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How many Bible translations have you read?

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Rom 14:1, 13; Jam 4:11-12
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Years ago I was given a New Testament book from a charitable organization around Xmas time. I read the recommended reading for the 12 days of Christmas (30 actually). It might seem disrespectful but I continue to read this small book when it is convenient, which is the sauna in the gym.

Today I came across something that was eye opening and cross-referenced it to my 2 study Bibles and another Bible that was too new to have a study version when I got it. The new testament book is the ESV translation.

This got me thinking. Of those who have read the entire Bible in more than one translation, how many Bible translations have you read and what were those translations? Could you evaluate the pros and cons of each translation you've read? Thanks!
 

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Layman
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I generally only read from the RSV-CE. But I try to take into account and compare with other translations out there.
I also try to take into account the source text of the translation.
For example the KJV and NKJV are based off of byzantine type text so these translations will have additional verses where some of the more modern translations will have these verses in the footnotes.
 

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Rom 14:1, 13; Jam 4:11-12
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Discussion Starter #3
I generally only read from the RSV-CE. But I try to take into account and compare with other translations out there.
I also try to take into account the source text of the translation.
For example the KJV and NKJV are based off of byzantine type text so these translations will have additional verses where some of the more modern translations will have these verses in the footnotes.
Hmmm. My NLT footnotes sometimes say things like a certain word translates literally as X in Greek (or Hebrew as the case may be).

I never heard KJV & NKJV came from byzantine type text. What’s the difference and what are the alternatives?

My boss at work is fond of saying ‘single source of truth.’ Nice idea in theory. In practice, you have things like Harvard Law professor Alan Dershowitz contradicting what he said during the Clinton impeachment.

While the wording is slightly different, it is amazing how similar the thoughts are across different translations.
 

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Layman
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Hmmm. My NLT footnotes sometimes say things like a certain word translates literally as X in Greek (or Hebrew as the case may be).

I never heard KJV & NKJV came from byzantine type text. What’s the difference and what are the alternatives?

My boss at work is fond of saying ‘single source of truth.’ Nice idea in theory. In practice, you have things like Harvard Law professor Alan Dershowitz contradicting what he said during the Clinton impeachment.

While the wording is slightly different, it is amazing how similar the thoughts are across different translations.
The differences are minor.

to understand a type text you have to understand how we got the bible. for centuries scribes manually copied the texts as a result there are minor errors got included. Local scribes copied the errors and gave a certain characteristic there texts.

most of the modern bible translations use an Alexandrian-style type text. which was the most common type text in early Christianity. In other words, modern translations use the older manuscripts to form their translations because it is more likely that interpolations were included in the later manuscripts.

A good example of What I'm talking about is Matthew 17:21 in the NLT.
if you look at the bible it isn't in the reading of the book. it goes from verse 20 directly to 22. Verse 21 is in the footnotes as follows.
**Some manuscripts add verse 21, But this kind of demon won’t leave except by prayer and fasting. Compare Mark 9:29.
 

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Rom 14:1, 13; Jam 4:11-12
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Discussion Starter #5
An example in this mornings devotional reading @ GE12:37 &40. The NLT footnotes read:

12:37, or fighting men; Hebrew reads men on foot.

12:40, Samaritan Pentateuch reads in Canaan and Egypt; Greek version reads in Egypt and Canaan.
 

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I love this *****
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I've read two versions completely: The King James (preferred) and the New American Standard. However, I (up until recently) owned more than 20 versions and did lots of side by side comparisons of verses and/or passages over the years. Some of the newer versions are missing entire passages of Scripture.

A great book for anyone's library is "New Age Versions" by G.A. Riplinger.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/096358450...qmt=e&hvbmt=be&hvdev=c&ref=pd_sl_6dlmjx7bya_e



The version of the Bible a person reads and studies can greatly direct his/her theology and biblical conclusions. I think choosing the correct Bible is essential in understanding God's message and His truth.
 

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That'll be the day...
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I'll admit that I have never read the whole Bible, completely through.

I have read nearly all the books, but have never.... completely endured through Leviticus.

The ESV is my 'goto' these days. In the past, I have spent a lot of time with these:

Amplified
NIV
NKJV
NLT

I now use Bible Gateway a lot. I love to open up a verse, and then open 3-5 translations, side-by-side.

