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No, not for freshness...

Ive been stocking up on lamp oil, wicks and lanterns. Since I have gallons of the stuff in my closet - I am thinking of moving it into the barn (saftey first). The barn is not insulated.

Winters here are brutal and negitive temps are common. My question is, if the oil freezes, does it affect quality :confused:. I threw a half used container of it in the freezer and it didnt congeal, separate or look any different.
 

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Ham Extra Class
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The quality of Petroleum products are not affected by coldness.
The quality of petroleum products are affected by prolonged heat, and moisture.
However extremely cold lamp oil may burn with a lot of soot until it is warmed up a little.
 

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Pantomime Villain
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I don't think so. We've had some pretty harsh winters in the UK these past few years and the next door neighbours' old diesel van had the fuel 'wax' up a few times. As soon as it warmed up he fired up and carried on OK without any problems.
 

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Leave Me Alone !
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I have never heard of it freezing, though I live in the deep south. I do keep quite a bit of it outside in a storage area of my barn. The newer thin plastic bottles tend to degrade and even leak. So I started pouring mine into plastic gas cans for storage. Seems to be working fine after 2 years. You can always try to put some insulation around them by buying cheap styrofoam Ice Chests, placing the bottles in them and duct taping it closed. That might help protect and insulate them somewhat from the direct exposure to cold.
 

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Fly it Northward
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I have a 10 gallon can of it that came with my property. It's been frozen each winter for about 5 winters now. We see -40 for a few weeks each winter. The lamp fuel is fine.

Depending on the manufacturer or source, you may see parafin (wax) flakes in it at temps below about -15c. It's no big deal. The parafin will melt back into the fuel at room temp. You can use it cold but it smokes a little bit.

Hope this helps:)
 

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Super Gassy Moderator
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Most lamp oils are nothing more than deodorized kerosene. Cold weather doesn't bother it a bit. If you get the kind that is actually liquid paraffin (mineral oil), it might gel, but when it warms up, it melts again and is fine.
 

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Crusty, Crunchy and Cute
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No, not for freshness...

Ive been stocking up on lamp oil, wicks and lanterns. Since I have gallons of the stuff in my closet - I am thinking of moving it into the barn (saftey first). The barn is not insulated.

Winters here are brutal and negitive temps are common. My question is, if the oil freezes, does it affect quality :confused:. I threw a half used container of it in the freezer and it didnt congeal, separate or look any different.
It does not have a freezing point, it only gets thicker. Chemically it doesn't change.
 

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PreparationInBubbaNation
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I have never heard of it freezing, though I live in the deep south. I do keep quite a bit of it outside in a storage area of my barn. The newer thin plastic bottles tend to degrade and even leak. So I started pouring mine into plastic gas cans for storage. Seems to be working fine after 2 years. You can always try to put some insulation around them by buying cheap styrofoam Ice Chests, placing the bottles in them and duct taping it closed. That might help protect and insulate them somewhat from the direct exposure to cold.
Yes Sir, danged old bottles leak in about six years when stored outside
 

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Be careful of any liquid (fuel, oil, alcohol, etc.) that does not freeze. It may look and work fine at -10 deg F, but it is still -10 deg F. If you spill it on your hands/skin, you will get instant frostbite.
I've spilled unleaded gas on my hands at -45F and didn't get frostbite. It certainly wasn't comfortable to my already cold hands, but instant damage of any kind would have to occur at much colder temps than even -60F.

If anyone is budget minded about their lamps, you can also use diesel in them, but you have to clean the glass pretty regularly.
 

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lamp oil does freeze

Lamp oil does freeze. I left my home in Northern NH for a few days in the winter...when I came home, the oil in the lamps was frozen solid, as was the oil/wax mixture in my lava lamps. After thawing out via woodstove, everything was fine.
 

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just a thought, but if it's for Long Term Storage, what if you keep an eye out for a cheap barrel, get all your oil together, and bury it with the top of the barrel just a few inches below the ground? Assuming you're not talking super harsh temps for long time periods, wouldn't the ground temps keep the stuff above freezing, if only slightly?
 

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well, your mostly right, but lamp oil not K1 solids up around 15 deg F. when it thaws it can draw in moister its been rumored it can explode but that's false, it takes a flame to get it to catch on fire.

being a x-fire fighter I know about this, lamp oil only burns vaper not liquid 3 things is needed 1) fuel 2) oxygen 3) Ignition source just thawing the oil will not do it.

if putting it out side till you need a bottle no problem as long as you bring it in a day or two before you want it, I use jet fuel in my lamps and generators that's good to the following:
Jet Juel
Flash point 38 °C (100 °F)
Autoignition temperature 210 °C (410 °F)
Freezing point −47 °C (−53 °F) −40 °C (−40 °F)
Max adiabatic burn temperature 2,500 K (2,230 °C) (4,040 °F) Open Air Burn temperature: 1,030 °C (1,890 °F)
FIRE FIGHTING INSTRUCTIONS : carbon dioxide, dry chemical, or alcohol compatible foam is recommended.

liquid Paraffin
FLASH POINT / METHOD : 300°F (150° C) / PM, Min.
AUTOIGNITION TEMPERATURE : 500°F (250° C)
FLAMMABLE LIMITS IN AIR % BY VOLUME: None Expected.
FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD : None Expected.
FIRE FIGHTING INSTRUCTIONS : Water spray, carbon dioxide, dry chemical, or alcohol compatible foam is recommended.

notice flash points! 410 vs. 500 the freezing points -53 for jet +15 for liquid Paraffin

I'm sorry if there is too much info or I'm confusing the point
 
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