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Jackpine Savage
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Next time I make links I am going to add diced apple and bread crumbs to the pork for a apple flavored breakfast sausage.
Pineapple bratz ore my wife's favorite. I think my dad is the only person I know that doesn't like them, but he won't even try them. They are on the list of things to learn how to do this summer since nobody around here makes them and I no longer go to the town with the meat market where I used to buy them.
 

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The only pack mix I’ve ever tried that I liked is this Portuguese mix from Noh
Ingredients: Powder Vinegar, Salt, Sugar, Powdered Milk, Garlic, Onion, Chili Pepper, Paprika, Spices.

(Some commercial brands of Hawaiian-style Portuguese sausage include powdered milk in their ingredients list and some don't. Supposedly it's added to make the sausage retain moisture.)

This homemade recipe uses vinegar, garlic, red peppers, salt, black pepper, paprika, and liquid smoke:
Hawaiian Portuguese Sausage

Another Hawaiian recipe, outlining what likely makes up those mysterious "spices" in that packet:
Pica Portuguese-style Sausage

4 pounds well-marbled boneless pork butt with surface fat
15 cloves garlic, minced or pressed
12 small, hot Hawaiian chili peppers*, minced
4 to 6 tablespoons Portuguese spice (recipe follows)**
2 tablespoons coriander
1/2 cup paprika
2 tablespoons salt
1 tablespoon freshly ground black pepper
3/4 cup red wine vinegar

Cut pork into cubes. Grind coarsely; if you don’t have a grinder, mince the meat (a food processor may be used but tends to overprocess the meat, mashing instead of mincing it).

In large bowl, combine meat with remaining ingredients and mix well with heavy spoon. Heat a little vegetable oil in frying pan over medium-high heat. Form a small patty from pork mixture and fry until cooked through. Taste and correct spices. (You might have to do this a couple of times.)

Cover and refrigerate overnight to allow flavors to blend and mellow. Shape into patties and refrigerate up to one week or freeze, with squares of kitchen parchment between patties. Or fill pork casings, smoke and refrigerate up to one week or freeze to preserve.

Store Portuguese sausage, tightly covered, in cool, dry place or in freezer. Makes about eight 8- to 10-inch links.

* Hawaiian chili peppers (nioi) are capsicum frutescens, are similar to Thai chilis, and are VERY hot. They rate anywhere from 50,000-70,000 on the Scoville scale. Other small red chilis of similar Scoville rating may be substituted, such as Thai hot peppers or cayenne or tabasco peppers.

** Portuguese spice blends
» Portuguese spice recipe (big batch): 1 bottle stick cinnamon, 1 bottle whole cloves, 1 bottle whole peppercorns, handful fresh or dried bay leaves, handful whole star anise. Preheat oven to 300 degrees. Spread spices and bay leaves in rimmed baking sheet. Toast in oven until crisp and aromatic, about 20 minutes. Finely grind in spice grinder, blender or with a heavy, Thai-style stone mortar and pestle.

» Small-batch recipe: 4 sticks cinnamon, 2 tablespoons whole cloves, 2 tablespoons whole peppercorns, 4 bay leaves, 4 star anise. Toast and grind as above.

» "Cheater" Portuguese spice: 4 tablespoons ground cinnamon, 3 tablespoons ground cloves, 3 tablespoons ground black pepper, 1 tablespoon ground bay leaf, 1 tablespoon ground star anise. Toast and grind as above.

ETA: Thanks to 97guns for inspiring me to check this out. That last Hawaiian Pica Portuguese-Style recipe reads like a damfine hot sausage recipe with a lot of spicy subtleties to it rather than just a big blast of capsaicin. I'm going to have to give it a shot at some point. (y)
 

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Author, prepper, father
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I like to make venison and pork sausage. I do breakfast, kielbasa, andouille and summer sausage and do my own bacon. The picture is a converted canning shed I use for my smoke house when I do large batches of smoked sausage and bacon. If it is a small batch I have a propane and an electric smoker on the porch. I use 4 old propane smokers for my hot smoke cabinets and they vent to the upper room, which I use for cold smoking. They are feed from a oil drum smoke generator I had made. I can get all four hot smokers up to 220 degrees. Oh, try adding a little freshly ground ginger to your breakfast sausage, makes a nice zing...
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I purchased a 20lb Boston Butt (pork).... and I have 8 lbs of deer that my daughter gave me, from the buck my grand-daughter killed. The mix will be awesome.

I will be making breakfast sausage this coming week and stoked about it.


....
Make sure and add additional fat as that deer is going to lean out the mix quite a bit.
 

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I just found out that sage is the #1 ingredient in breakfast sausage so I bought a bottle and tried some, came out dang good, tastes just like jimmy dean or store bought breakfast sausage, didn’t use a recipe. Salt, pepper, garlic, Italian spices and Sage
Wouldn’t the meat be the number 1 ingredient???😂
 

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Nooooo , pork fat rules I would add at least8 lbs of pork belly to even out the venison
then the but should be ok by it self
 

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Hey, I'll buy a seasoning blend if I find a really good one for something I make often. Saves a little time in the kitchen putting together a long list of herbs/spices, and if they can do it as well or better than I can for no more money, why not?
 

