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Should I freeze Ramen noodles like I would rice or pasta to get rid of bugs and their eggs?
 

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Freeze all dry goods? Can you tell me or link me to what this means and why it's beneficial? Thanks!

Hi Mike! I'm new and from KY too!
 

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I think they are safe unfroze, re bug eggs, but the packaging will not stop bugs from getting in them. I have a case in my freezer just for safe keeping.
 

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Hey Red,

Always happy to meet a new neighbor!

This has been talked about a bunch here in the forum and on other sites.

The basic deal is that if you freeze: Flour, pasta, rice, etc it goes a long way to killing the bug eggs that might hatch and contaminate your food.

If you hit the search button in the top right hand corner of this page and put in "Freeze Flour" it will give you a whole list of very informative threads.
 

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I (having lived and worked in Japan for 5 years) am and expert on the subject of Ramen.

Pronounced La'men by the Japanese--or just "men" for short.

No, you do not freeze the noodles.

In fact you do not purchase those cheap Ramen packs you find in the grocery store either. These are instant Ramen's. Sure these are good for camping, etc, but not the prefered Ramen by a true conisuer (sp?). Tip: if you use instant package ramen, boil the noodles seperately, then drain off. Boil the soup water in a teapot, dump the soup base into a bowl and pour in the boiling water--add the noodles. Do not add the soup base package to the boiling noodles--this creates ramen gak.

Now if you find a real Japanese market, run by real Japanese (no Koreans, not Chinese, not Vietnamese) you will find some real ramen. You can find some good dried ramen, with liquid soup base packs--or frozen ramen with liquid soup packs.

For our long term purposes.... go with the dried ramen. They do not come into the cheap instant packs. Usually them come three or four in a package. This is the higher quality ramen. Same prep as the cheap instant brands--but you don't eat them like the cheapy instant type.... there's more cooking involved.

Stir fry some onion and chicken, beef, or pork strips with the onion. Any concoction of vegies and meat will do. Add this to your soup base. This is how a real ramen works.

I advise you to seek out a Japanese Ramen shop--and try the real thing. I've got plenty in my area, but if you live in-the-middle-of-nowhereville, this will be hard.

Also try cold ramen--it's called "Hi-ya-shi Chu-ka." And you can also find these in the Japanese markets (just ask for help, they will know what this is).

Hiyashi Chuka is a cold ramen eaten in the summer--wow! This is good stuff. The cold ramen noodle is covered with thinly sliced (long ways) of ham and cucumber, then smothered slighly with a kind of thick cold sweet-ish sauce. There will be dried chuka kits at the Japanese markets.

Also.... I would recommend you look into Buckwheat Soba. It's just simply boiled and dipped in a "ponze" sauce (also ask the people at the market). The soba comes in bound small packets--like spagetti, are easy to make and quite good when covered in diced green onion with a little wasabi paste on the side of the bowl.

You can eat soba hot or cold--there are soup bases for both.

Also... look into "somen". This is a rice noodle which can be eaten both hot and cold.

Ramen, Soba and Somen are cheap ways of stocking up on lots of wholesome food. These are a vital part of my food program.

If you want links to this stuff, just ask.

T
 

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have humped ramen/hot sauce over 20 yrs--no matter the luck of draw c-rats to mre's--could still make eatable--travel light & freeze at night
 

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Takezo, please correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe that the 'instant ramen' that you buy in a regular grocery store are deep fried?
I've been told that anyway.

The reason I bring this up, is to answer the O.P.'s question, if this is true, then no, you would not need to freeze them.

Oh! Takezo, please share your links, I, too, am in nowhereville.:rolleyes:



Michelle
 

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I (having lived and worked in Japan for 5 years) am and expert on the subject of Ramen.

Pronounced La'men by the Japanese--or just "men" for short.

No, you do not freeze the noodles.

In fact you do not purchase those cheap Ramen packs you find in the grocery store either. These are instant Ramen's. Sure these are good for camping, etc, but not the prefered Ramen by a true conisuer (sp?). Tip: if you use instant package ramen, boil the noodles seperately, then drain off. Boil the soup water in a teapot, dump the soup base into a bowl and pour in the boiling water--add the noodles. Do not add the soup base package to the boiling noodles--this creates ramen gak.

Now if you find a real Japanese market, run by real Japanese (no Koreans, not Chinese, not Vietnamese) you will find some real ramen. You can find some good dried ramen, with liquid soup base packs--or frozen ramen with liquid soup packs.

For our long term purposes.... go with the dried ramen. They do not come into the cheap instant packs. Usually them come three or four in a package. This is the higher quality ramen. Same prep as the cheap instant brands--but you don't eat them like the cheapy instant type.... there's more cooking involved.

Stir fry some onion and chicken, beef, or pork strips with the onion. Any concoction of vegies and meat will do. Add this to your soup base. This is how a real ramen works.

I advise you to seek out a Japanese Ramen shop--and try the real thing. I've got plenty in my area, but if you live in-the-middle-of-nowhereville, this will be hard.

Also try cold ramen--it's called "Hi-ya-shi Chu-ka." And you can also find these in the Japanese markets (just ask for help, they will know what this is).

Hiyashi Chuka is a cold ramen eaten in the summer--wow! This is good stuff. The cold ramen noodle is covered with thinly sliced (long ways) of ham and cucumber, then smothered slighly with a kind of thick cold sweet-ish sauce. There will be dried chuka kits at the Japanese markets.

Also.... I would recommend you look into Buckwheat Soba. It's just simply boiled and dipped in a "ponze" sauce (also ask the people at the market). The soba comes in bound small packets--like spagetti, are easy to make and quite good when covered in diced green onion with a little wasabi paste on the side of the bowl.

You can eat soba hot or cold--there are soup bases for both.

Also... look into "somen". This is a rice noodle which can be eaten both hot and cold.

Ramen, Soba and Somen are cheap ways of stocking up on lots of wholesome food. These are a vital part of my food program.

If you want links to this stuff, just ask.

T
I prefer the Udon noodles, myself.
 

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Sorry, I completely forgot about this thread.

Takezo, please correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe that the 'instant ramen' that you buy in a regular grocery store are deep fried?
I've been told that anyway.


Not deep fried--but "deep dried."
Some are deep fried though, and you should stay away from these.

http://www.justhungry.com/instant-ramen-and-cup-noodles-are-very-very-bad-you



But to make them taste better--do not cook the noodles and soup base together.
Boil water, add soup base to bowl--stir.
Strain off water from cooked noodles, add to soup base in bowl.


I prefer the Udon noodles, myself.


Udon is also available in instant packs.
But mostly from Japanese markets.

Oh! Takezo, please share your links, I, too, am in nowhereville.

Here's one. They sell by the case...

http://www.ramencity.com/eshop/bindex.asp?category=japanese+ramen:package
 
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