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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a rechargeable hair clipper that only charges if I wiggle and bend the power cord coming into it, so I have a broken/shorting wire in there somewhere. The issue is right at the base of the male plug that connects to the DC jack (female) of the clipper. If I could cut the wire an inch below the plug and either move the existing plug or attach a new one, I should be back in business.

A new charger (wall wart with cord) is $14. I'm trying to decide between buy vs. repair. Does anyone dabble in this kind of repair who could point me to parts and/or tutorials to make a repair? I've looked at the plug and there are seams but nothing acts like it wants or is able to separate.



(My problem is at the base of the DC plug
where the 2 wires enter)

Thanks!​
 

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human
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Those dc plugs are available at radio shack. They come in at least two sizes, and probably more. Unless it's marked somewhere on the wall wart or the shaver that indicates polarity you'll need to determine which is + and which is -.

To replace the plug you'll need a couple of inches of solder and a soldering iron.

However, my experience have often shown the problem to be in the female jack. Wiggling the plug in the jack often causes a break on a printed circuit board which the jack is soldered on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Those dc plugs are available at radio shack. They come in at least two sizes, and probably more. Unless it's marked somewhere on the wall wart or the shaver that indicates polarity you'll need to determine which is + and which is -.

To replace the plug you'll need a couple of inches of solder and a soldering iron.

However, my experience have often shown the problem to be in the female jack. Wiggling the plug in the jack often causes a break on a printed circuit board which the jack is soldered on.
I originally thought it was the female jack as well but if I hold the plug and clipper together (to prevent any movement) and gently move the wire you will hear and see the motor surge. So I'm 99% certain it is the wire where it enters the plug but will double check.
 

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I originally thought it was the female jack as well but if I hold the plug and clipper together (to prevent any movement) and gently move the wire you will hear and see the motor surge. So I'm 99% certain it is the wire where it enters the plug but will double check.
That sounds like an open-circuit, not a short circuit. Both can cause fires. If you don't know the difference, you should not be attempting this repair except under the direct supervision of someone who knows what they are doing or you might go from bad to worse.
 

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What you have is a coaxial type connector and they are widely available. If you look closely at the cord, one side of it has ridges on it. Cut the connector off and then ohm it out with a meter. Then simply solder a new one back on.

Do you know any ham radio operators? Most of them will repair this for you for nothing, at least I would...
 

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If I had a voice I'd sing
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This is not hard to fix, the safety-nazis don't need to worry.

Just get some heat shrink, a soldering iron and some small solder and flux. Cut the wires at the bad spot, strip them and twist together, But don't forget to slip the heat shrink over it before you twist the wire together.

Hold the iron under the bare wire (but touching it, so the wire is resting on the iron). When the wire is hot enough, put some flux on it, it will sizzle off, then touch the solder onto it, if the wire is hot enough the solder will melt onto the wire. Get it good and coated. The idea is to heat the wire hot enough that it will melt the solder, you don't want to melt the solder with the iron itself.

Then slip the heat shrink over the splice, hold a lighter under it and it will shrink up nice and tight around the splice.

Repeat with the other wire.

This is a good skill to have, and you won't ever learn it if you don't do it.

If you want a tutorial, go here.

Adafruit is a great site for buying the equipment you will need, or you can get it at Lowes, Radio Shack, etc.

Edit:
I reread the post and saw that it is the plug, not the wire, but the concept is the same.

You could also cut a plug (that is the same size) from an old AC adapter and splice the wires. I have done this many times and never throw out old AC adapters for this reason, just make sure you get the polarity right by checking with an ohm/volt meter. Almost always, the + is the inside and the - is the outside on those connectors. Also, usually the + wire will have some identifying marks on it that may be hard to see at first, like white dashes.
 

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Dumpster Diver
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my wide could fix this in 3 minutes,

just get a 99 cent or 2 for a buck connector of the same diameter ar radios shack (take the unit with you to try the fit of the plug, there are at least 3 sizes and cut the old plug off an replace it,

and no,, Safety Nazi... a 1500 milliamp 9 VDC wall wart is not going to hurt anybody or anything,, but if you had some 00000 steel wool and held the cut ends ofthe 2 wires to it,, you could start a fire if your Bic dies..

that would be fun..

the radio Shack clerk will prolly replace it for you for free, give the kid a buck or two \while you are there have him try another Walwart,in it .., I still suspect the female jacks connection to the PC board..
 

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reluctant sinner
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+1 sarco2000 You do not learn anything buying a new unit at the store. Learning to do simple repairs will save you money plus when times are tough you will be able to get by on less. Also the stores might not have anything to sell, it would be handy to be able to repair your stuff back into service. Scrap parts are a gold mine for capable - just trash for unprepared or ignorant.
 

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If push comes to shove, find a male and female connector pair at your nearest hardware/radio store.

Open the clippers, remove female connector and solder a small pigtail of wire - making sure you know which is pos and neg. solder the new MALE connector to the other end of this pigtail.

Solder the new FEMALE connector onto the wall-wart cable, ensuring polarity matches to male connector on clippers.

Problem solved -with a solution that will last longer before breaking again.

BTW - before the WTF's and "You are wrongs" - the reason you put the female connector on the live side is jus in case the wall-wart decides to go thermonuclear on you and send 110/220 volts to your device.......... The recessed connector means that the clippers go BANG!!! Not you when you accidentally touch the end of the connector.
 

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Colt43
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zuren - before you go to all the trouble of fixing... The back of the transformer says output is 5vdc and 100ma - this is a very common size and you may have one pluged into something else. Different voltage and amperages have different ends. However, most 5vdc and 100 ma units should have the same end.
cdevier
 

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human
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Back in the mid 70s to almost the mid 80s I serviced consumer electronics. Those coaxial dc connectors were already very common. Back then there were two sizes (don't recall.. but they were both metric) Most all the Japan imports such as Sony, Panasonic, Sanyo, Pioneer, Kenwood and others used these, in a wide voltage range (depending on battery requirements) anywhere from 4.5 to 12vdc and there wasn't a rule about the way they were wired polarity wise.

Some were configured to disconnect the batteries when running on the wall wart and some were set up to both run the item as well as charge the batteries.
Those that also charged the batteries tended to have higher current ratings.
 

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I have a rechargeable hair clipper that only charges if I wiggle and bend the power cord coming into it, so I have a broken/shorting wire in there somewhere. The issue is right at the base of the male plug that connects to the DC jack (female) of the clipper. If I could cut the wire an inch below the plug and either move the existing plug or attach a new one, I should be back in business.

A new charger (wall wart with cord) is $14. I'm trying to decide between buy vs. repair. Does anyone dabble in this kind of repair who could point me to parts and/or tutorials to make a repair? I've looked at the plug and there are seams but nothing acts like it wants or is able to separate.



(My problem is at the base of the DC plug
where the 2 wires enter)

Thanks!​


Their clippers are designed and MADE in Sterling Ill. That wall wart comes from china I'm sure. I can give you their parts phone number if you'd like to call for a new one OR fixing that one wouldn't be hard. :thumb:​
 

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they show you what the polarity is for the plug on the transformer.
look to the right of where it says made in china and you will see the diagram neg. is the outside pos. the inside
most all transformers have this
 
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