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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I see many people review bright flashlights, like Thrunite TN32, TN36, TN40, OLIGHT SR52UT, but all those reviews just say its not a bushcraft flashlight, wouldnt you want more light in the wilderness at night even if it weighs a little extra?
 

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I don't have one yet, I'm look hard at the Petzl headlamp that has a red LED. The current flashlight that I use in the woods at night is a cheapie Remington branded bloodlight. for $16, I've gotten 3 years of good use out of it.
 

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"Everbody has a plan . .&quot
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Seconds on both headlamps & red lens.
BUT . . . I found out accidentally (like I do most things) that red lenses may not be perfect in the brush. One late afternoon hike ended up lasting past dark.
Seems ALL the Flora looks exactly alike under red light. I found it very difficult to distinguish between the trail and sections where rainwater had eroded the sides. Everything all looked exactly alike under red.
Switching back to white, I could easily tell what was runoff spots & what was the trail.
Learning experience for me & since then, I like to have both options available & my current almost weightless headlamp provides both.
 

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Wearing fur underwears...
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Ic Rafe has a good point; it doesn't take much to wreck night vision, but quite a while to build it up.

For me, I like something simple with 2 power settings for a flashlight and a few on a headlamp with a red light.
 

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Third World'er Lunatic
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actually ya need less, Brite light carries far in the dark rural areas, and kills your night vision. ya ever wonder why you see all the stars out camping, but none in tha city? 35 miles from charleston, and if I look that direction at night, I can see the light pollution glow.......

Ive got a older sure fire St Minimus with the colored shields(red green and blue) , one
of of the surefire military lights, with the phelonic body and red lens filter, and a old Millennium weapons light system from surefire. none of it the best and brightest out there anymore. But all of it dependable and usable. and I got it all secondhand, which saved cost.
I do have a couple of pentagon lights, red led, the S219LED's, one in my bag, one in girlchilds for reading at night when we are out and about, and I got Had at a auction sight on a couple of Hellfighter flashlights, Not bad lights, Brite , solid, seem to be holding up, But the Hellfighters were sold then for around 125$ a pop, they got busted for bringing in a cheap import (less than 20$) badge-ing and boxing em, and selling em for 125$ and up a couple of years ago, I paid 20$ with shipping for 2, and I use em for work lights, but I wouldn't trust em more than any other cheap flashlight.

my foster son, works at Boeing here, They swear by the brand streamlight, or they have the contract anyway, I have a couple of their headlamps seem to work ok, BUT they do eat AAA batteries quick.

then I have the Half a dozen or so flashlights for Hurricane season, 4,6 and 8 Dcell Mag lights, they not so easy to lose, Plus, a decent club if you need one. and top it off with 4 of the old military DC (yellow) lanterns got em snapped onto clamps in each room. power out cut em on, lights up the whole room.

one thing i learned, specially if im out off the trail, those lil thumbtacks with the reflective paint on em? worth their weight in gold. mark your trail out, just shine your redlight coming back. 90 % of the population will never see em, but with any light they glow.
 

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Not sure if it qualifies as a "bushcraft light" but the Nitecore SRT3 Defender has a red light (also blue) and a nice adjuster ring for the white light. Tail clicky and all other adjustments and mode changes done via the twist ring.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Only politics *****.
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I don't have one yet, I'm look hard at the Petzl headlamp that has a red LED. The current flashlight that I use in the woods at night is a cheapie Remington branded bloodlight. for $16, I've gotten 3 years of good use out of it.
The Petzl Tactikka+ is the one i have. That's the one with red led, white led, with 3 brightness settings and pulse option.

6471: Indeed, it does depend, so i take a headlight with both options too. Sometimes you need to be able to actually see, but then i use the lowest brightness available to see what i need to see too. A bright directed beam makes you focussed too much on the point where it hits in my opinion.
 

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In Memory
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IMHO..... get a flashlight..... that a solar charged battery pack or folding solar panel will recharge.



Combo below + small flashlight has worked well for me.

 
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A good head lamp can be as cheap as $10-$12. I got a Duracell from Lowe's. On clearance. Used it for work and night time outdoorsy stuff. Has 4 settings and one is red light.
 

