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Hey, I was thinking of getting a 3-month supply of freeze-dried or dehydrated food, like this, when I can save some money:
http://www.providentmetals.com/3-month-food-supply-1080-servings.html
It would be reassuring to me, because I have a big family, and this would last a long time (25 years on the shelf?!), is easy to store, and hopefully be nutritious, but in looking on the internet, there are tons of options. How do I know where to get it? and what is a good deal? I assume it isn't all the same, different nutrition content, etc.... Has anyone else ordered anything like this?
Thanks.
 

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Hey, I was thinking of getting a 3-month supply of freeze-dried or dehydrated food, like this, when I can save some money:
http://www.providentmetals.com/3-month-food-supply-1080-servings.html
It would be reassuring to me, because I have a big family, and this would last a long time (25 years on the shelf?!), is easy to store, and hopefully be nutritious, but in looking on the internet, there are tons of options. How do I know where to get it? and what is a good deal? I assume it isn't all the same, different nutrition content, etc.... Has anyone else ordered anything like this?
Thanks.
I wouldn't worry about 25yr storage until you have at least a 5 yr supply.
 

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If you have the money and want to get a kit that you can simply forget about for a long, long time.... then do it. It doesn't matter if you have 5 years or 1 week, start somewhere. Many people will scoff at spending that kind of money since you can put so much more into long term storage for the same amount.
Everyone should start somewhere and once you get the product and some water stored up, you will feel a lot better.

Taste, quality, etc. will honestly be about the same and you can get good and bad reviews on every type of product available. Lots of sodium content in most of it but it's not supposed to be a gourmet healthy feast, it needs to keep your family alive and functioning.
 

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Hey, I was thinking of getting a 3-month supply of freeze-dried or dehydrated food, like this, when I can save some money:
http://www.providentmetals.com/3-month-food-supply-1080-servings.html
It would be reassuring to me, because I have a big family, and this would last a long time (25 years on the shelf?!), is easy to store, and hopefully be nutritious, but in looking on the internet, there are tons of options. How do I know where to get it? and what is a good deal? I assume it isn't all the same, different nutrition content, etc.... Has anyone else ordered anything like this?
Thanks.
you cant beat the prices for emergency food at costco.com , i buy from them all the time. Sam's club online is a good supplier as well.
 

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I did the store bought freeze dried/dehydrated food thing myself for awhile. Worse waste of money I ever spent.

Do yourself a favor. Buy a good quality dehydrator and do it yourself. It's very easy and with a few mylar bags and O2 abs you get the same thing.

Having the benefit of a dehydrator also gives you the ability to take advantage of free produce, which we find a lot, or really good deal at the store. If you grow a garden it's invaluable.

I have an excaliber and it's a workhorse for the price. I used to live near where they are at so I had the pleasure of meeting them face to face. Very good people to work with.
 

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Never go by "number of servings." Always go by calories. They're all pretty notorious at padding the numbers. And even when you're calculating calories, subtract all the sugar and sweet drink mixes that they like to add to boost the paper numbers. Only calories from food count. That's how you find out how many days that supply will really feed you. Some of the worst "year's supplies" are really only about a 6 month supply at best. Even less when you subtract the sugar.

Also, when looking at prepared foods, look at the ingredients. A lot of them aren't much more than flavored food starch with few real food ingredients. This is a quick path to malnutrition. Some of the companies are not packing true "survival food" but instead are just packaging the same crap foods that you see in the stores as convenience foods and box mixes.

I tend to store individual ingredients (dehydrated) because I can turn them into anything I want and they're 100% pure food. Not starch and adulterants.
 

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+1 on learning to dehydrate foods yourself. I started doing it a couple of months ago and it's great. I know exactly what's in my food and exactly how much food it actually is.
For instance, I bought 8lbs of kiwi on sale, sliced, and dehydrated it. It filled 2 quart jars. If you know how much food you dehydrated, then you know how much re-hydrated food you'll have. Much easier to estimate how many servings you really have.
Buy fruits and veggies on sale and process them yourself. Save lots of $ that you can spend on other preps.
Check out dehydrate2store on youtube. You'll learn everything you need to know.
 

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If you have the money to do it why not its for LTS and then you have something to put on the shelf for a safety net and then you can take it a bit slower and learn shorter term rotation while Adding to your LTS...
To me its a Win Win if you can afford it.
 

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Hey, I was thinking of getting a 3-month supply of freeze-dried or dehydrated food, like this, when I can save some money:
A lot of those meals like what you linked to are low calorie, and loaded with sodium.

One issue with the page you linked to, there is no nutrition or sodium content posted. I have seen meals that are vegetarian, which means they are low calorie, and loaded with sodium.