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Mike’s Bacon Cure



Bacon cure usually contains salt or a salt substitute such as celery powder, sugar, curing salt and other seasonings. You can use a wet or dry cure, I prefer a dry cure. Bacon is usually the cured section of the hog known as the pork belly. Pork bellies average 13 pounds in weight.

Equipment:

Sharp large knife for cutting pork bellies

Skinning knife for removing pork belly rind

Large mixing bowl

Mixing spoon or large whisk

Meat slicer

Smoker

Refrigerator or cool room/root cellar

Vacuum sealer and bags

Ingredients:



13 pounds pork belly, usually I cut it into near 2 pound sections sized to fit in my slicer.

2.5 cups of kosher salt

1.25 cups of dark brown sugar

1 cup of course ground black pepper

1/2 cup of Insta cure number 1 or pink curing salt

1/2 cup of red pepper flakes

2.5 tablespoons of garlic powder

2.5 tablespoons of onion powder

Instructions:

1. In a large bowl mix all the dry ingredients using the mixing spoon or whisk, be sure they are completely mixed.

2. Cut the pork belly into manageable size chunks, I usually make them two pounds and about 8 inches wide since my slicer is a 9 inch slicer. Trim the chunks square, save the trim pieces.

Food Ingredient Cuisine Rectangle Dish


3. Coat the slabs of pork belly liberally with cure, place in one gallon resealable bags ( I found that the 2 pound slabs, sized for my slicer fit just perfect in a 1 gallon zip lock bag) add a tablespoon or two of additional cure to each side once the slabs are in the bags, seal the bags tightly.

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4. I use large cookie sheets to hold the slabs in their bags, while I place them in the refrigerator. Refrigerate for 7 days, turning the bags daily.

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5. At the end of 7 days, remove the slabs from the bags and rinse the excess cure off of each one.

6. Using the cookie sheets and adding racks, place the slabs into the refrigerator for one more day to allow them to dry. Some folks say you don’t need to do this, and some say you shouldn’t, I do and it turns out great.

8. Remove from refrigerator and smoke at between 160 to 200 degrees until the internal temperature reaches 160 degrees. I use apple wood smoke but you could also use hickory or mesquite, but watch out using mesquite as a little goes a long way.

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Food Tableware Wood Ingredient Rectangle


9. Remove the slabs from the smoker and place in the refrigerator until cold.

10. Either hand slice or use a slicer to slice the bacon to the desired thickness.

Kitchen appliance Cookware and bakeware Cooking Home appliance Cuisine

Food Animal product Ingredient Dish Fish


11. I use vacuum seal bags to keep the bacon fresh. I freeze what I don’t use right away and keep the I use bacon vacuum sealed between uses and refrigerated.

12. Due to the sugar content cooking at high temperature may result in black looking bacon, I suggest using 340 degrees or less cooking temperature.

Food Tableware Table Ingredient Recipe

Food Tableware Table Dishware Ingredient
 

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Mike’s Kielbasa (Polish) Sausage

Equipment:
Meat grinder
Sausage stuffer
Stainless steel bowels
Mixing spoons
Smoker
Sausage hanging rack
Vacuum sealer and bags
Ingredients:
14 feet of hog casings
4 pounds of boneless pork shoulder, beef or venison
1 pound of pork fat
2 cloves of garlic (minimum)
4 tablespoons salt
1 teaspoon black pepper
1 tablespoon Marjoram
1 1/3 tablespoons Insta Cure number 1
1 1/2 tablespoons sugar
1 cup ice water
Instructions:
1. Cube the meat and fat into 1 inch cubes and mix in a large mixing bowl.

2. Finely chop the garlic and mix with the meat.
3. Mix dry seasonings and mix into the meat.
4. Grind the meat through a medium die.

5. And the ice water and mix the ground meat to ensure the spices are transported throughout the meat mixture.
6. Use the sausage stuffer to stuff the sausage into the casings, each sausage should be about 2 foot long, tie them in a circle.

7. Hang the sausages in the fridge for 2-3 hours. Meanwhile warm the smoker to a minimum of 140 degrees and maximum of 160 degrees.
8. Smoke the sausage using hickory or apple wood until the internal temperature reaches 154 degrees, at the end of the process you may need to increase the smoker temperature to at most 195 degrees to achieve this.

9. Remove sausages and cool them in a water bath, then vacuum pack and freeze or refrigerate until use.
 

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Some brands make a “sage” specific pack of sausage. It’s usually my favorite. The safe adds a great flavor to breakfast sausage. Found a new flavor I enjoy as well … maple!!! Mmmmm
 

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Mike’s Bacon Cure



Bacon cure usually contains salt or a salt substitute such as celery powder, sugar, curing salt and other seasonings. You can use a wet or dry cure, I prefer a dry cure. Bacon is usually the cured section of the hog known as the pork belly. Pork bellies average 13 pounds in weight.

