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One should keep the first aid kit separately in a bug out bag or get home bag. The first aid kit must be quickly accessible, for example in the top compartment of a backpack.

That first aid kit must be clearly and waterproof marked, with a red cross on a white field.

In a first aid kit you can put everything that may be needed for first aid. But do not put other medical equipment in it, such as non-emergency medicine, chapstick and anti-itch cream. Otherwise you will not be able to find the urgent first aid items quickly.

A first aid kit includes: bandana, duct tape, cord, straps, garbage bags, headlamp, needles, sling, mylar blankets, DEET, tweezers, tissues, soap, water purification tablets, etc.

You can use a sling and bandana as an emergency bandage for a bleeding.

You can also store the most urgent items separately within your first aid kit, preferably in a transparent plastic bag with a red cross on a white field. This concerns: first aid gloves, emergency bandages and scissors or multi-tool.

Now and then you should train with your first aid kits under time pressure. Count the seconds that you need, to take out the necessary items.
 

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Abraham,

Where is your flag from ?

In my areas, I would strongly recommend AGAINST using a Red Cross on a white field. There are other symbols that I'd use such as a caduses or just large lettering in 2 languages. Some people take offense at the Red Cross. Are you familiar with the Red Crescent Society ?

If chapstick not OK to place in first aid kit, why have bandana in kit ?

Unless one's budget is ultra austere, I'd recommend to ditch the duct tape and replace with the best quality medical / surgical tape. Why is DEET in kit but not anti-itch cream ?

Your kit has no magnifying mirror nor a magnifying glass ?

I really need to know where you're from. Have you ever worn gloves as PPE or just cold weather related ?

Definitely have available all weather paper notebook to immediately start records management such as start of direct pressure on extreme blood gush, use of one's own RX pharma consumption, ......
 

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One should keep the first aid kit separately in a bug out bag or get home bag. The first aid kit must be quickly accessible, for example in the top compartment of a backpack.

That first aid kit must be clearly and waterproof marked, with a red cross on a white field.

In a first aid kit you can put everything that may be needed for first aid. But do not put other medical equipment in it, such as non-emergency medicine, chapstick and anti-itch cream. Otherwise you will not be able to find the urgent first aid items quickly.

A first aid kit includes: bandana, duct tape, cord, straps, garbage bags, headlamp, needles, sling, mylar blankets, DEET, tweezers, tissues, soap, water purification tablets, etc.

You can use a sling and bandana as an emergency bandage for a bleeding.

You can also store the most urgent items separately within your first aid kit, preferably in a transparent plastic bag with a red cross on a white field. This concerns: first aid gloves, emergency bandages and scissors or multi-tool.

Now and then you should train with your first aid kits under time pressure. Count the seconds that you need, to take out the necessary items.
I keep my first aid in a pouch on the outside of my pack. It’s probably almost too big to go inside. I have another, much smaller pouch on the waist belt, that only has a tourniquet and bleeding stuff in it.
 

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3 sticks of butter and a can of Cheez-Whiz
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Are we talking IFAK or just a general boo boo first aid kit? If you're talking about an IFAK your packing list is incorrect. A general first aid bag, you can cram whatever you want in there but typically it's better to put stuff in it that was actually designed for that purpose. Bandanas are not sterile and should only be used in a last ditch effort to aid in stopping the bleeding. If we're talking about a post-SHTF scenario I'd imagine the hospitals won't be handing out a ton of antibiotics and infections are still lethal.

Your IFAK is for immediate life threatening injuries and your general first aid kit should have all the stuff you listed in it. There is absolutely no reason to substitute quality medical equipment that do a singular job for subpar equipment to try to fill some vague multiple use requirement. Belts are not a good substitute for tourniquets just as a credit card and scotch tape aren't a good substitute for a chest seal. Carry the right stuff, your life depends on it.