Here's an example....

https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=1 john 1:9&version=RSV;ESV;NIV


.........
 

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I use e-sword, a free download where you can choose as many versions as you like, as well as a plethora of other study materials...

https://www.e-sword.net/

EVERY translation has mistakes (translators are not infallible), so I enjoy seeing how others have translated passages. The bottom line for me is to always look at the word the translators looked at, compare how the same word is translated differently throughout Scripture, then I am able to come to a more complete understanding using context.
 

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I love this *****
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That is why I recommend to EVERYBODY HERE the Orthodox Study Bible, the most complete Bible in English language.

https://store.ancientfaith.com/orthodox-study-bible/

https://www.amazon.ca/Orthodox-Study-Bible-Hardcover-Christianity/dp/0718003594

One version I used to have in my collection was the "Third Millennium Bible" which I purchased from the Orthodox church when I was attending it. It's basically the King James with a few updates:


https://www.amazon.com/Third-Millen...rds=new+millenium+bible&qid=1580483523&sr=8-1
 
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I love this *****
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I generally only read from the RSV-CE. But I try to take into account and compare with other translations out there.
I also try to take into account the source text of the translation.
For example the KJV and NKJV are based off of byzantine type text so these translations will have additional verses where some of the more modern translations will have these verses in the footnotes.

True. Interestingly, many of the "new" version updates are adding the verses the KJV already has as those updates occur. So, in essence, they're getting closer and closer to the KJV as the years go by.
 
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I love this *****
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Years ago I was given a New Testament book from a charitable organization around Xmas time. I read the recommended reading for the 12 days of Christmas (30 actually). It might seem disrespectful but I continue to read this small book when it is convenient, which is the sauna in the gym.

Today I came across something that was eye opening and cross-referenced it to my 2 study Bibles and another Bible that was too new to have a study version when I got it. The new testament book is the ESV translation.

This got me thinking. Of those who have read the entire Bible in more than one translation, how many Bible translations have you read and what were those translations? Could you evaluate the pros and cons of each translation you've read? Thanks!

Out of curiosity ... why did you "X" out Christ?
 

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Rom 14:1, 13; Jam 4:11-12
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Discussion Starter #14
That is why I recommend to EVERYBODY HERE the Orthodox Study Bible, the most complete Bible in English language.

https://store.ancientfaith.com/orthodox-study-bible/

https://www.amazon.ca/Orthodox-Study-Bible-Hardcover-Christianity/dp/0718003594
I don't want to tell you this but one day I do want to take up your recommendation. That you explained that the Orthodoxx Bible has more books has me intrigued.

So, thanks for your contribution on that score. Now, onto this thread, if you have not actually read more than 1 Bible translation ...
 

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Rom 14:1, 13; Jam 4:11-12
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Discussion Starter #15
I generally only read from the RSV-CE.
Not sure about that translation. But I know you are a Catholic and a Catholic friend of mine has a large Catholic Bible prominently displayed in his living room. In perusing it, it seemed very readable (not like the middle English KJV).

Are there several Catholic translations in English?
 

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One version I used to have in my collection was the "Third Millennium Bible" which I purchased from the Orthodox church when I was attending it. It's basically the King James with a few updates:


https://www.amazon.com/Third-Millen...rds=new+millenium+bible&qid=1580483523&sr=8-1
Never heard of it. And if it doesn't say Orthodox in the Title (and also actually be printed by an Orthodox Church) I would not trust it. Case in point "Third Millennium Bible" was not the Orthodox Bible.
 

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Rom 14:1, 13; Jam 4:11-12
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Discussion Starter #17
The version of the Bible a person reads and studies can greatly direct his/her theology and biblical conclusions. I think choosing the correct Bible is essential in understanding God's message and His truth.
Thankfully I don’t. Reading any translation with the HS is what is key IMO.
 

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Mostly I try to work with the Nestle-Aland Greek New Testament and the Tanakh Hebrew for the Old Testament, unless I am trying to make a point using the English on one blog or another.

In terms of English translations, it depends on what you want to use it for. For study I prefer the NASV, but for devotional reading either the old KJV or the ESV are good.
 
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