For a rough example, some of the examples I have seen in the past are 300 - 400 calories per serving, and maybe 700 mg of sodium. To reach 1,500 calories a day you will have to eat 3+ meals, which equals well over 2,000 mg of sodium a day.

You should never eat more sodium then calories.

High sodium food should be a small portion of your preps, and not the majority.

Unless the website has the nutrition content posted, do not buy from them
 

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Sorry, long post...

There are many posts on these forums from people with varying ideas on what to do and what not to do. I don't agree with a lot of them.
I do agree that you should look at package contents and ingredients, just like buying anything else.

Whenever I see the large bulk items for sale, I think to myself don't be in a hurry to put all of your eggs into one basket (ie. all of your food into one purchase). The reasons are below.

Personally, I recommend having way more basic ingredients than entrees (ie. pre-made meals), at least 10 to 1, the basics typically have longer shelf life and nutritional value.
When buying basics, buy the cans or pails of individual vegetables and fruits and grains and proteins (beans, meat subs, etc.), also sugar, salt, honey etc., don't stock up on massive amounts of entree meals. The packagers tend to not do a well-balanced entree meal set, plus you may be stuck with some meals you don't like. I only rely on the entrees for any short-term outages, such as the typical 72 hour emergency kit.
I also recommend storing a wider variety of food storage types when starting out and if limited by funds, with smaller purchases of each type, in other words don't put all your eggs in one big mylar ;) .
So I don't recommend buying the massive bulk packages for $1500+ unless you already have a massive stock of other food and storage types, instead you should pick and choose from a variety of food and storage types with each purchase. Every month I do some food, health and medical, and gear, with the money I have available to budget.

I don't fully agree with many of the comments that I see, and I do things different than many posts for (what I believe to be) simple logical reasons.
No one knows what's coming. That is the reason why we prep. People who lean on one type of food storage, or one method, may be in for some rough times depending on what disaster they run into.
I believe in mixing smaller containers (#10 and 1 gallon max size) of a wide variety of food types and storage times (MRE, bulk food in 1g mylar, cans, jars, freeze dried, dehydrated, etc.).

- I don't agree that 25yr FD/DH supplies are a waste to buy.
Situations may occur where you can lose one type of storage medium.
Just because it says it will last 25yrs doesn't mean you have to wait that long before you can use it. But if you only stock up on 5 year food, MREs etc. and lose a lot of them to a heat-wave or other disaster, then you are in trouble (every +10 in storage temp typically cuts the shelf life in half).

- I don't single mylar a 5 gallon bucket of beans, rice, wheat, etc.
You lose a seal, have a bag puncture, insect or mice issue, whatever, that is now one large bucket of throw away food. Result: the loss of a year of one staple.
I only package basics into 1 gallon mylars max and have them in a number of smaller buckets or large bucket mixes. Larger buckets contain a mix of various mylar basics, if you have to flee it would be better to grab a 5 gal with a mix of basics (sugar, salt, grains, veges, fruit, etc.) than a 5 gal of nothing but beans.
For many people, having a single mylar 5 gallon bucket of beans may also mean that once opened they go bad before consumed, with possibly no electricity to use your iron to reseal it in between uses.
I have no items at all in a single 5 gal mylar.

- I don't agree that doing it all yourself is better or cheaper versus buying pre-packaged FD/DH.
By the time you consider the cost of the can or bucket, the mylars, the absorbers, the food, the dehydrator, the bag crimper, your time and electricity to prepare and package all of it... then what happens if you made a mistake or packaging issue: bad seal, contaminates in the food preparing, etc.
I do about a 50:50 combination of self-packaging and professional packaged FD/DH (Mountain House, Thrive, etc). If months into a disaster I find some of my packages spoiled, chances are the others packaged by the pro's are still good.

- I don't like the idea of buying the big bulk sets.
I buy my pre-packaged foods: MRE, FD/DH, canned, etc. in small purchases and from a number of stores local and in other cities.
What happens if you bought a 5 year massive supply and later there is a recall on all that food created on that date from that factory. Or worse, what happens if you don't find out until in a disaster when you open them to find them all black and non-edible.
By spreading out your purchases to multiple stores and smaller purchases over a long period of time, the chances of you getting any food that you have to discard becomes less.

My goal is to have a minimum of 5+ years of a wide variety of everything possible in the basics and canned/jarred, and 3-6 months of MREs and entrees.
Every week when I go to the grocery store, I pick up a few additional packages of whatever I need for canned and basics, making sure that I have lots of stock for the types of food that I actually eat. If you like milk and eggs and spuds, always make sure your food stock has plenty of them in dried/flaked/etc., in both self-packaged and pro-packaged.
Every couple of months I put in another order for pro-packaged FD/DH basics and maybe some MREs, along with the packaging supplies I need (mylar, o2, etc.).
As I use up any jar preserved and pickled (from my mommy and our local farmers garden outlet) I replace them.

