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Thanks
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, my mind is set. I am going to take the kids fishing this summer, multiple times. Age 5 and below

I don't know crap.

What should I learn? Where should I go or how do I find places to go to? What do I need to buy or acquire? What should I steer clear of?
Do you always need a permit?
How can I start this hobby as cheaply as possibly?
I know nothing. Fill me up with knowledge!
 

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Survival Actual
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You'll need a fishing license from your state, and most states now require a FIN ID, which is free, and should be available to get at your states internet website. I printed out my FIN on my printer, and attached it to my fishing license, in case the park ranger asks for it.

You'll also need reels, rods, fishing line, lures, bobbers, hooks, and bait(worms).
You can actually go to some stores(walmart) and pick up a cheap fishing starter kit which has a reel & rod, and some basic fishing lures n stuff.

Ebay is also a good place to get fishing stuff cheap. Or search google for Fishing Starter Kit, to get an idea what you're looking for.

You can also search google for basic fishing instructions which you can read or print out and take with you. Also learning fishing knots is a good idea. Google images has a bunch of fishing knot diagrams you can print out.

Good luck!

EDIT: i forgot the fishing license is available at walmart, or most other places that sell fishing gear...
 

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Here's my safety Sir
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In my state kids under 16 don't need a license. If it were here I would say get some cane poles and life preserver for each child. Head out to the waters edge have fun (well supervised fun for the little ones). find out what fish you have in the area and what's the best bait. Go cheap have fun and grow into it.
 

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Dog bites - Owner shoots
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Dougzilla said it.

Also: look out at garage sales. I cant say HOW MUCH gear I've aquired over the years doing that.

Quite honestly ... a strong stick ..... fishin line, hook and a worm ... cork for a bobber. under $2 and you will catch a fish. Ive messed with $10 lures and got frustrated, threw a bobber and a worm and caught a fish. ALOT to be said for simple, and high end gear is only worth it if you fish ALOT. :thumb:

Knowledge is most important. READ where fish go during times of the year and time of the day. All the other stuff is really dressing IMO.

Know where they are ... toss in a worm.

EDIT: After writing this it dawned upon me to make a 1" thick walking stick .... hollow out the handle (make a cork plug to top it) and put in line and hooks. On the go fishin pole! THX!

ps .... dont forget to learn how to clean em :upsidedown:
 

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I think I'd want to take someone along who is a good fisherman and could show us how to do it. Maybe some old man who enjoys teaching newbies and kids. Beats trying to learn it on your own through books or videos. Next best thing would be videos, I think. I don't know much about it either, but that's what I'd do.
 

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Maximus
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If legal in your area, use bread balls. Small fish eat that stuff up. Best bet to check on your local regulations is at your local Sports Authority, Outdoors store, or (yuck) Walmart. In the fishing sections there is usualy a free book on your local state regulations on fishing. It will let you know when permits are needed, what is legal bait etc.

Most of all, don't let it on that you don't know anything.... Kids won't know the difference LOL

OHHH make sure you learn a few fishing knots. Improved clinch or Palomar knots are easy and fast to learn. Simple overhand knots will weaken your line or slip out. You don't want that.
http://www.animatedknots.com/indexfishing.php

Final piece of advice... spend a little extra on good fishing line. Cheap rods are fune but if you get the cheap fishing line, it will have a lot of "line memory" and twist itself up REAL BAD when you go to use it. It is VERY FRUSTRATING for beginer fishers and kids. You wind up spending more time messing with knots than fishing. Go for a "braided" line or some other "low memory" line. Line memory is what makes the fishing line want to curl up even when you cast it.
 

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J the painter
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I'm a die hard fisherman and i agree with most of what was said a few things to keep in mind is find a pole that dosen't tangle easy for the kids tangleing poles an kids go hand and hand, also in my area they have places for just kids to fish and they really mop up, its a great place to start, its only fun for young kids when they are catching fish or at least once they catch a few they are hooked:)try a bass pro shop they will show you and let you play with all kind of stuff and not buy it just to see if it is what you need.

Have great fishing season and mop up , remember its all about those kiddos.
 

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Think bluegills for kids. Easy to catch and always some action.

If you really want to get them excited, get some strawberry Jello and cornmeal. Make the Jello to package directions then dump in enough cornmeal to make a dough. Put it on a hook, throw it in a flat rocky area, and catch huge carp...particulary effective in August.
 

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Well I would want to know what kind of fishing your doing.

For example fishing in a boart on a lake is completely different than on a shore. Also that is differnt than on a stream or river.

