Survivalist Forum banner

1 - 20 of 33 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
4,095 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Well, The wife and I did our first food purchase towards stocking our pantry. About $700
Rice
Beans
spaghetti noodles
flour
sugar
powdered milk
canned fruit
peanut butter
oatmeal

and a few other things

I feel better knowing that we have enough for a few months at least, and while I know we need to stock more, getting started feels good
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,000 Posts
How you plan on storing the rice beans and other stuff? Did You buy Bulk? where? Thanks just started getting the food thing going here...
 

·
Actias Luna
Joined
·
4,228 Posts
Welcome to the forum and Good job! There is a wealth of information on the boards that will help you. Stocking food is a great start. If you are in a home that you plan on staying in I would suggest planting an orchard this spring. It will feed you for many years but it takes 3 or 4 to produce. It's one thing I really wish I had started on sooner.

Storing whole grains and purchasing a grain mill is another good thing to get into. As the price of food goes up you can begin making your own. I have grains, a garden, bees, an orchard, and chickens in a tractor. Once I get my goats in the spring I can provide these things for my family: flour, vegetables, sweetener, fruit, eggs, milk and meat. If a person can procure the things needed to produce much of their own food they can put the extra money into other prepping areas.

Have fun and come back often!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
4,095 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
We did not buy bulk, we went to Aldis and bought cases of rice, beans ect. Our plan is to get stuff into plastic containers with moisture absorbers.

Bulk did not make sense right now because we wanted to have a variety of items. we will end up buying in bulk soon.
 

·
Capability, not scenarios
Joined
·
11,855 Posts
If you do the eat what you store, store what you eat thing, you can actually avoid the need for most long-term storage.

If, however, you're storing against a rainy day or TSHTF, then you'll need to do more long-term approaches.

Flour isn't a long-term prep; you'll have to use it up. In the right conditions (no oxygen, cool storage, out of the light) you might get a few years out of it, but nothing like you can get out of rice, beans, wheat, even dried milk.

One of the best ways to do long-term storage is in mylar, with an inert-gas atmosphere. Sometimes people will use dry ice to purge oxygen from a bucket of food they're storing, a few have a way to nitrogen-flush, but most people use Oxygen Absorbers. Since the atmosphere is almost completely Oxygen and Nitrogen, in a sealed storage environment binding the oxygen to the absorber leaves an almost perfect Nitrogen atmosphere.

Many of my own preps are put away against a big SHTF scenario; some I am rotating. I have buckets of rice, wheat, beans, dried milk, popcorn; all are stored in mylar bags in 5-gallon buckets.

The mylar bag is about the only reasonably-priced method for getting a good hermetic seal; if you just use food-grade buckets w/o mylar, the seal may or may not be good over time, and if you use O2 absorbers, they will create a partial vacuum in the bucket as the 21 percent of the air which is oxygen is bound to the absorbers. That can cause the bucket to collapse a bit (or a lot, depending), so in my case I don't put on the lid until after the mylar bag has collapsed against the food.

You've made some great steps in preparedness, and now that should give you a bit of peace of mind as you consider your next step.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,601 Posts
Flour isn't a long-term prep; you'll have to use it up. In the right conditions (no oxygen, cool storage, out of the light) you might get a few years out of it, but nothing like you can get out of rice, beans, wheat, even dried milk.
That's not quite true. BYU did a study on this and concluded:
"Consumers disliked browning of flour, but the browning was not perceived after making the flour into bread. Free fatty acids were the best predictors of flour age. Acceptance data indicated that storing wheat flour in a reduced oxygen environment was a viable option for long-term storage. "


http://contentdm.lib.byu.edu/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/IR&CISOPTR=91&CISOBOX=1&REC=6

http://contentdm.lib.byu.edu/cgi-bin/showfile.exe?CISOROOT=/IR&CISOPTR=91&filename=92.pdf

The study found that, from the samples sent in, even the 11 year old flour was found to be acceptable for emergency consumption. That's much longer then what many had thought about it being bad after a year or two. The browning of it was the biggest complaint, but after cooking it that wasn't a problem.

That's not as good as the 30+ years for wheat but much better then had been assumed.
 

