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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone have suggestions of getting rid of these blood suckers in the house ?We have dogs indoors and just moved into this old house 3 months ago and to be truthful I think the fleas were already present .They seem to come out at night and work us over in bed. They seem to find mamma especially sweet and tender.
There are a few on the dogs ,but not to the degree that they would leave them for us...We've just discovered some mice in the walls and they might just be the host.I've read some online stuff and just checking for first hand experience.I've sprayed the dogs and dipped them and considering the environment in which we live doing anything outside will not be feasable.
They're on two levels and upstairs the dogs aren't even allowed to go and there they are ,so any advice gang...?
 

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Hello, I tried to help a friend get rid of fleas. Water traps, bombs, spray... they all work for a little while, but the fleas always come back.

Honestly, the only solution I've found, as experienced as a kid and living with my parents, was Orkin ( http://www.orkin.com/ ). They tried all of the above before calling, and nothing worked. Orkin uses stuff that chemically neuters the fleas and prevents eggs from hatching. Once the current generation dies out, there will be no more.

The problem for you and me is that the general public can only get stuff that's weak; the pros with the training have the powerful stuff that actually works.

Josh
 

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First, trap your mice. Then:
1) Remove all pets from house.
2) Strip all bedding and furniture covers. Bug bomb the house.
3) Vacuum all carpets very thoroughly. Put a flea collar in the bag to kill everything that gets sucked up or burn the bag when done.
4) Wash everything, hot cycle. Bedding, clothing, furniture covers. If it can't be washed, dry clean it. If it can't be dry cleaned, tumble it in the drier, hottest cycle for an hour. Empty the lint trap every load and burn the lint.
5) Flea dip all pets yet again. Apply species specific flea collar. Now you can let them back into the house.
6) I like to sprinkle flea powder around favorite resting places, inside and out.

That should do it. :)
 

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Everything TMcArthur said, then add a few flea bombs to the house while you're out for a day...

We did this when we first noticed the fleas - all gone reasonably quick.
 

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Borax works really well and is non poisonous.
I was told about this at a garden shop.

I sprinkled it all over the house and yard. After a day or so I would vacuum it up for the visible areas but left it under the sofa, behind furniture etc. It is not an immediate fix but it defiantly worked. It does not killed then. For some reason, they don't like it and they will leave.

I have used flea bombs too and it works but the family and pets have to leave for several hours.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
First, trap your mice. Then:
1) Remove all pets from house.
2) Strip all bedding and furniture covers. Bug bomb the house.
3) Vacuum all carpets very thoroughly. Put a flea collar in the bag to kill everything that gets sucked up or burn the bag when done.
4) Wash everything, hot cycle. Bedding, clothing, furniture covers. If it can't be washed, dry clean it. If it can't be dry cleaned, tumble it in the drier, hottest cycle for an hour. Empty the lint trap every load and burn the lint.
5) Flea dip all pets yet again. Apply species specific flea collar. Now you can let them back into the house.
6) I like to sprinkle flea powder around favorite resting places, inside and out.

That should do it. :)
lot's of good suggestions however the part of the world we live in doesn't know what a bug bomb is unless it's a crop duster and carpet is almost unheard of and very,very few folks have hot water ,seriously and well you can guess about a dry cleaner so we're back to the drawing board.and the Orkin man ,well he'd have to be dedicated to a 2500 mile road trip.Fleas got round 1
 

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Then try this. A lot of grocery stores have it. It is inexpensive, and leaves the house spelling nice. I tried it and it works.

It won't kill eggs so you wiil need to keep applying it till all the fleas leave but they will. You can even sprinkle some in the bed between the sheet and mattress, under sofa cushions etc.



Here are some links about it.

http://www.ehow.com/way_5445308_borax-rid-fleas.html

http://www.ehow.com/how_4798509_use-borax-rid-fleas-safely.html

http://www.dailypuppy.com/articles/borax-to-get-rid-of-fleas/c7614f76-e91f-61f5-2467-04c91c9b2bee

They say that is does kill the fleas so maybe I was wrong when I said that it doesn't kill them.
 

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Fleas have to have a host (mammals) to lay their eggs. Get the dogs on flea medicine from the vet. The medicine makes the dog stink to a flea and they won't lay their eggs.

We had a major flea problem years ago and put sevin dust on the carpet over night. Vacuumed the next day. Repeated about once a week for several weeks until they were gone.

KEEP PETS AND PEOPLE AWAY FROM THE SEVIN DUST. IT IS A POISON.
 

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I had a really bad problem with fleas at a house I was renting 15 years ago. Just going out into the grass they would cover your legs.

I bought an insecticide that was supposed to kill fleas in a bottle that you attached to the garden hose and sprayed down the yard 4 times and killed all of them living in the yard.

For in the house I went with a powder that was supposed to kill fleas and ticks and I covered the carpets with it about 3 times a week let it sit for a few hours and then vacuum.

For the dog I bought a big burlap bed full of cedar shavings.

Within a month to a month and a half I could not find a sign of a flea anywhere. I kept up with powder just to be sure. I wish I could tell you the names of the products I used, but it has been fifteen years and I have no idea, they were nothing special though I bought them at WalMart or something in the pet section.