In my opinion the best way to fish with kids is to go boat fishing. You troll along for walleye or Stripers and usually everyone gets a fish or two. Also it is much easier to real in the kids when they get out of hand. They are only an arms lenth away. LOL. Also being on a slowly trolling boat is fun of it's own.

Next would be sitting on the shore with a bobber and some bait. Kids can play and keep an eye on their reel at the same time and you can relax with a beer.

River and stream fishing takes more skill IMHO. You have to know how to cast and reeling in with a spinner. You have to know where to try and get the lure/bait for fishto take it. Kids can get swept away if they aren;t carefull.

Flyfishing is the hardest and should be avoided unless you have some amazingly determined children and a giude/teacher.
 

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Really?
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Get everyone, including yourself the Zebco fishing kit.......includes pole, tackle box and lures........go to a pay lake( they'll tell you what bait to use and show you how to fish).........have fun.........take lots of pics........sunscreen,cooler, water, cool snacks, sunglasses, hats, lawn chairs, sweat towels......you will be a hero.
 

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Maximus
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Ok, my mind is set. I am going to take the kids fishing this summer, multiple times. Age 5 and below

I don't know crap.

What should I learn? Where should I go or how do I find places to go to? What do I need to buy or acquire? What should I steer clear of?
Do you always need a permit?
How can I start this hobby as cheaply as possibly?
I know nothing. Fill me up with knowledge!
Fishing 101!

I realized that you may not know ANYTHING about Fishing and so here is a little guide with pics to get you going :)

A) Types of rods.
Rods can range from $15-$500 plus. For your purposes, you are going to look at a few basic styles.

Cane Rod: Usually a bamboo rod. Think of Tom Sawyer fishing.
Pros= Cheap, simple
Cons= Can not fit a reel and harder to pull a fish out of the water


Spinning Gear, Spincaster Rod.
Pros= Lots of selection, most common types of rod, versitility
Cons= dizzying array of options
These are the most common rods you will see. They are made for spinning gear and spincaster reels (addressed later). They can be made from graphite, fiberglass, or plastic. The grips can be foam, rubber, or cork. They come in various legnths and "actions" (how bendy/stiff they get). Don't worry about "actions" for now. Those holes that the line goes through are called "guides". And they can come on 1 peice, 2 or 3 (even 4).


Baitcasting Rod.
Pros= generally considered to be a more accurate caster
Cons= More practice and only for baitcasting reels
These are rods meant to be used with Baitcasting Reels. Not really recommended for children or beginers though. I mean beginers CAN use them, but it takes a lot of practice to get used to using these. They differ from other fishing poles because the guides face upwards towards the sky and there is a "trigger" on the handle to help you hold the rod and reel in position.



B)Types of Reels
Reels also range from very inexpensive to very very expensive. I will skip Fly Reels for this post.

Spincaster
This is your "young childrens" reel. It is house in a rounded case. This is so the line doesn't fly off the spool unintentionally. Generally cheap to get. You push the button on the bottom and cast away. Meant to be used with spinning/spincasting rods.
Pros- Prevents "bird nesting" (big clumps of knots) of line, good for kids, cheap
Cons- Hard to change the type of line, line that comes with these are pretty cheap



Spinning Reel (conventional reel)
These are the most common reels. These are the ones you see most people fish with. The line wraps around the coil. To cast it, you lift up the bale (metal bar) and hold the line with your finger. Then you cast and release your finger all at once. It is meant to be used with Spinning/Spincaster rods.
Pros= Most common reel, various size reels, fairly inexpensive for low end models
Cons= Casting takes a few practice tosses to learn


Baitcaster
These are reels that work on a winch style concept. They come in round and "low profile". Round looks like a barrel and low profile looks like a spaceship lol. These are meant to be used with baitcasting rods ONLY. It has more winching power than the other reels but it takes a lot more practice to master and use effectively but is generally considered to be more accurate in casting.
Pros= winching power, accurate casting
Cons= More expensive, more practice to master, can "birds nest" easily




C) Types of Line
Fishing line comes in a variety of types and sizes. The size is reffered to as "test" and is measured in pounds. So a 4 lb. test line would break at 4 lb. pounds. It will be thinner than 8 lb. test line. Line can go past 125 lb. test. You will mainly be looking at 5-10 lb. test line. Here are the most common types.
Monofilament (Mono)
This is your most common line. Most people use this. It is cheap and inexpensive. The downside is that the cheap line has "memory" and will want to return to its round shape. There are low memory monofiliment lines (10-20$ a spool) that are more expensive.