Congratulations, you made it to the bottom of this wall of text.
Hope my opinions helped someone... :)
 

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- I don't agree that doing it all yourself is better or cheaper versus buying pre-packaged FD/DH.

i like your way of prepping, it is pretty much how im doing it now, except i consider doing it yourself ALOT cheaper then buying those prepacked meals,

we built a simple food dehydrater under 24$,you dont have to buy the sealer, (iron, straightener) and the buckets i find free all day long. the only thing i end up paying for is the mylar bags and o2 packets

but i do like the idea of "putting your eggs in different baskets" so your not just counting on one thing
 

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i like your way of prepping, it is pretty much how im doing it now, except i consider doing it yourself ALOT cheaper then buying those prepacked meals
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Thanks.

Unfortunately I'm in Canada where a lot of the supplies are either non-existent or obscenely expensive. :(

The typical price for ONE 1 gallon 10x16 5mil mylar bag here is $1.25 or more.
Forget purchasing any of the mylar/o2 from the US, our dollar is basically the same value, but they gouge you on shipping, so that it ends up no cheaper than the other high prices from any stores already here.

And grocery prices here are also probably twice that of the US.
Here a small 500g bag (1lb 6x9) of powdered skim milk is $6.39, a tiny jar of natural peanut butter is $6.25, etc. And the larger packages when available scale up price according to size.

For me to make up a #10 can with a 1 gal mylar + o2 for 3x 500g bags of powdered milk would be ~$25, assuming that I got the can for free.
I can buy a prepacked #10 can of FD/DH/O2'ed of most of the basics for typically $10-15, usually much less than if I did it myself.

I still do my own packaging of basics and DH (dehydrated) and do some canning with my parents just for variety, but it is very expensive to do any of these here, which is one reason why I store about 50:50 home-made and pre-made.

Even though our dollar is about par with the US, ie. $1 = $1, on pretty much everything you want to buy here, we get hosed (eh!).
We typically pay 150% to 250% higher than US on everything including identical items from the same multi-national stores.
I guess it is for my privilege just to be Canadian... :confused:
 

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Even though our dollar is about par with the US, ie. $1 = $1, on pretty much everything you want to buy here, we get hosed (eh!).
We typically pay 150% to 250% higher than US on everything including identical items from the same multi-national stores.
I guess it is for my privilege just to be Canadian... :confused:
damn, i had no idea it was that expensive, across the street from my house is a ferry that goes to BC, i wander if it would be worth it to have an american buy a bunch of stuff for you then you come pick it up, i bet you would save a ton of money, assuming its a big load and the ferry/gas wasnt too much lol
 

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damn, i had no idea it was that expensive, across the street from my house is a ferry that goes to BC, i wander if it would be worth it to have an american buy a bunch of stuff for you then you come pick it up, i bet you would save a ton of money, assuming its a big load and the ferry/gas wasnt too much lol
I recently bought a SOG Tomahawk.
$28 US at Amazon.com
$62 CDN at Amazon.ca
I was lucky and found one new on eBay.ca for $50+shipping, still a lot more than $28 though...
I looked on Sams in Seattle WA and 4.5lbs of milk is less than $20.
Here, $30-35.

Unfortunately the cross-border stop may have charges, plus I'm in NE BC so it's a looong day's drive to the border. :)
 

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I recently bought a SOG Tomahawk.
$28 US at Amazon.com
$62 CDN at Amazon.ca
I was lucky and found one new on eBay.ca for $50+shipping, still a lot more than $28 though...
I looked on Sams in Seattle WA and 4.5lbs of milk is less than $20.
Here, $30-35.

Unfortunately the cross-border stop may have charges, plus I'm in NE BC so it's a looong day's drive to the border. :)
well i think America is headed that way too unfortunately......i hope i can prep enough stuff for me and my family before prices get too ridiculous
 

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Thanks.

Unfortunately I'm in Canada where a lot of the supplies are either non-existent or obscenely expensive. :(

Even though our dollar is about par with the US, ie. $1 = $1, on pretty much everything you want to buy here, we get hosed (eh!).
We typically pay 150% to 250% higher than US on everything including identical items from the same multi-national stores.
I guess it is for my privilege just to be Canadian... :confused:
Wow good to know we are not alone in the rip off department. Could it be a Commonwealth thing? Over here we pay almost everything 2-6 times higher than the US for exactly the same thing, even locally produced items such as milk.
 
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