Here are a couple of links on fleas that will help you understand what you are dealing with....

http://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flea

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flea
 

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Growing up we had one dog, out of many over the years, that had fleas. we started feeding her a small amount of fresh garlic every day. After a few days the garlic makes its way to the dogs skin, either the odor or the oil or both, I dunno but the fleas left the dog and were gone. Try buying some of the minced garlic and mixing a spoon full into the dogs meals each day, and while your at it mix it into your family dinner. It tastes great, is good for you, and might help with the unwanted pests.

I am not saying this will be a perfect fix all plan, but it wont hurt any and it will definitely get them off the dogs. Good luck, and let us know what works.
 
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For fleas you need to do two things regularly:

a) De flea your pets by using flea treatments - the ones from the vets are the best, collars really dont work well especially for pets who are allergic to fleas. This usually needs to be done once a month. I use a spot on type flea treatment that also covers lung worm that they can pick up from slugs and snails (ie from trails from slugs etc).

b) Spray the house floors, especially by the walls, the dogs bedding. This needs to be done regularly following the instructions on the tins. Fly spray probably wont work very well for fleas. The vets will also sell one that is good.

The flea lays its eggs in the carpet and they can stay dormant for months until the host comes in and then will hatch. They are more active in hot weather or heated homes. They may come in on cats more then dogs, but they can live on dogs or cats. They will bite humans, but as far as I know cant live on humans.

If you dont want to use spot on, you can get medicated shampoos but that means you have to wash the dog regularly following the instructions, but as most owners know, some dogs dont like getting that wet. :)


If you have fish tanks, you need to cover these with towels so non of the poisonous air can get into the fish tanks when using a spray. Also remember to spray the attic/loft as well.

When we spray here, we do upstairs first and then let that settle during the day, then last thing at night we spray downstairs. My dog gets a spot on once a month.


PS In the Uk you can pick up reasonably good flea treatments and sprays from the larger Pet store chains.
 

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lot's of good suggestions however the part of the world we live in doesn't know what a bug bomb is unless it's a crop duster and carpet is almost unheard of and very,very few folks have hot water ,seriously and well you can guess about a dry cleaner so we're back to the drawing board.and the Orkin man ,well he'd have to be dedicated to a 2500 mile road trip.Fleas got round 1
I'm guessing you're in africa or the depths of the outback or something. As such I don't know what you have access to. Can you buy flea powder or spoton bottles over there?

Can you buy teatree oil over there? if you can, wash the animals in a dog bath with a tablespoonful of the stuff in it. You can mix it into shampoo. it upsets the parasites. Do the laundry with it if you can.

if not...

Sweep daily, especially corners. wash the floors with handy andy or similar hard core cleaner. If you can buy flea powder at all use it and sprinkle it. Any rugs take outside and beat, leave hanging over the washing line in the sun.

Wash everything you are able to wash in as hot water as you can, and then dry it ON THE WASHING LINE. Even if you have to drape it over a fence, get it out in the sunlight. Sunlight kills flea eggs.

Historically people boiled their clothes before washing - boiled them up in a copper and then spooned them into a tub with suds, washed, rinsed, hung out. This boiling killed parasites. Cooked any nit or flea eggs, and there are more parasites than that in the world. We are lucky we modern people get away with the way we live. If you have access to a big copper, boiling the linens for a few minutes would do wonders.

Getting rid of fleas is not that difficult really. A house can be quite infested but that can reduce very fast. Keep the place dry and aerated, and clean.

PS: just reread your op - you say 'doing something outside will not be feasible." What do you mean? What sort of place are you in?
 

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the fact that you say they come out at night makes me wonder if they are fleas or if fleas are not your only problem. check your mattress at the edges and tiny folds in the corners for bugs. you may have bedbugs instead or as well!
do you have access to a vacuum cleaner with a hose end? you can cut down on the flea eggs left around by vigorous vacuuming of all surfaces at least every other day and wash the dogs and your linens at least once a week. if the eggs aren't around to hatch there will be fewer fleas. you can get flea preventative through the mail by ordering on the internet. read up on the life cycle of fleas (and maybe bedbugs too!) if you understand the life cycle of the pest/s you are dealing with you will be better prepared to figure out a way to stop the cycle. best wishes
 

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Did a bit of research:

The good news is that there are effective, safe ways to address the flea population where it counts and not make everyone sick in doing so. There are two main areas to address the major segments of the flea population, the eggs and larvae (remember, they're 85% of the population).

Outdoors
Let's start with the outdoor environment first. If your animals spend a fair amount of time in a grassy yard, there is a biological control that can be used to prey on the flea larvae in the soil. A nematode, which is a tiny worm, is applied via lawn sprayer, and, within 24 hours, brings about a 90% decrease in the number of flea larvae. Nationally available is a product from GardensAlive! called Flea Control Nematodes. In Austin, there’s ANTidote, which preys on fire ants as well as fleas! (A real boon here in Texas) They're sold through pet stores and garden suppliers, like The Natural Gardener. They have no adverse affect on anything but the pest, and they have the side benefit of helping in the garden against cutworms and grubs. As with all biological controls, the predators need to be reintroduced periodically, because they eat all the prey species and die off for lack of food. Follow the label instructions, which usually recommend wetting the soil well before application, to give the nematodes a good start.