Braided Line
Braided line is a stronger line than Monofilament. It is thinner also. So an 8lb test is thinner than an 8lb monofiliment line. The main advantage is its strenth and limpness. There is very little line memory so it makes for easy casting. You will probably look at 8-10lb test line. These are more expensive than monofiliment line though. Generally about 12-17$ a spool.



D) Basic Rigging
You will need line, a float (if you want), lead weights (splitshot) and a hook. Or you can skip the float and just dip the line and weight. You will need the weight to bring the hook under the water. Otherwise it may float to the top.




Putting it all together:

Look, I know this is MUCH MORE info than you needed. But this way you can kinda know what you are looking at in the store. For 5 year olds, the easiest is either a cane pole or a Spincaster. This will run you about 10-20$. But do yourself a favor and spring for the Braided line. It will make everything much easier and more enjoyable.

The cane poles are easy because they don't have to know anything to use it. Just dip the line in the water with a worm or breadballs. It is a LOT of fun and the kids enjoy it.

The Spincasters take a little more time to learn and you can run into frustrations with 5 year olds and younger.

My vote is to go for cane poles and braided lines. MUCH easier for you and the kids. Cheaper also. If they enjoy it more later, you can get different gear for them to use. But it will be a lot less headache for you going this route. (Personal Experience talking there lol) Just give them a cane pole, line, hook and let them dip away in the water and watch the fish go for the bait.
 

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Really?
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It takes a lifetime to learn how to fish and can be very frustrating( most times needing a boat- bank fishing is the most frustrating)........if time is a factor, go the easy route( like I suggested)........10-20-30 yrs from now, what will matter?
 

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When choosing your rod and reel go with push button. Much easier to cast and get use to. For kids and adults. I actully just got another pushbutton reel formyself. I flyfish and like complicated casting. But with kids it's all about eas of effort ad Letsgetreal says.
 

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In my state kids under 16 don't need a license. If it were here I would say get some cane poles and life preserver for each child. Head out to the waters edge have fun (well supervised fun for the little ones). find out what fish you have in the area and what's the best bait. Go cheap have fun and grow into it.
Definately have each child wear a life preserver!!! If you are anywhere near the water where there is a drop off. There are often weeds or other objects in the water than can and do trap people underwater.
Back in my medic days I had to listen to several family members tell me how their missing loved one was just sitting there, fell in the water and never came up and there's nothing anyone can do except wait for the dive team to recover the body.
Fishing is a lot of fun but keep it safe.
 

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Ok, my mind is set. I am going to take the kids fishing this summer, multiple times. Age 5 and below

I don't know crap.

What should I learn? Where should I go or how do I find places to go to? What do I need to buy or acquire? What should I steer clear of?
Do you always need a permit?
How can I start this hobby as cheaply as possibly?
I know nothing. Fill me up with knowledge!
Seems the basics are covered here but I want to tell you how proud of you I am. The decision to introduce your kids to the outdoors, spend time with them, and go outside your comfort area in doing so speaks volumes about your character. Good job, and keep us informed on how it goes!! To everybody else, there is a lesson here, take a kid fishing!!
 

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When my youngest was around 5 yrs of age? (maybe???? that was a long time ago)

He caught a 17 inch Northern Pike off a SNOOPY POLE!!!! (need I say more?)

Seriously.... start super duper cheap... Start with Cane Poles (line tied to a stick) And just try the shores edge. All else fails... they will get crawdads, and minnows.

Ya gotta start small... and work your way up. It's all about the 'baby steps'.
 

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Thanks
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Definately have each child wear a life preserver!!! If you are anywhere near the water where there is a drop off. There are often weeds or other objects in the water than can and do trap people underwater.
Back in my medic days I had to listen to several family members tell me how their missing loved one was just sitting there, fell in the water and never came up and there's nothing anyone can do except wait for the dive team to recover the body.
Fishing is a lot of fun but keep it safe.
Oh, please do not worry about that.
They wear their life jackets whenever they are near water. I even keep life jackets in the van in case we ever careen off a bridge and land in water.
Yes, I am that paranoid. :eek::
 

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If you're just starting out and don't know anything and you're with 5 year olds... using those small kiddie poles, small bobbers, long but small hooks, and a box of mealworms to catch bluegill will get you out there easier than anything.

Mealworms are about the easiest thing to run a hook through and will stay on your hook alot better than waxworms or traditional worms that look like small nightcrawlers. Bluegill don't bite like a bass, they go up and flare their gills to suck it into their mouth. Two bad things can happen here... first of all, worms without a tough skin can literally explode so they get the worm and you don't get the fish, or they'll suck it too far in and you lose your hook and severely hurt the fish if it's not a keeper. Longer hooks with mealworms help with this quite a bit.
 
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