Equipment:

Sharp large knife for cutting pork bellies

Skinning knife for removing pork belly rind

Large mixing bowl

Mixing spoon or large whisk

Meat slicer

Smoker

Refrigerator or cool room/root cellar

Vacuum sealer and bags

Ingredients:



13 pounds pork belly, usually I cut it into near 2 pound sections sized to fit in my slicer.

2.5 cups of kosher salt

1.25 cups of dark brown sugar

1 cup of course ground black pepper

1/2 cup of Insta cure number 1 or pink curing salt

1/2 cup of red pepper flakes

2.5 tablespoons of garlic powder

2.5 tablespoons of onion powder

Instructions:

1. In a large bowl mix all the dry ingredients using the mixing spoon or whisk, be sure they are completely mixed.

2. Cut the pork belly into manageable size chunks, I usually make them two pounds and about 8 inches wide since my slicer is a 9 inch slicer. Trim the chunks square, save the trim pieces.

View attachment 410935

3. Coat the slabs of pork belly liberally with cure, place in one gallon resealable bags ( I found that the 2 pound slabs, sized for my slicer fit just perfect in a 1 gallon zip lock bag) add a tablespoon or two of additional cure to each side once the slabs are in the bags, seal the bags tightly.

View attachment 410943
View attachment 410940

4. I use large cookie sheets to hold the slabs in their bags, while I place them in the refrigerator. Refrigerate for 7 days, turning the bags daily.

View attachment 410939

5. At the end of 7 days, remove the slabs from the bags and rinse the excess cure off of each one.

6. Using the cookie sheets and adding racks, place the slabs into the refrigerator for one more day to allow them to dry. Some folks say you don’t need to do this, and some say you shouldn’t, I do and it turns out great.

8. Remove from refrigerator and smoke at between 160 to 200 degrees until the internal temperature reaches 160 degrees. I use apple wood smoke but you could also use hickory or mesquite, but watch out using mesquite as a little goes a long way.

View attachment 410937
View attachment 410938

9. Remove the slabs from the smoker and place in the refrigerator until cold.

10. Either hand slice or use a slicer to slice the bacon to the desired thickness.

View attachment 410936
View attachment 410944

11. I use vacuum seal bags to keep the bacon fresh. I freeze what I don’t use right away and keep the I use bacon vacuum sealed between uses and refrigerated.

12. Due to the sugar content cooking at high temperature may result in black looking bacon, I suggest using 340 degrees or less cooking temperature.

View attachment 410941
View attachment 410942
[/QUOTE
hi Mike , your bacon recipe is identical to mine .
But your pink curing salt is way out of wack , for 13lbs of meat I would use 11/2 teaspoons
of cure #1
I like to sprinkle it on the meat evenly and pack it on , then rub with the rest or the cure .
I cut my belly into 4 pieces that fit in a gallon freezer bag .
After I rub on my cure I like to fill the bottom of a Tupperware container full of meat
I mix it every day or 4 times in 7 days .
When cured the pan is filled up with liquid and the belly is just about floating .

Your sausage recipe should use more like a teaspoon of pink#1
The reason I mention this is I’ve seen some directions recently that state a TABLE spoon
of cure for 5 lb of meat ?
I’ve been smoking with pink cure #1 for a long time and it’s allways been a teaspoon for 5 lbs of meat .

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My grocery will grind beef free but won't grind pork, I think it's a cleaning thing. But they do have ground pork for the same price as bulk sausage, usually $2.98 but sometimes as low as $1.98.
Portuguese sausage, eggs, and rice makes a paniolo breakfast. Here a 13oz link was on sale for $5 so I think I'll try making some.
 

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Barrio Bajo Señor
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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
I go to a Chinese grocery store that sells 3 or 4 different grinds of pork, fine grind and coarse grind and both come lean and with more fat, more fat is cheaper
 

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Hmmm , pink cure is poison if you use to much .
I’m getting good cure with the teaspoon to 5lbs of meat fish call tree .
i think maybe you could use a table spoon but your half cup could be dangerous
I’d hate to see any one get sick from bad advice on the net respectfully john
 

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This for enough rub to apply it multiple times over the week if needed, I usually do one application and then just turn the pork bellies, so you are only getting a fraction of that on each slab.
 

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It’s still A LOT of pink stuff .
I’ve been using 2/3 cup of salt
1/2cup white sugar
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 teaspoon pink # 1 cure
For 5 to 8lbs of meat fish poultry
There is no talk about how much cure go’s in the meat there is no way to tell .
Those Ingredients go in your bag or your plastic container for 7 to 10 days .
Thin bacon 7 days thick bacon 10 days even pork but 3” thick 10 days .
But the amount of cure is always the same it all gets rubbed on the meat .
 
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