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El Cid, I hate hippies.
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I'm going to be starting a garden this spring. It will be about 2 acres, I was wondering what types of vegetables you guys suggest for a first time grower. I'll be growing in western NY and I have a large tractor for all the grunt work, I've already done my soil samples etc. I have ample water, sunlight and all the neccessary's. I am just not sure what I want to grow, I am willing to can food as well. Any suggestions with a good supporting reason would be appreciated.
 

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garden

I'm going to be starting a garden this spring. It will be about 2 acres, I was wondering what types of vegetables you guys suggest for a first time grower. I'll be growing in western NY and I have a large tractor for all the grunt work, I've already done my soil samples etc. I have ample water, sunlight and all the neccessary's. I am just not sure what I want to grow, I am willing to can food as well. Any suggestions with a good supporting reason would be appreciated.
Not trying to be a wise-ass... grow what you and your family will eat.

Get some homesteading garden books from the library. Make a garden plan on paper. Plan your work then work your plan.:thumb:
 

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Not trying to be a wise-ass... grow what you and your family will eat.

Get some homesteading garden books from the library. Make a garden plan on paper. Plan your work then work your plan.:thumb:
Agreed. I know people who grow vegies they hate because they think they are supposed to. They end up giving away mountains of beans or whatever when they should have dedicated the space to stuff they actually WANT.

I'd suggest that the first year you grow easy crops like bush beans, peas, corn, tomatoes (not sure what the climate is like for you; how long is your growing season?), zucchini, pumpkins, beets. As you get the hang of it, buy some good survivalist gardening books and learn about other crops. One day you might even want to save your own seed, or even breed your own vegetable varieties. The skies the limit, but go easy at first or you may get sick of it and chuck it in.
 

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Mother of One.
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Tomatoes and peppers are pretty easy and fulfilling for a first time gardener. I would also go ahead and get some fruit/nut trees planted as you won't have to do much for the first year. Maybe some blackberries and/or raspberries, as they're nummy and good to make jelly with. I really want some spaghetti squash next year cause I like it, and they are big and filling. Look into planting some herbs as I find it great to go out and pick fresh herbs to throw into meals, and you might want to have some medicinal herbs on hand as well.

I've helped out with my parent's gardens, as well as a family member who has a full acre full of edibles around her home. I started my garden last year with lavender, rosemary, a lemon tree, and an apple tree. There was already a mature pecan tree on the property. The plan is to add squash, blackberries, garlic, and tomatoes next year. I'm taking it really slow though as I have a lot on my plate in other areas of my life right now, and I don't want to get overwhelmed.
 

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Tomatoes and peppers are pretty easy and fulfilling for a first time gardener. I would also go ahead and get some fruit/nut trees planted as you won't have to do much for the first year. Maybe some blackberries and/or raspberries, as they're nummy and good to make jelly with. I really want some spaghetti squash next year cause I like it, and they are big and filling. Look into planting some herbs as I find it great to go out and pick fresh herbs to throw into meals, and you might want to have some medicinal herbs on hand as well.
Good call on the fruit trees/bushes. The sooner you plant them, the sooner they mature. Just make sure you don't put them in places which will shade your crops.
 

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How's it with stains?
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I agree, grow what you like. Me and the wife just did our first one last spring. We grew what we knew we'd eat. Yellow squash, tomatoes, and bell peppers. Of course that fit us and our southern tastes; there's lots of options and you know what will get eaten in your home. Congrats on deciding to do it. It's one of the coolest things I've done in a while!! Hopefully we're going to start canning our stuff next year as well as try a fall garden.
 

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Start small. Look around and see what people grow in the area. Match that with what you like to eat. A garden is pretty much useless unless you're also prepared to cook and store what you produce. The winter is a good time to learn more about cooking and preserving. If like most people you're accustomed to buying whatever you want from the grocery store no matter what the season, learning to eat on a seasonal basis requires a transition. One month you'll have a ton of strawberries, the next tomatoes, the next squash, and so on. You need to learn to ride the peaks and valleys. You may also want to expand your palate so you learn to like a broad range of vegetables.

Good luck.
 

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60 yrs in spite of gov.
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I'm pretty new here but I do have several decades of garden experience. 2 acres is a space 200' x 400' plus. Unless you have a market for a lot of stuff I would suggest something more like 50' x 100'. For example, a 100' row of onions will be more than you ever need for the year. Same with potatos.
25 feet of salad mix will give you great salads all summer. 50' or 75' of pole bean will keep you busy. Some things like radishes are planted 2 and 3 times in short rows because they mature so fast.
Do a lot of research for what grows good in your area and use heirloom seeds so you can learn to save your own. You'll be better off.
I would suggest an earlier edition of Rodales Organic encyclopedia and Ruth Stout's no work book. These 2, in my opinion, are all anyone needs.
As someone else said, put in fruit trees now. ASAP. Good luck:)
 

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Old Toot
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Give your County Agent a call. They'll have lots of handouts on planning your garden and can recommend the varieties that grow best in your area.
2 acres sounds like a lot of garden if you're just starting out.
 

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Not trying to be a wise-ass... grow what you and your family will eat.

Get some homesteading garden books from the library. Make a garden plan on paper. Plan your work then work your plan.:thumb:
This would be my advice as well. We grow almost all our food and the whole
winter BEFORE starting (during planning stage) I kept a close watch on what
was in our cabinets and what we picked up at the market as far as fresh
things went. Made a list, started researching what could be grown in the
area and started ordering seeds and laying out beds. Most state Ag depart-
ments have PDF printouts for local gardeners you can download, some will
even send extension workers out to look around and give you advice for
free as well. I know here in Louisiana you can also take what's called
"Master Farmer" classes that give you a lot of insight into local gardening
and farming.

For us, being realistic, the majority of our garden is in tomatoes, potatoes,
greens, beans and corn. Staples of most dishes for us at least. Then we
plant around that things that are seasonal or things that don't preserve
well for summer meals.

Good luck!
 

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I've been reading some of these gardening posts and somehow POTATOES seems to be unfairly left out in most of it. Where i come from (europe) you can hardly find a home garden without at least one row op popatos planted. If you plant late kinds - the one that you pick in autum thay last until spring in a moist basement, and the early kind you can pick in june - these are realy delicious with thin skin and you do not have to even peel them, just scrape the skin with a knife. And i don't know anyone that do not like potatos or french frise.
 

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I've been reading some of these gardening posts and somehow POTATOES seems to be unfairly left out in most of it. Where i come from (europe) you can hardly find a home garden without at least one row op popatos planted. If you plant late kinds - the one that you pick in autum thay last until spring in a moist basement, and the early kind you can pick in june - these are realy delicious with thin skin and you do not have to even peel them, just scrape the skin with a knife. And i don't know anyone that do not like potatos or french frise.
That's funny, I was just posting about potatoes in a different thread. I agree; no garden should be without a potato bed.
 

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Farmer/Film maker
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As stated above, go with what you eat, but two whole acres is pretty huge for a family garden.

When you are planting, be sure you know how much fruit you can get from one plant. Beans, tomatoes, strawberries, potatoes, and peas tend to have a lot of fruit in a year. A couple of rows of beans can keep a couple of people very busy for half an hour for weeks. Potatoes tend to survive harvests and will be there to greet you in abundance in the spring.

Over production of crops is cool and everything, but it can become overwhelming if you plant too much.
 

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2 acres for a first time garden is probably a big no-no even with the tractor. I would maybe cut those plans down to 1/2 to 1 acre. I've had gardens for around 10 years. Biggest one was probably about a 1/4 acre and that was alot of work.
 
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