IFAK contents:

Tourniquet, x2 (Yeah you might need more than one, and even more than one on a single limb)
Sterile gauze pads, as many as you can fit
Sterile gauze rolls, as many as you can fit
Chest seals x2 (Each pack should have 2 individual seals for one entry, one exit wound)
Triangle bandages (Various uses, sling is one)
Nasopharyngeal Airway
Lube for said NPA
Medical gloves, light blue (So you can actually see the blood, hard to see with black gloves)
Decompression needle (Most people won't know how to use it, and a lot of people recommend not putting one in so you don't have some rando pretending to be a doctor kill you with it)
SAM Splint

Anything else needs to go in another bag as it's not immediately needed but still can be useful. You should also put extras of everything in your IFAK in your extra medical supplies bag/pouch as there's no guarantee the above will stop the bleeding or you might find yourself in a situation with multiple injured parties with life threatening injuries. Some of the above stuff you listed belongs in a toiletry bag and not a first aid kit anyways.
 

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Definitely have available all weather paper notebook to immediately start records management such as start of direct pressure on extreme blood gush, use of one's own RX pharma consumption, ......
Sharpie on the forehead for time TQ has been applied works well and if they need a TQ applied to them they probably won't notice you writing on their forehead or think much of it.
 

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The last one I just bought off Amoron is blue with a white + First Aide Only. 299 pieces. Haven't gone threw it yet to add things - its for the box on the back of the 4 Wheeler. If I like it I'll get another one for the truck.

Have rite in rain book with the pen.

Today got the Grabber Space blanket with hood for the box. Green/silver.
 

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For me I have 1st aid kits(IFAK) and a boo-boo kit. and I have supplemental items in my bag. On my kit I have, strictly medical/ 1st aid items(im sure ill leave some things out)

for gloves I used NAR bear claw they are tan not black.

IFAK under front plate with red shock cord hanging out:
-2x combat gauze
-NPA/lube
-decomp needle
-alcohol pads
-iodine pads
-ace bandage/safety pins
-eye shield
-gloves
-vented chest seals
-compressed gauze
-4" trauma dressing
-xstat12
-frog tape(flat medical tape)
-large flat gaze
-paraffin gauze
-mini sharpie
-pillpack(Tylenol/avalox/meloxicam)
-casualty care card
(TQ, strap cutter and shears on front of PC)

micro trauma kit back center of belt:
-chest seals
-decomp needle
-combat gauze
-compressed gauze
-gloves
-NPA/lube
-frog tape(flat medical tape)
-eye shield
-alcohol pads
-sharpie
-casualty care card
(TQ on front of belt with sharpie)

boo-boo kit on belt:
-bandaids(various sizes and shapes)
-Neosporin
-burn jel
-chapstick
-tweezers
-electrolyte pack
-emergen-c pack
-mole skin
-cleansing wipes
-alcohol pads
-meds(motrin/Tylenol/Imodium/pepto/Benadryl)
-chlorohexidine in (little bottle for rinsing wounds)
-sting/bite wipes.

supplimentals(in backpack):
-samsplints
-triangle bandage
-instant cold packs

vehicle kit:
-gloves
-strap cutter
-chest seals
-compressed gauze
-flat gauze
-flat sponges
-decomp needle
-roll of surgical tape
-SAM splint
-duck tape
-4" and 6" trauma dressings
-TQ 2x
-triangle bandage
-91% alcohol
-betadine
-shears
-eye shield
-survival blankets x2

Man that got long didn't realize there was so much.
 

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I subscribe to 1/2/3 line gear concept and have multiple redundancies. In the vehicle I keep other things to survive outside of medical things (food water etc.)

Apologies again didn't realize how long that was just was going down the list.

Feel free to suggest things I may not have or forgot to list.
 

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For me I have 1st aid kits(IFAK) and a boo-boo kit. and I have supplemental items in my bag. On my kit I have, strictly medical/ 1st aid items(im sure ill leave some things out)

for gloves I used NAR bear claw they are tan not black.

IFAK under front plate with red shock cord hanging out:
-2x combat gauze
-NPA/lube
-decomp needle
-alcohol pads
-iodine pads
-ace bandage/safety pins
-eye shield
-gloves
-vented chest seals
-compressed gauze
-4" trauma dressing
-xstat12
-frog tape(flat medical tape)
-large flat gaze
-paraffin gauze
-mini sharpie
-pillpack(Tylenol/avalox/meloxicam)
-casualty care card
(TQ, strap cutter and shears on front of PC)

micro trauma kit back center of belt:
-chest seals
-decomp needle
-combat gauze
-compressed gauze
-gloves
-NPA/lube
-frog tape(flat medical tape)
-eye shield
-alcohol pads
-sharpie
-casualty care card
(TQ on front of belt with sharpie)

boo-boo kit on belt:
-bandaids(various sizes and shapes)
-Neosporin
-burn jel
-chapstick
-tweezers
-electrolyte pack
-emergen-c pack
-mole skin
-cleansing wipes
-alcohol pads
-meds(motrin/Tylenol/Imodium/pepto/Benadryl)
-chlorohexidine in (little bottle for rinsing wounds)
-sting/bite wipes.

