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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Here is our fresh cow cheese process that we make almost daily. There are many different types of cheese that can be made; here is one of the easiest and fastest ones to make.

First start with the fresh cow’s milk, this is fresh from the daily milking within the hour. We take the milk from the small buckets and pour it into these larger 5 gallon buckets, with the cows we have we can fill 2 ½ of these five gallons buckets each day.



When the milk sits it begins curdling, this is when you mix it a little by hand. You have to do it by hand to be able to feel the consistency of the curd.



After you’re assured of the consistency and you have stirred the curd off the bottom by mixing it you begin staining the liquid whey





After you have separated as much liquid whey as possible this is what the curd look like




What we have done to make it easier is was to sew a small bag of fabric that in the shape of pouch and when used will act as a filter




By hanging the pouch over the rim of the bucket and using the handle to hold it in place you can easily begin putting the curd in the pouch




Once the curd is in the bag you use the actual bag as a strainer.



Then you mash the bag and extract the excess liquid





When the mashing is complete you simply drain the excess liquid (whey) into a bucket









Once the whey is completely strained out you simply place the curd mix on the grinder plate




Here is s close up shot



This is our “Modern” electric grinder that makes things easy, and these models are very affordable.





Ok, Ok I know what you’re thinking; what if there isn’t any electricity…


When there is no electricity you will have to have the “Back up” manual hand grinder, which we have two. Believe it or not this particular hang grinder is only about 5 years old, but is in rough shape from almost daily use.




End of part 1..
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Did you add anything to the milk to make it curdle? If not, how long did it take to reach the consistancy that you needed?
Nothing added to make it curdle, only to help it and I made an error in the post saying it was fresh form the same day, as we always let it sit a day and I wanted to clarify it is cows milk.

What I meant to say in the post which I will correct is every day we use fresh milk and replace the day old stock when we make the cheese.
 

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Von Helman, I want to say I really liked this post but I have a few questions for you if you can answer. How much milk do you process on an average day and how much cheese do you get? So, you don't use any additive to make the curds? Do you heat the milk at all? What do you do with the whey? Which cheese flavor in this similar to? How much salt do tou add? Would this work if the fresh milk has been refrigerated prior?

Again thanks for the post.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Von Helman, I want to say I really liked this post but I have a few questions for you if you can answer. How much milk do you process on an average day and how much cheese do you get? So, you don't use any additive to make the curds? Do you heat the milk at all? What do you do with the whey? Which cheese flavor in this similar to? How much salt do tou add? Would this work if the fresh milk has been refrigerated prior?

Again thanks for the post.
Ok let me try to answer all the questions,

As I posted the actual cheese making process and not from the actual beginning

We have 17 dairy cows, and as I mentioned they produce on average 10 gallons of fresh milk per day.

We have to keep the calves separated and away from their mothers or we won’t have any milk in the AM. We trade and sell some of the raw milk and only use and process only one of the 5 gallon buckets per day.

When the milk arrives to the kitchen we strain and clean it, because during the milking process there is always some foreign object that gets into the milk like some straw dust or something of that nature.

I attached a picture of the simple strainer we use and we simply pour all the milk through this a little at a time to get it all cleaned. There are Nat’s, dirt, and other debris that unavoidably get into the milk.



Once the milk is strained and cleaned then we put it inside the refrigerator where we have removed the lower shelf so a large bucket can fit inside.
We let it sit over night and let the cream come to the top. In the morning we then separate the cream leaving the milk.

Taking the milk we them warm it up on the stove and stir. At this time you add the rennet chemical.

After it has been warmed we simply set it in the chair next to the wood burning stove where the warm temperature of the room allows it to curdle within an hour.

From there this is where this picture process begins that I have posted above.

As for salt, only a couple of tablespoons

This yields about eight (8) cheeses this size

Your other question was what is done with all the Whey after separating it out.

We simply put it in another 5 gallon bucket and that bucket along with all the table scraps or anything else from the day that a pig will eat is then taken each morning to the pig pen where we have a slop trough and pour it in and feed it to the pigs.

This is instant FREE food that we use for the pigs, when the pigs are fattened we sell them for money.

 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Very interesting, thanks for all the great info Von. Methods I've heard of before sounded way more complicated than this.
It is labor intensive but not difficult, and even the labor isn’t all that difficult it just requires several steps. I figure posting pictures like this will help others learn how to do such simple things. Some urban cheese makers use items and milk form the store to make their cheese, at least they are learning the basic processes.

I figure if there is a total social and economical collapse I will at least have cheese to eat, sell and trade.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I'm a pest!!!! But thanks for the info.
Not at all,

If you don’t ask you won’t learn or get the answers. I had made the post with the cheese making steps as I figured that is what the person who had asked was interested (just the steps from after we have the curd)

I mentioned in the beginning that we use fresh cow’s milk again to clarify the type of milk we use as other people use goat milk or even store bought milk.
By you asking me these questions its actually show me that next time I post something like this I need to post each step along the process.

I also was told by another member how cleaver it was that we use the Whey for feeding the pigs because disposing of the whey is one issue you have when you make cheese.

Again thanks for the questions and don’t consider yourself a pest.
 

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The Power of III
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My grandmother always fed whey to the pigs, sometimes with a little bread mixed in. They love it!

Could you use some of the whey for other things too though, like cooking? I use the whey I get from my kefir grains for use in biscuits, pancakes, waffles, scones, bread - could you use the milk whey for this too?
 

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i know how to partially make cheese now!! hooray! thanks Von
 

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I tried making some cheese a while back. I had alot of problems. One being storebought milk. Ultra pasteurised milk wont make cheese at all, and homogenization makes the curd weak (so says some forums).

Even after i got some un-homogenised whole milk that was low temp pasteurised ($5 a gallon), i still couldnt get a good curd. The only rennet i could find locally is "junket" brand. In some cheesemaking forums, some say it works, some say it doesnt and is only for making custards and icecream.

What kind of rennet do you use? My experiment was a failure, and i wasted enough gallons of milk that i believe the rennet to be at fault.

The whey can be used to make ricotta cheese. I was aiming for a 100% homemade plate of lazagna.
 
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