·
Capability, not scenarios
Joined
·
11,855 Posts
That's not quite true. BYU did a study on this and concluded:
"Consumers disliked browning of flour, but the browning was not perceived after making the flour into bread. Free fatty acids were the best predictors of flour age. Acceptance data indicated that storing wheat flour in a reduced oxygen environment was a viable option for long-term storage. "


http://contentdm.lib.byu.edu/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/IR&CISOPTR=91&CISOBOX=1&REC=6

http://contentdm.lib.byu.edu/cgi-bin/showfile.exe?CISOROOT=/IR&CISOPTR=91&filename=92.pdf

The study found that, from the samples sent in, even the 11 year old flour was found to be acceptable for emergency consumption. That's much longer then what many had thought about it being bad after a year or two. The browning of it was the biggest complaint, but after cooking it that wasn't a problem.

That's not as good as the 30+ years for wheat but much better then had been assumed.
Could you survive on it, after storing it for 11 years? Perhaps. Would you want to? That's a different question to me. This source, as an example, also indicates it can be used long-term, but to me the key is not whether it can be consumed, but whether you'll want to:

http://ift.confex.com/ift/2004/techprogram/paper_25988.htm

That said, I have 50 pounds of white GP flour put up, in buckets w/ mylar and O2 absorbers. I'd expect to get 5 years at least out of it, and maybe I'd push 10 years.

But right now, flour costs me $1.19 per 5# at Aldi, so I consider it to be an excellent prep stored that way. If I want to replace it, until the price starts to rise, it's cheap to do so. But it isn't in the same league as my wheat berries, whose wholesomeness *and* taste should be similar in 30 years to what it is today.

Much of this depends on what one is planning for. Especially for those who don't have a ton of money to put into mylar, and buckets, and 50-pound bags of wheat, flour isn't a terrible way to go. And it does have the added advantage of already being milled. :)
 

·
Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
Joined
·
67,148 Posts
Sounds like you're off to a great start! It's always a satisfying feeling getting your first supplies laid in. I remember my first big steps fondly. Hang in there, keep prepping and keep working on your plans. It gets easier as you go along. One thing I suggest is to get to work on your water. That really should be the first thing worked on since it's more important even than food, and it's real easy to keep putting off.
 

·
Fire/EMS
Joined
·
766 Posts
Well you smashed all of my preps in your first purchsase. Good job. I wish i had 700 dollars to put into preps :(

Keep it up!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
we have spent about 700 the last 2 months for food preps and im amazed at how much we have. Its a great feeling knowing you can live on your own for a long time if you have too.. now as soon as i get a house I can start my garden.. i cant wait.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,789 Posts
Looks good. If I might suggest, a few jars of spaghetti sauce to go with your noodles. Also, don't forget toiletries and hygiene items. Lots of great lists on this site.
 

·
In memory of Rokitdog
Joined
·
14,951 Posts
I have gone the more expensive way with, freeze- dried, MRE's, and canned goods! I know I have to rotate but I prefer to have the variety and convenience. Plus I'm lazy, lol!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
4,095 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Sounds like you're off to a great start! It's always a satisfying feeling getting your first supplies laid in. I remember my first big steps fondly. Hang in there, keep prepping and keep working on your plans. It gets easier as you go along. One thing I suggest is to get to work on your water. That really should be the first thing worked on since it's more important even than food, and it's real easy to keep putting off.
I have not done much study on water, but what we have been doing is...as we use milk, we fill the jug with water and stick it away. not sure if water ever goes BAD.

also we have a creek within walking distance and I have been looking at purifiers - suggestions anybody
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
4,095 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Looks good. If I might suggest, a few jars of spaghetti sauce to go with your noodles. Also, don't forget toiletries and hygiene items. Lots of great lists on this site.
we looked at sauce but Aldis only had bottles - I want cans
tonight we bought 10 tubes of tooth paste (colgate) at the dollar store for $1 a piece
 

·
Looks like rain to me.
Joined
·
41,428 Posts
I have not done much study on water, but what we have been doing is...as we use milk, we fill the jug with water and stick it away. not sure if water ever goes BAD.

also we have a creek within walking distance and I have been looking at purifiers - suggestions anybody
Be careful with the milk jugs. They are designed to break down in the landfills and can deteriorate pretty quickly. My suggestion is either 2 liter soda bottles or 1 gallon "Arizona Iced Tea" containers.

Congrats on getting started. That's a big hurdle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,241 Posts
I do not know if you have a Winco around but I buy canned spaghetti sauce from their for @98 cents each.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,241 Posts
I have purchased and tried the red feather brand canned butter and it was good. The Yoder canned bacon was also nice. I was not so entirely thrilled with the canned cheese it was very similar to processed cheese but it will come in handy when I cannot get anything else.
 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
Top