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If you had to pick one pack to tote with you, knowing you could never go home again would you carry a frame back pack or frameless for survival? I currently have a black 5.11 rush 72 that I use for work to carry my rescue gear ect, but I am looking to get another back pack to use for my bob that will go with my load out gear. I'm thinking about another 5.11 rush 72 is either multi-cam or flat dark earth once I decide what color gear I'm ordering. I have never owned a back pack with a frame so I would like to hear from others.
 

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I think frameless ones are more comfortable but you can use the frame to tie things to. Sort of a personal preferance I guess.
 

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I like my bag and i've mentioned it a lot because i like it so much its frameless but has tons of PALS webbing to attach pouches and has a flap that unsnaps on the bottom so I could secure sleeping bags or a pad or skies or whatever.
 

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Maximus
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If you had to pick one pack to tote with you, knowing you could never go home again would you carry a frame back pack or frameless for survival? I currently have a black 5.11 rush 72 that I use for work to carry my rescue gear ect, but I am looking to get another back pack to use for my bob that will go with my load out gear. I'm thinking about another 5.11 rush 72 is either multi-cam or flat dark earth once I decide what color gear I'm ordering. I have never owned a back pack with a frame so I would like to hear from others.
Hands down I would go with an internal or external frame backpack if I had to carry stuff never to come home again. A frameless backpack would not cut it past 30lbs. It will not carry well, hurt your shoulders and make you work harder.

Internal frame or external is personal preference. But external hauls more load easier.

I think frameless ones are more comfortable but you can use the frame to tie things to. Sort of a personal preferance I guess.
I think you may be confusing "frameless" with interal-frame. And frame as external frame packs...

Internal frame backpacks have frames also, but as the name indicates, it is inside the backpack. External frame backpacks have the metal frame where you lash things to.

A true "frameless" backpack will have no internal frame. Think bookbag or dufflebag etc.
 

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Live Secret, Live Happy
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Easy, my Kelty Tioga frame pack. I've already carried it on dozen of trips and carried heavy items that don't fit in a bag. It is really the most durable and adaptable pack type.
 

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Misfit Toy
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Without a shadow of a doubt, a frame pack. Regardless of manufacturer. You cannot support a large load without one, imo.

My choice would be a Mystery Ranch NICE BVS Frame system w/Crewbcab & loadcells/7500 series bag combo.
 

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Above all, endure
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Depends how much gear I'm carrying. Anything over 45lbs is way more comfy with a frame, but currently my pack weighs about 12lbs dry.
 

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My personal opinion based on experience I'd go with an external frame bag because they breath better not being so close to your back, you also get good weight distribution, that's if your carrying weight
 

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Mountaineers and skiers have used soft and internal packs as long as external framed packs have been around. The difference is what you intend to carry and where. For large bulky items ( animal quarters, gas cans, chain saws , ammo cans, etc...) or in very hot weather external frames do best. However when you are hiking off trail/bushwhacking , running , climbing , dropping to prone position to shoot or being extremely active internal framed packs are significantly better. Granite gear and Mystery ranch have some interesting alternative to deverse hybrids like the N.I.C.E. Or Granites gear hauler.
Hope this helps out some
 

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Hands down I would go with an internal or external frame backpack if I had to carry stuff never to come home again. A frameless backpack would not cut it past 30lbs. It will not carry well, hurt your shoulders and make you work harder.

Internal frame or external is personal preference. But external hauls more load easier.



I think you may be confusing "frameless" with interal-frame. And frame as external frame packs...

Internal frame backpacks have frames also, but as the name indicates, it is inside the backpack. External frame backpacks have the metal frame where you lash things to.

A true "frameless" backpack will have no internal frame. Think bookbag or dufflebag etc.
Yep you're right I was thinking internal frame.. Thanks for correcting that!
 

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Traveler
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Generally internal frame packs with their minimal stay frames are a lot better if you are traveling over rough terrain. They tend to be lighter and thinner and are much better for climbing over and under things and less likely to pull you off balance that the rigid external framed packs. Internal framed packs are good at carrying gear inside of their bags and don't do as well strapping loads on the outside, especially if the load is not well balanced. External frames can carry gear strapped to the outside nearly as well as on the inside.
 

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I like internal frames for their lower profile. Busting through a lot of brush with an external frame can be tough. But I once shot a spike buck, gutted it, and tied it to a packframe and carried it about (a mile or two). Must have weighed a hundred pounds but had no real trouble because it was a nice modern Kelty frame.
 

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Maximus
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Again, what it comes down to is how much gear are you planning to sling and for how long. The 5.11 Rush 72 would be good for what it is designed for... a 72 hour bag. If you plan to carry it weeks on end, I say you need a frame.
 

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I would go with an external frame also. Mine is a Cabela's Alaskan Guide Model Frame Pack and I love it. A big plus is the ability to use the pack frame separately from the bag, it's like having two backpacks in one.
Last year my cousin and I hauled my mule deer out with our frame packs, his being a Cabela's Extreme Alaskan Outfitter Pack, I had two quarters, the head and he had the other two quarters. It was a piece of cake. I would not want to try the same thing with a internal pack.


 

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Keep in mind that anytime you attach anything to the frame of a pack it changes the center of gravity. Try and balance it out if you use the frame alot and try and keep the items as close to the pack bag as possible, and stabilized. I've seen many a folk twist an ankle because they had something swaying around behind them and threw their balance off enough to cause them to miss a step.

Naturally this isn't referencing frames that are intended to use with out the pack bag, although you still want to balance and stabilize, like the guide up above. There are many haulers like this that could have a ton of uses in a grizzly man situation where you have to live off the land and start all over in the wilderness. My bug out bag however is intended to get me to my bug out location. Our ranch. Once there we have everything and everyone we need with us.
 

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Subculture
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Call me old school and thrifty, but I don't see myself getting away from my ALICE pack any time soon. It fits me like a glove, hauls anything I stuff in it, and I can pull the pack off of the frame and tote a jerry can on it easily. You can also quarter up an animal and strap it to the frame to hump it out of a ravine. Did I mention inexpensive? Keep in mind that the ALICE frame was modeled around the torso of a 5'10" average male. The closer you are to that number, the more comfortable you will be. There are also a ton of mods and upgrades to make it more comfortable. I have a Camelbak daypack for those just gotta get out there days. as well.
 

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I am Defendor
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Frameless packs have an advantage of balance and weight in rugged country where rock climbing and assending via ropes will be the manner of how a person has to navigate, they also have a disadvantage the internal frame is literally sewn into the pack and is not very robust. I can carry an engine block on a alice pack frame.
For weekend rock climbing trips a frameless pack is great but living man vs wild where you may need to improvise having a real frame where you tie things on your pack or use any type of bag, sachell ,or even a broken frameless pack to tie onto a frame and move to me is a great benifit.
A pack with a broken frame can be a worse experience than having no frame at all, being able to fix a frame with duct tape and debris again is of some benifit
 

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Keep in mind that the ALICE frame was modeled around the torso of a 5'10" average male. The closer you are to that number, the more comfortable you will be.
That's awesome. I learn something from you guys everyday. Thanks for including that bit of information...
 
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