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Born 120 years too late.
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Discussion Starter #41
All it takes is one bad snow storm to sell someone on 4WD/AWD. My late wife bought the Toyota Highlander after a 2009 blizzard, amazing traction in snow or mud. My one son still drives it, even on the beach to go surf casting.
SOMETIMES even 4WD is not enough.
could you imagine this in 2WD?

A pic of a buddys ride before I winched him out.:D::D::D:

 

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Retired Army
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That's when you need not only 4 wheel drive, but chains on both ends... or a lifted modified 4 wheel drive with much bigger tires, and lockers.


Nobody ever uses tire chains anymore it seams unless they live in a mountain area.
 

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That's when you need not only 4 wheel drive, but chains on both ends... or a lifted modified 4 wheel drive with much bigger tires, and lockers.


Nobody ever uses tire chains anymore it seams unless they live in a mountain area.
Chains can help in certain situations, but I have lived in the mountains of the west for 30+ years and have never needed them on a 4wd vehicle.

I do think they have a place in ICE conditions. In snow, chains only work well when you can still 'dig' down to the road base for traction. Once you start having to push snow with the axles, front bumper, and then grill ( in the right conditions ) they lose a lot of effectiveness and you start using a LOT of fuel to do it.

My personal solution for deep snow conditions is lower air pressure in the tires. With the right setup and conditions, snow depth doesn't really matter anymore. You can get get the vehicle to float enough on the snow that it isn't pushing too much snow to maintain forward progress. In my experience this is faster and more efficient with fuel. It does typically require larger tires, but is still amazingly effective on normal vehicles. On a specialized vehicle it is frankly amazing what you can do.

I'd love to build a specialty set of studded flotation tires for extremely icy conditions....or conditions where the snow is wet enough it compresses into ice. This company makes universal screw in stud technology which is very interesting.

https://www.gripstuds.com/index.php

For me....tire technology has come a LONG ways and the need for studs or chains keeps decreasing as tire companies adopt better rubber compounds and siping patterns in off the shelf tires.
 

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Born 120 years too late.
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4,089 Posts
Discussion Starter #44
FOR ICE conditions I have a cheat ready.

A box of small hex head sheet metal screws with the screwdriver slot and a battery driver.

If bad ice conditions, in the heavy part of the tread, you can screw in the hex heads for instant studded tires. The more screws the better it works
and
if you get them, get the ones with a screwdriver slot because the heads will round off and can be a bear to remove, the slot head helps.
HIGHLY ILLEGAL in most states including Michigan
and
you need really good tires with lots of tread although that should be readily apparent,
but
considering the price of body work and wrecker fees vs the price of a ticket, IF you are caught, it is a no brainer. I only ever had to do this once and it is spooky good BUT, while you can stop better and actually steer, you still need to remember you are on ice and stopping 4000lbs with some sheet metal screws on ice doesn't stop you on a dime.

People will stop and stare at your amazing ability to go without chains.:D:
 

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Born 120 years too late.
Joined
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4,089 Posts
Discussion Starter #45
Chains can help in certain situations, but I have lived in the mountains of the west for 30+ years and have never needed them on a 4wd vehicle.

I do think they have a place in ICE conditions. In snow, chains only work well when you can still 'dig' down to the road base for traction. Once you start having to push snow with the axles, front bumper, and then grill ( in the right conditions ) they lose a lot of effectiveness and you start using a LOT of fuel to do it.

My personal solution for deep snow conditions is lower air pressure in the tires. With the right setup and conditions, snow depth doesn't really matter anymore. You can get get the vehicle to float enough on the snow that it isn't pushing too much snow to maintain forward progress. In my experience this is faster and more efficient with fuel. It does typically require larger tires, but is still amazingly effective on normal vehicles. On a specialized vehicle it is frankly amazing what you can do.

I'd love to build a specialty set of studded flotation tires for extremely icy conditions....or conditions where the snow is wet enough it compresses into ice. This company makes universal screw in stud technology which is very interesting.

https://www.gripstuds.com/index.php

For me....tire technology has come a LONG ways and the need for studs or chains keeps decreasing as tire companies adopt better rubber compounds and siping patterns in off the shelf tires.
IF I get to where chains would help in snow, I make my own.
I carry heavy rope in my truck box and you put it through the wheel holes and tie it off. Do it for each wheels slot. I have some 2" heavy hemp rope. It is temporary but it really works,
then
when you get out of the deep, you just cut it away or untie it depending on what knot you used.
 

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Registered
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IF I get to where chains would help in snow, I make my own.
I carry heavy rope in my truck box and you put it through the wheel holes and tie it off. Do it for each wheels slot. I have some 2" heavy hemp rope. It is temporary but it really works,
then
when you get out of the deep, you just cut it away or untie it depending on what knot you used.
That is a good old school trick to have up your sleeve.

A lot of newer vehicles have a brake package so large that you can no longer pass anything through the wheel though. Just something to keep an eye out for.

If you haven't tried airing down the tires yet, I'd encourage you to give it a try.
 

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Semper Fi
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8,574 Posts
That is a good old school trick to have up your sleeve.

A lot of newer vehicles have a brake package so large that you can no longer pass anything through the wheel though. Just something to keep an eye out for.

If you haven't tried airing down the tires yet, I'd encourage you to give it a try.
Not just newer, my 2007 has rotors so large they basically fill the backside of my factory 18" wheels.
 
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