useful if we have to flee a populated area or go through a dangerous area while bugging out or going home.
I think you answered your own question:D: As mentioned I think the focus on wearing your armor on foot is no different than training for backpacking; you need to wear it in order to handle it. Some armor can weight quite a bit and those not conditioned will have trouble over any distance and would likely end up with a severe mechanical injury if they had to move fast or do any dynamic maneuvers.

I’ve seen a lot of guys not really looking like they’re in “fighting shape” with an awful lot of gear and significant weight. Water and bullets add up, and fast. If you don’t train with it or wear it routinely, you’re more likely a stud on Instagram and less likely on the dynamic training range. Again, balance is key as is understanding one’s own situation and most likely threats.

I’ve just decided that my III+ armor kit is really for around the home in dire situations or if I have to travel through a scene of road warrior in my truck. What I need is lighter armor that I can conceal (which is why I will be trying out Spartan-Armor’s thinner hard plates that only IIIA). At least for this winter, if I head into town, I can comfortably wear decent armor against all handgun rounds and stabbing attacks. It’s not perfect, but it’s something that I can carry much more often and more realistically.

ROCK6
 

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Rock, your post was four square. I would only add that I have no desire to wear battle rattle, full or not, as a 58 y.o. man. OTOH, I also see the point of wearing something, especially something lite and low profile.

Before this Covid insanity started, I had noticed that some of the regulars at our local survival store would show up in battlerattle, apparently fresh from the airsoft games. These were almost uniformly young enough for the desert deployments a a few had memory braclets. Didnt take long to figure out the puzzle, or, why they showed up exhausted. What I found was that the gear had advanced by lightyears but the tactics had only refined marginally, mostly to accomodate more efficient gear. The major difference was that the training was much more rigorous and highspeed. The combat wieghts had increased too. I dont remember humping a ginormous ruck.

One last thing: fake militias. Specifically, ones outfitted in airsoft battle rattle from the Wish app and outfitted with AR15-22s and airsoft ARs to skirt felons possessing firearms. You know who I mean. Mall ninjas on the march. I appreciate the effort and a knowledge the ease at which the fakes can become real but the lack of training and firearm practice is much more dangerous to everyone than even an ad hoc group formed on the fly but at least even having limited firearms experience.

Am I alone in this or just ****ing into the wind?
 

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The reason our troops carry so much ammo is because they using covering fire during an engagement. The Groo Clan is of above average sized for a family these days, but I have my doubts we could pull off covering fire very effectively even after the kids are in their teens and later with tactical training, and I couldn't see using it in a SHTF scenario anyways. I just can't picture the scenario where anything above squad level tactics would be used apart from actual open warfare.

I can see body armor as being much more useful than 6 mags if stuff starts going sideways in a big way, but that is a pile of weight when I consider everyone around here has deer rifles anyways, so you'd have to step up to level III or IV levels to be worth while, and that is a pile of weight to cover probably less than half of your body. You don't have a medivac waiting to save you hind end when someone blasts your leg off in any SHTF scenario, like our troops have. You will die anyways, so best focus on not getting hit at all. keep it all on the down-low. Ask yourself what would our troops do if they were in a group of 3 and had no back-ups available at all? I'm pretty sure they would not use these load-outs. In those sorts of situation, stealth is the only way to survive.
too recap; piles of mags are useless and armor isn't nearly as useful as you are probably thinking. I think I'd rather have a 2nd long-gun than all that stuff. maybe a suppressed 22lr shotgun or a long range gun. Maybe one of each to different members of a "squad".
 

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High Concept
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If people see themselves assaulting in force or in static situations like check points, then armour makes sense. Sure get shields even.

But conducting operations on foot as civilians, it would be best to concentrate on concealment and mobility, minimising gear as much as possible.

Civilians without the same supply and logistics are going to have be very selective in their operations and gear. Deciding early whether they are in defensive or offensive posture each time.
 
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