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I have about 150# of flour stored in vacuum sealed bags. Will it last 30 years? Who knows. I believe that if i have to live 30 years off of stored foods, things will be so bad that it wont matter what it taste like.
 

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Sounds like you are making good choices all around here. After you have your staples, get to the fancy dried foods and stuff. Taste testing is very smart. Good work all around. We keep a big COSTCO sized block of yeast in our regrig and a packets stored with our flour (which we keep bagged, wrapped and in a full garbage pail!). Very cheap to store like 2 years of flour and yeast. Put the flour in your freezer a few days before you put it in storage to reduce critters. Get some Ramen Pride boxes too for a few bucks. Then go to canned stews, chili, turkey, tuna and chicken. Add barbacue sauces and hot sauces for the canned meat and you are on your way to a year's supply. We keep 500 lbs of rice for 5 people. Cheap prep, easy to store for years.

You also chose oatmeal. Great. I store tons of it (COSTCO sells it by the twin bag) AND butter buds (dried butter) and cans of honey. Some things you need to get from cans, like honey to last. You can also stockpile brown sugar for oatmeal. Then practice eating the stuff! Oatmeal every day takes a bit of practice!

You are $500 away from a year's supply of food.
 

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I have purchased and tried the red feather brand canned butter and it was good. The Yoder canned bacon was also nice. I was not so entirely thrilled with the canned cheese it was very similar to processed cheese but it will come in handy when I cannot get anything else.
I didn't like the canned cheese just eating it right out of the can either, but when I melted it over a homemade pizza it was fine. I think it's better when combined with other ingredients.
 

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we looked at sauce but Aldis only had bottles - I want cans
tonight we bought 10 tubes of tooth paste (colgate) at the dollar store for $1 a piece
If you can't get those tall cans of Hunt's spaghetti sauce, you could buy cans of plain tomato sauce and canned tomatoes, plus some packets of spaghetti seasoning. I just mentioned it because you had so many noodles and it didn't look like there was anything to go on them.
Also, agree with the comment about not using milk jugs. I've also read that you can't really get milk or juice containers clean enough to store water. Stick with soda containers. And check your water jugs from time to time -- I've had them leak.
 

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If you can't get those tall cans of Hunt's spaghetti sauce, you could buy cans of plain tomato sauce and canned tomatoes, plus some packets of spaghetti seasoning. I just mentioned it because you had so many noodles and it didn't look like there was anything to go on them.
Also, agree with the comment about not using milk jugs. I've also read that you can't really get milk or juice containers clean enough to store water. Stick with soda containers. And check your water jugs from time to time -- I've had them leak.

I do something similar. Costco has #10 cans of tomato sauce and paste.(cheap, cheap) I'll take two cans of sauce and one paste, add spices, and just a little water, to can up a dozen quarts at a time. For something like 10$ I'll have 3 gallons of sauce in reasonably sized jars.
 

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I have not done much study on water, but what we have been doing is...as we use milk, we fill the jug with water and stick it away. not sure if water ever goes BAD.

also we have a creek within walking distance and I have been looking at purifiers - suggestions anybody
Used milk jugs are a bad choice for two reasons. First of all, there's no way to clean the milk residue out of the pores of the plastic. In time, this gives bacteria an environment to grow in. Secondly, the plastic that milk jugs (and 1 gallon jugs of water from the store) are made of breaks down and begins to leak. We've had a lot of complaints about that here.

The purifier is a great idea as it lets you use water sources you come across as well as your creek. Calcium hypochlorite (pool shock) is also something to consider. It's a better way to store chlorine than bleach which has a short shelf life. The pool shock has a long shelf life. It's always good to have some water storage also, in case you can't get to the creek for whatever reason, violence, weather, etc.

As for storage methods, there are many. After a LOT of detective work and more than a bit of luck, I've managed to put away about 1,600 gallons for $100. Using a combination of 275 gallon food grade IBC totes that I managed to find for $20 each and a 375 gallon livestock watering tank that I was given free for hauling it off.

The IBC totes are available all over, but generally cost more than the $20 I paid. And used water tanks are available on and off in farming areas. The IBC totes are stackable also, which means you can store 275 gallons of water in a 4x4 foot area in the garage or basement. I realize that not everyone has the room for a setup like this, but this site is full of a lot of other methods of storage also.
 

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I see some folks recommending flour. I store some of it too, but not a lot. Flour doesn't last all that well, even when stored in mylar with O2 absorbers. It's lifespan is going to be reduced even more when stored in vacuum bags or simply wrapped. I wouldn't store more than you're going to use in a couple years at most. Same with corn meal and most ground grains.

A lot of us have bit the bullet and bought a grinder so that we can store wheat berries and whole corn. Grinders don't have to be expensive. They can also be used for grinding beans so that they cook faster, requiring less fuel. Or old beans that won't soften by simmering. Grinding popcorn is a great way to make some of the best tasting cornmeal and grits that you've ever tried. And of course the whole wheat can be turned into everything from breads to fresh pasta. Whole wheat can be used as a hot cereal without grinding and it can also be sprouted. But it's nice to be able to make more things with it.

Barley is another great grain to store. It can be used as a hot cereal, a pilaf, added to soups, stews and beans, etc.
 

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I just ordered some canned butter, bacon, cheese... just to try... I do not want to stock stuff that tastes like crap
Believe me, if you are hungry enough everything tastes good, even that freeze-dried crap you get from Costco!
 

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The only thing we currently stock in huge bulk is Rice. We'll be getting grain as well for grinding, but other than that, we'll be making packs of dried "just add water" meals so we can rotate our stock much easier. Makes creating buckets a little more difficult than just pouring in a huge amount of stuff, but 1 bucket can have lots of different types of meals - better all around IMO.

We'll be buying canned butter, cheese, eggs and milk as well, but probably not for another month or two.
 

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Congrats on a good start..this is a good thread as it answered alot of questions for me..such as the canned butter,bacon and cheese..I wondered about those..I haved stored anything myself..I dont trust myself..Im afraid I will screw something up so Ive just been buying canned good with long dates (up to 2014)..I want to get some5 gal pails of prepacked beans and rice through Emergency Essitials..but as I stand..Ive good a good supply of canned goods and keeping them rotated keeps the exp dates a couple to a few yrs down the road...Amazon has the 275 meals in a 5 gal pail ..I got two of those so far..havent opened them to try any..but they"supposedly" have a 10-20 yr life and for roughly 225.00 I dont have any major investment in them of they arent what they advertise.
 

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I want to get some5 gal pails of prepacked beans and rice through Emergency Essitials..but as I stand..Ive good a good supply of canned goods and keeping them rotated keeps the exp dates a couple to a few yrs down the road...Amazon has the 275 meals in a 5 gal pail ..I got two of those so far..havent opened them to try any..but they"supposedly" have a 10-20 yr life and for roughly 225.00 I dont have any major investment in them of they arent what they advertise.
I wouldn't pay the shipping for rice and beans. You can get them close to home and they're easy to store. I bought dehydrated stew vegetables, potatoes, and eggs from EE -- things it would be harder for me to acquire or make.
 
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