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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Have any of you ever utilized freshwater clams as a survival food. In the area of Texas I live in , most of the creeks , and many of the lakes have clams that on average are about the size of your hand.
I know their are different varieties of freshwater calm as well, I have seen in the past a smaller variety with a light brown shell. If anyone has any special knowledge in this area , I would love to hear from you.
 

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I've collected and eaten them from the Tounge river,
in eastern Montana,more like chewed on them.
Not sure what kind they were, big ones.
I boiled them abit to kill anything bad in them.
They were really tuff,musta boiled them too much.
Had a nice river flavor.
I don't know anything more about them myself,
maybe someone else here does.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have never tried them myself, but their is an ancient Indian campground on one of the hillsides near a creek that has a lot of clams in it. We found the old firepits where the indians had cooked and they were loaded with clamshells , so they must have relied on them for food.
 

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I've collected and eaten them from the Tounge river,
in eastern Montana,more like chewed on them.
Not sure what kind they were, big ones.
I boiled them abit to kill anything bad in them.
They were really tuff,musta boiled them too much.
Had a nice river flavor.
I don't know anything more about them myself,
maybe someone else here does.
I tried some from a lake in CT. A "river flavor" would be an understatement. I dug them out of some mud and muck near the shoreline. The mussels tasted just like the black ooze I took them out of... Perhaps had we brought them up into the clean water for a couple weeks before cooking they might have been more platable. As it was they were about the vilest thing I have ever put in my mouth... and I'm pretty adventurous when it comes to food.

Allan
 

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I watched that excellent show about surviving in Alaska for some months a couple of months ago. "The Alaska experiment" I think it was. They said that it took just as many calories to find the clams that you got from eating them, but I'd rather eat clams than air even if no net gain. Was just interesting that they said there is no benefit to eating clams. I love clams, will not stop.
 

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Yep, I make river chowder all the time. The trick is to wash the clams really well and add them to the chowder at the last minute. Same with crayfish.

Maybe in Alaska it would take more calories to collect them than would be gotten out of them but here I can walk down to the river and come home with a pail full of them and crawfish in about 45 minutes and 15 minutes of that would be walking to and from the river. The main thing I like about them is I can collect them all winter long in certain creeks that run too fast to freeze over.

The item around here that takes a lot of calories to collect but is still worth it is wapato. Yum. You don't collect them until late fall and the water is darn cold. I often wonder if I waste more energy trying to stay warm than I do collecting it. Still I love to get out into the water and collect it and process it and...mmm...is it a nice wild plant to add to river chowder.

Tury
 

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sounds good. what else goes in river chowder?
 
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I googled "toxins freshwater clams",came up 175,000 hits.
These creatures,being filter feeders,apparently accumulate a lot of toxins in their tissues
http://www.tdn.com/articles/2007/04/25/area_news/news06.txt
This was just one instance.
Texas has a consumption advisory on them. In some places, you cannot eat anything that comes out of the water because of pesticides. There is a stretch of the Trinity River between Fort Worth and Dallas like that.
 

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I googled "toxins freshwater clams",came up 175,000 hits.
These creatures,being filter feeders,apparently accumulate a lot of toxins in their tissues
http://www.tdn.com/articles/2007/04/25/area_news/news06.txt
This was just one instance.

Anything you get out of any river is considered to be harmful in some way. We have been dumping toxins into our environment for too long to have any water animal be free of toxins. Scary thing about this is that most of the domestic food supply has toxins, antibiotics, worming medicines...the list can go on and on. Not to mention that domestic foods are just bred for sell, have little or no nutitional value and are higher in fats and sugars than their wild counterparts. Diabetes is just one disease that is found to be the direct cause of a domestic diet.

The thing is no one warns us about how dangerous domestic foods are yet we have warning all the time about how dangerous wild foods are. Why would this be? Because domestic food producers spend a lot of lobbying money to make certain there aren't warnings put on their foods. Warning put on wild foods are just a way of scaring most people into not being self sufficient and buying food that is just as bad or worse from the people who spend money to make certian you are too afraid to eat anything they did not make money on.

I'd eat a wild clam out of a small creek anyday over chicken raised on a factory farm. There would be much less toxins in the clam than in that chemically fed chicken. The same goes for any meat raised on most large farms and the milk and the chemicals sprayed on all the veggies and fruits. Domestic food production is much worse than wild food consumption.

Tury
 

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sounds good. what else goes in river chowder?

River chowder changes with what you find out in the wilds to eat. Mine usually has some sort of fish, clams, and cray fish as it's meat source, wapato as it's main starch, and wild leeks and hedge garlic as it's main flavor. Then it just depends on what else I find as to what goes in it. Put a bit of powdered milk into the broth and it becomes chowder. No powdered milk? Then it's just river stew. Both are good.

Tury
 
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