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Discussion Starter #1
I'm looking into alternate ways to refridgerate our food instead of electricity for use during power outages, whats some ideas cheaply.

I was thinking of stowing away a fridge from a camper that runs on propane if i can find one cheap enough and then transfer our food to that in a emergency , I don't really want to use a genny because of attracting people to the noise and cost and availabilty of fuel for it.

Is there any kind of kits to convert a regular fridge to propane?

Also how long will a 20 lb tank run a fridge.
I figure propane is easier to store than gasoline also.
 

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Thanks, sounds intersting.

I did a search for your post but it didn't come up with anything.

can you link it maybe to me or repost.
 

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They sell propane appliances. Check with the Propane dealers in your area. I was using an old Servel refrig my grandad had but it finally gave up the ghost. I wonder if Kev may have a source on them as well.
 

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AKA The Dragon
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Here is a link for making a charcoal fridge.
Used very soccessfully in the early pioneering days in Australia. It was said it would set geletine. Have seen only one about 15 years ago that was a home built project.

http://celac.wordpress.com/2007/06/18/54/
 
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The Amish are turning to solar power to run their freezers.

They mount a couple of solar panels on the house, use an array of batteries, some kind of heavy duty inventor to convert 12 volt to 120 and they are able to keep their food cold.

http://www.philly.com/inquirer/home...mish_turn_to_solar_power_for_electricity.html

The Amish shun connections to the outside, including the power grid, to run their buggy batteries, electric fences, refrigerators and sewing machines. But within their religious framework, using the sun to charge their batteries is acceptable, at least for some purposes, says Donald Kraybill, an expert on the Amish at the Young Center for Anabaptist and Pietist Studies at Elizabethtown College.

"It's like tapping into God's grid instead," he said.

Ben Zook, 25, saw the light seven years ago, when he decided to sell solar panels instead of making cabinets.

"I believed that I could make a living out of electricity," said Zook, who was raised Amish. "But what I didn't imagine was that solar would become almost a mainstream thing the world talks about.

"My total business doubled last year, mostly because of the Amish," said Zook, who owns Belmont Solar in Gordonville, Lancaster County. "It's a pretty rapid growth rate."
 

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We use a Con Serv model fridge and with the few ghost loads in the house and most everything off, the amp meter on the inverter shows 1 amp, so it isn't pulling much most of the time.

It was $900. and is kinda odd in that the freezer is on the BOTTOM. Door handles broke in a short period of time and the drain thing gets plugged REALLY easy (makes a mess on the floor if you don't catch it).

But I am impressed with the little power it uses. :eek::
 

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refridgeration

I wonder is there a way to utilize a crank generator similar to those on emergency radios to power a small freezer or refrigerator. You could use wind power and when there was no wind have a manual crank to turn by hand. Not sure of how to go about this but it is just a thought.
 

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armchair commando
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I JUST posted some info about food safety in the general prep area. I'll add it here....
Food bacteria...

* Discard perishable foods like eggs, meat, fish, milk, etc. which have been above 41 degrees Fahrenheit (F) for more than four to six hours.

* The average full freezer keeps foods below 41 degrees F for two to three days without electricity. Freezers that are less than full keep the temperature below 41 degrees F for a shorter period of time.

* If food still contains ice crystals or has been kept below 41 degrees F one or two days, it can generally be refrozen. Foods that have been at or below 41 degrees F for more than several days should be inspected carefully before eating or refreezing. If the color or odor of thawed beef, pork, lamb or poultry are poor to questionable, discard the meat (in a way that no human or animal will be tempted to eat). If eaten, this food may give someone food poisoning.

* You cannot necessarily tell by the odor whether vegetables, shellfish or cooked foods have spoiled. Since bacteria multiply rapidly in these foods, do not eat any that have thawed out completely. If the freezer temperature is above 41 degrees F for more than four to six hours, the food is probably not safe to eat. Bread products are exceptions.
 
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