Indoors
In the household, we have two choices, depending on the type of flooring.

Mostly carpet: In this case, you can do a very inexpensive treatment that gets to the larvae quite effectively without much risk of resistance developing and without significant toxicity to people or pets. There are a number of boric acid products on the market that are variously marketed as flea controllers or carpet deodorizers. They work by putting a powder in the carpet that remains there even after vacuuming (because of the fine particle size). Flea larvae are killed by contacting the borate power, yet the mammals in the house are safe due to its extremely low toxicity. One of the best products is Fleago Natural Flea Control. I also have good reports of people applying good 'ole 20 Mule Team Borax(sold as a detergent booster for washing clothes)! These products are applied by shaking the powder on the carpet until it turns lightly white, brushing it in with a broom, and then vacuuming the carpet. Most applications are good for a year. It's best not to inhale the dust as you are working it in, so wearing a mask is advised, as is removing the animals during application. If you shampoo your carpet, you'll of course have to repeat the application.

Mostly bare floors: There is a very safe chemical called Nylar, which is a flea growth regulator. This is sprayed on floors, kennels, bedding, and any furniture that is commonly used as a resting place for the pet. Its action is to prevent eggs from hatching and larvae from molting to adults. It does this by mimicking a juvenile hormone in the insect, and keeps the young from ever becoming adults. As you remember, this is the goal of successful flea control. Once a year application should be sufficient in most cases, unless floors or kennels are washed or exposed to rain. It is difficult to find this chemical alone. It is often combined with adulticides (read: poisons). So it becomes imperative for consumers to be label detectives. The folks at GardensAlive! have what I used to sell in my office, a product called I.G. Regulator, which is an ounce concentrate that treats 1500 square feet, and
is free of adulticides.

The key indoors seems to be thinking of all the places where your pet rests. These are all places where flea eggs, laid on the pet by the feeding female, roll off and try to get a new generation started. If the sofa is a dog bed, the cushions need to be pulled and the crack between back and seat treated with borates or Nylar. If your cat climbs into bed with you, normal washing of bedding in hot water and drying in the dryer is sufficient to prevent this area from becoming a breeding ground.
 

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First tip. If you have carpet, get rid of it. Hardwood floors and lineoleum are much easier to clean. Carpet is a filthy collector of all kinds of bugs, even if you do not have pets. Not only does it attract fleas but it also attracts dust mites. I have never had carpet and would NEVER consider carpet as a floor covering.

IMO, it is best to apply a monthly spot-on topical such as Advantage, Revolution, K-9 Advantix, Frontline Plus, Capstar, Assurity, Vectra 3D, TriForce or Promeris. If you have a bad infestation, it may take 2 months to eliminate the problem on your pets. Therefore, you can use both a topical spot-on treatment as well as Capstar to alleviate the problem sooner. Please research and know what you are doing if you are not administering medication under the supervision of a vet.

By applying flea medication monthly you avoid the flea issue entirely. Flea medication should be given all year long. However, in cold climates, it may be possible to treat only from May through October. However, as bad as the insect problems have been in the past few years, I would not recommend skipping winter months even in a cold climate.

Program is a monthly flea medication which is given orally with food. This is a good option if you are treating ferals. However, you have to monitor their eating to make sure that the animals are not playing musical chairs with their bowls, in which case one animal might get too much and the others not enough.

Sevin (the insecticide used on gardens) can be safely used to treat fleas on floors (carpet and hardwood), furniture, bedding, and even the pets themselves. Read the fine print on the back of the package. If applying to pets, take precaution to avoid the eyes, ears, nose and mouth. Do NOT apply more often than every 7 days. Do not use at the same time with a spot-on topical.

Sevin can be used on puppies and kittens by following those precautions. In fact, Sevin or flea shampoo are the most viable options for treating puppies and kittens since spot-on topicals should not be used until the pets are 8 weeks old. (Also, no spot-on topicals on a nursing mother or sick animal unless a vet okays it.)

I use old sheets or blankets on my furniture and then just wash them every couple of days. This is to avoid vacuuming fur from the furniture but also prevents fleas from hatching.

Fleas can get into your house even if you do not own pets. Fleas hop on humans in the grass and get into your house that way.
 

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If you have pets, try putting a real little bit of vinegar in their water every day. Just a real little bit. It's supposed to make the fleas not like them as a host.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I'm guessing you're in africa or the depths of the outback or something. As such I don't know what you have access to. Can you buy flea powder or spoton bottles over there?


PS: just reread your op - you say 'doing something outside will not be feasible." What do you mean? What sort of place are you in?
Well, HIGH mountain tropical Alpine jungle rainy type of yard that either is up or down depending on which way your heading:)
We have access to most types of powders and spot treatments and the vets are easy to get along with here and I sleep somewhere between Noreaga and the Panama Canal:sleep:
We have to spray this week ,just have to get dried out with an avg of two inches of rain a day it's a challenge.
 
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