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reluctant sinner
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I like my Streamlight headlamp tridents. 3 AAA. One green led 270 hours, 2 white leds 125 hours, 1 Xenon a couple of hours. I got them pre-911. I just replaced part of the elastic head band as it was getting weak.

I have a 3 AAA hand held with 5 blue leds for tracking blood.

I like Eneloop's and have a solar charger for them.

I wear a Streamlight Nano and a Photon II on my necklace 24/7.

On my car key is a Nano. On the rest of the key ring I have a micro usb rechargeable single white adjustable output led Nightcore Niteforce off Amazon for like $15.
 

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In Memory
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It should be obvious. :)

If you want a modern day torch?

Use a lightweight metal handle near 36 inches long, with something on the order of a bicycle grip on the end you hold, with multiple wraps of thick carbon fiber felt as the fuel absorbent material on the end you light.

Carbon fiber felt will not burn. So your torch is reusable.

Carbon fiber felt is also a nonflammable wick replacement for wick burning lanterns.

 

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Patiently Waiting
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I have dozens of flashlights and headlamps. My go to combo is the Fenix HL50 and an older LD40. Both are neutral white light and run off AA's. Best lights I have for outdoors at this moment.
 

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If I were to choose from my collection.....

Fenix HP25 - gives me multiple lumen levels and an LED for Flood & a separate LED for Spot. Great for hands free.

My hand light would be a Armytek Predator with warm light. Programmable with very low low lumens and fairly bright on the other end of the spectrum. This light is a thrower, so you can spot things from a distance without bumping up the lumens.
 

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I have dozens of flashlights and headlamps. My go to combo is the Fenix HL50 and an older LD40. Both are neutral white light and run off AA's. Best lights I have for outdoors at this moment.
Very similar and I like the versatility. My favorite headlamps for outdoors (yeah, I guess that includes "bushcraft"), are the Fenix HL50, the Steamlight Sidewinder Compact II and the very tiny little Petzl e+LITE (strictly for backpacking).

The HL50 and Sidewinder are unique in that they use both AA and CR123 (the Sidewinder will also run off a AAA). The Sidewinder, has a few brightness settings, but also with red, blue (or green) and an IR LED (if you need that).

What most people don't realize is you don't need extremely bright lights, outside of search and rescue or the off-chance you need to hike out before sunrise or just late getting to your campsite at night.

Filtered lenses or red LEDs do help to preserve your night vision, but it's been proven that a variable white light, where you use the minimum needed doesn't affect your night vision as much and still allows a better spectrum to read maps and distinguish flora colors and depth.

Of course, most backpackers and bushcrafters are often in bed not longer after sundown...the need for a light is only for the 0300 Mother Nature calls:D: Seriously though, you a low-powered (and longer lasting) or variable output LED is vastly more useful than a single output, 900+lumen, battery-burning torch.

ROCK6
 

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Nil Mortis Sin Lucri
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Currently, my goto headlamp ( I have two) in the GHB and BOB, is a rayovac I picked up a couple years ago for $15 a piece :)

http://www.rayovac.com/Lights/Outdoor-Lights/5-LED-3AAA-9-in-1-Multi-Function-Headlight.aspx

I EDC a Streamlight Protac 1L, and have inova lights on each set of keys as well. Picked up one of the cheap Bushnell pocket lights (1AAA) from Walmart recently, and it's plenty for most everyday needs IMO.

At work I keep a Princton tec Fred which I like as it initially comes on with the red led's (I work nights). http://princetontec.com/fred
 

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King of Canada
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4,421 Posts
If you want a modern day torch?

Use a lightweight metal handle near 36 inches long, with something on the order of a bicycle grip on the end you hold, with multiple wraps of thick carbon fiber felt as the fuel absorbent material on the end you light.

Carbon fiber felt will not burn. So your torch is reusable.

Carbon fiber felt is also a nonflammable wick replacement for wick burning lanterns.

Got a video of one in action? Never heard of this and it sounds like an interesting experiment.
 

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Human bean of planet Urf
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I've got literally dozens of lights. Probably will never use most but I'm a collector and I can't pass one by to try it out. My fav "walking in the woods" light is still an old rubber coated Gordon, has either six or seven LED's, and is about equal to a 1 watter. Maybe 50 lumens?
 
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