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Preparing for tomorrow
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I read a good post by Vincent on 9 Staples that will last forever. Maple Syrup will last forever if frozen. That got me thinking... What foods don't do well when frozen.

Vincent's post
http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=154979

Foods that don't do well when frozen from Pioneer Thinking.
http://www.pioneerthinking.com/dth_freezerfoods.html

DON'T FREEZE WELL:

--Greasy foods (they just become greasier)

--Cake icings made with egg whites

--Cream fillings and soft frostings

--Pies made with custard or cream fillings

--Fried foods (they tend to lose their crispness and become soggy)

--Fruit jelly on sandwiches may soak into the bread

--Soft cheese, such as cream cheese (can become watery)

--Mayonnaise (it separates; use salad dressing instead)

--Sour cream (it becomes thin and watery)

--Potatoes cooked in soups and stews (they become mushy and may darken. If using potatoes, cook until barely soft and still firm; then freeze quickly.)

CHANGE DURING FREEZING:

--Gravies and other fat-based sauces may separate and need to be Recombined by stirring or processing in the blender

--Thickened sauces may need thinning after freezing; thin with broth or milk

--Seasonings such as onions, herbs and flavorings used in recipes can change during freezing. These are best added during reheating to obtain accurate flavors

--Vegetables, pastas and grains used in cooked recipes usually are softer after freezing and reheating (undercook before freezing, or add when dish is reheated)

--Heavy cream can be frozen if used for cooking, but will not whip

--Some yogurts may suffer texture changes

--Raw vegetables lose their crispness, but can be used for cooking, stews, etc.

--Many cheeses change texture in the freezer. Most hard cheeses turn crumbly (which makes them okay for grating, but not for slicing).
 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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I think potatoes have always been my sticking point. I love to make large batches and freeze serving sized portions for quick meals later. No matter how I prepare them, potatoes always come out mealy and grainy after freezing. Yet I use a lot of potatoes as side dishes. I notice this even in commercial frozen foods too, so I guess it's a pretty universal problem.
 

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I have failed to store near enough gravy for post SHTF and I do so love gravy.

Good list Swede!

Why would you store gravy it's so easy to make cheaper too?
water+ cooked drippings/stock+ rue or corn starch or flour

How many people here can cook I mean actually cook... make sauces, take flour and make that flour into something edible...bread, noodles, whatever?

being able to cook for yourself and i mean more than boiling rice or re hydrating food is a real survival skill
 

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I've found recently that some jars of pickles and Worcestershire sauce will overflow when frozen, increasing their concentration. The top will still show that it's sealed when thawed though.

Cans with pull tops can burst or even slightly separate.

Canned pasta such as Beefaroni can separate making a very watery soup and rubbery noodles.
 

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Krazy Kitty
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I've found recently that some jars of pickles and Worcestershire sauce will overflow when frozen, increasing their concentration. The top will still show that it's sealed when thawed though.

Cans with pull tops can burst or even slightly separate.

Canned pasta such as Beefaroni can separate making a very watery soup and rubbery noodles.
Why on earth would you think of freezing any of that?
 

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I freeze broth (and fat, separately) from all meat I cook. It can be thawed and turned into soup or gravy.

When I get a good deal on carrots and celery, I chop it up (small) and freeze in gallon Ziploc bags to put into homemade soup, fried rice, etc.

Just these 2 things have saved us a lot of money.
 
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