supplimentals(in backpack):
-samsplints
-triangle bandage
-instant cold packs

vehicle kit:
-gloves
-strap cutter
-chest seals
-compressed gauze
-flat gauze
-flat sponges
-decomp needle
-roll of surgical tape
-SAM splint
-duck tape
-4" and 6" trauma dressings
-TQ 2x
-triangle bandage
-91% alcohol
-betadine
-shears
-eye shield
-survival blankets x2

Man that got long didn't realize there was so much.
273,

Can you amplify on " casualty card".

I do volunteer emergency field work with dentists and am not familiar.

Thanks in advance.
 

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Ah ha, US military.

Our focus is primarily head trauma / actual dental and whether patient in shape for field treatment.

I've got the big color coded evac tags and all the other attached stuff like a cross referenced evac wrist band and one tag for personal records re "hospital" (could be makeshift clinic) name/location.

For our personal homestead group near different arrangements. We have 1 retired dentist and me, having about 2 years worth of dental courses to help. Our dental trailer had to be relocated from this county due a new ordnance prohibiting permanent wheeled containers. Three of our people will return it here as soon as needed.

Again, appreciate learning about the US military card.
 

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NP good to have I think, but I also think when SHTF and hospitals shut down it will be kind of pointless. Gonna be hard to survive serious trauma if there is not medical/surgical facilities. That hasn't happend yet so currently they can be very useful
 

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NP good to have I think, but I also think when SHTF and hospitals shut down it will be kind of pointless. Gonna be hard to survive serious trauma if there is not medical/surgical facilities. That hasn't happend yet so currently they can be very useful
273,

Our medical / dental facilities can be available, but anarrow and specific SHTF event is hurricane closure of roads. The "Just call 911" crowd thinks the political subdivisions like counties have numerous all weather, all terrain rescue vehicles. ...... and the few don't even have value until the hurricane's displaced trees are removed from the roads.
 

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One should keep the first aid kit separately in a bug out bag or get home bag. The first aid kit must be quickly accessible, for example in the top compartment of a backpack.

That first aid kit must be clearly and waterproof marked, with a red cross on a white field.

In a first aid kit you can put everything that may be needed for first aid. But do not put other medical equipment in it, such as non-emergency medicine, chapstick and anti-itch cream. Otherwise you will not be able to find the urgent first aid items quickly.

A first aid kit includes: bandana, duct tape, cord, straps, garbage bags, headlamp, needles, sling, mylar blankets, DEET, tweezers, tissues, soap, water purification tablets, etc.

You can use a sling and bandana as an emergency bandage for a bleeding.

You can also store the most urgent items separately within your first aid kit, preferably in a transparent plastic bag with a red cross on a white field. This concerns: first aid gloves, emergency bandages and scissors or multi-tool.

Now and then you should train with your first aid kits under time pressure. Count the seconds that you need, to take out the necessary items.
I agree with most of what you are saying.
however, everything can't be first to access in the BOB. In my view, self defense should be first (spare mags), followed by fire starting, and immediate protection (blanket or poncho). Then somewhere after that should be the first aid kit.
If I have to reach for that bag, and abandon my truck or my home, then bad stuff has already happened. Sure, I could be hurt, even bleeding. Common sense will tell me to stop the bleeding any way I can, perhaps with a piece of duct tape. Until I can get safely away from the current situation and to a secure spot where I can evaluate everything, including additional wounds.

But that is my view. I'm not a hero, I am not going around performing triage on those around me. I am getting myself and my people to a safe spot.
 
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I agree that there is equipment/supplies that should be readily accessible, and that an IFAK should...within reason...be one such item.

However, and this is given my years in both EMS and Nursing, the KSAs of recognizing and mitigating a medical emergency are much more important, because an intervention can usually be accomplished without the "proper" equipment/supplies.
 
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