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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A buddy of mine was a wilderness guide/rafting/outfitter for quite some time and put together a list of equipment he carries on his outing with largish groups for the 1 to 3 day trips he guides. I basically want to build the same kind of thing for my family, but perhaps with a look toward longer durations. He tells me it is alot cheaper to just make the list and buy the gear locally for those things that are attainable locally, so I have been looking that way, but is there an easier way? Also, I really don't have any medical experience at all, so some of the devices in the larger and more sophisticated kits would be a loss or waste on me. What reading materials would help a newbie (and a person who will remain a newbie for this) have a chance of administering the proper treatment with these devices. Sure, I know how to use a tourniquet, administer pills, deal with shock, bleeding that kind of thing. I don't know how most deep tissue injections are administered (which site if any), other than the standard allergy types (epipen and previous incarnations). I definitely don't know how to intibate someone (and probably dont know how to spell it correctly), so I am not even thinking of going there. Something with diagrams would help...

Here is the list:

Bandage Materials
2 Eye Pad, Sterile
8 Dressing, Gauze, Sterile, 4" x 4", Pkg./2
8 Dressing, Gauze, Sterile, 2" x 2", Pkg./2
4 Dressing, Non-Adherent, Sterile, 3" x 4"
4 Bandage, Conforming Gauze, Sterile, 3"
20 Bandage, Adhesive, Fabric, 1" x 3"
10 Bandage, Adhesive, Fabric, Knuckle

Bleeding
6 Gloves, Nitrile (Pair), Hand Wipe
1 Trauma Pad, 8" x 10"
1 Trauma Pad, 5" x 9"

Blister / Burn
4 GlacierGel (Large Oval)
44 Moleskin, Pre-Cut & Shaped
6 Aloe Vera Gel with Lidocaine, 1 oz

CPR
1 CPR Face Shield, Laerdal

Dental
1 T emporary Cavity Fill ing Mixture

Duct Tape
1 Duct T ape, 2" x 5 Yards

Fracture / Sprain
1 Bandage, Elastic with Velcro, 3"
1 Bandage, Elastic with Velcro, 2"
1 SAM® Splint, 4" x 36”
2 Bandage, Triangular

Instrument
1 Splinter Picker/Tick Remover Forceps
1 Thermometer, Digital
1 EMT Shears, 4"
3 Safety Pins
1 Pencil

Medical Information
1 Comp. Guide to Wilderness & Travel Medicine
3 Patient Assessment Form

Medication
10 Aspirin (325 mg), Pkg./2
20 Ibuprofen (200 mg), Pkg./2
20 Acetaminophen (500 mg), Pkg./2
10 Diamode (Loperamide HCI 2 mg), Pkg./1
20 Antihistamine (Diphenhydramine 25 mg)
1 Glutose Paste (Glucose 15 g)
6 Oral Rehydration Salts
2 Antacid, Pkg./12
14 Cold Medicine, Medicidin-D, Pkg./2
6 Cortisone Cream 1%, 1/32 oz (.9 g)
1 Nasal Decongestant Spray, 1/2 fl oz
6 After Bite Wipe

Other
1 Water Disinfection T ablets (Bottle/50)
3 Plastic Vial, Flip-top, Large
4 Plastic Vial, Flip-top, Small

Survival Tools
1 Matches, Waterproof / Disposable Lighter
1 Emergency Reflective Blanket, 60" x 96"

Suture / Syringe
1 Scalpel, Sterile, Disposable, #11 Blade

Wound Care
12 After Cuts & Scrapes Anethestic/Antiseptic Wipe
3 Tincture of Benzoin T opical Adhesive
1 Scrub Brush, Sterile
2 T ape, 1" x 10 Yards
1 Syringe, Irrigation, 20 cc, 18 Gauge Tip
3 Povidone Iodine, 3/4 oz
2 Cotton Tip Applicator, Pkg./2
2 Wound Closure Strips, 1/4" x 4", Pkg./10
10 Triple Antibiotic Ointment, 1/32 oz
2 Dressing, Burn, WaterJel, 4" x 4"
1 Blood Pressure Cuff
1 Stethoscope
5 Diotame (Bismuth Subsalicylate), Pkg./2
1 Eye Wash, 2/3 oz, (20 ml)
1 Sunscreen, SPF 30, 1 oz
1 Zinc Oxide, 1 oz
4 Splinter out®
1 5” Hemostat Clamp
2 Instant Ice Pak
2 Instant Heat Pak
2 SAM® Splint, Finger
1 Hand Sanitizer / Alcohol 3 oz.


Anything I should change/add? I am planning for a family of 4...myself and 3 kids. Is there too much stuff in this thing? Im figuring this would be the "I have a working vehicle kit", and can get to some help within 12 hours or so. I need something else for "I must lug it personally through not so nice terrain" kit.
 

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I have taken a 3 day wilderness first aid class and we just touched on the basic of wilderness first aid. If your buddy is a guide he would have been required to take a First Responder class and then has to take a refresher wilderness first aid class every 3 years. The First Responder class is 10 days long and takes you thru a lot of detail with dealing with extreme situations in a wilderness scenerio. If you have the time you should take at least a wilderness first aid class and cpr, but highly recommend a first responder course if you have the time and money.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Dusty. Honestly though, I don't know if I will be able to do it soon since I'm a single parent with two jobs. Ten days off is unheard of. I can rarely get 3 days from both jobs that are coterminus. I will talk to my friend and see if he knows a good local firm and maybe they can do it after hours...just have to work out the kid logistics.

Even with the training though, I still want some reference materials, since it may be quite some time before I have to use the training I get in practice.

The "Comprehensive Guide to Wilderness & Travel Medicine" book he recommends isn't bad. I was also considering getting "Wilderness Medicine, Beyond First Aid, 5th Edition (Paperback)" as well. I guess it wouldn't hurt to have a dental reference book as well.
 

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http://www.nols.edu/wmi/courses/
i just have two books from NOLS that I keep with my first aid supplies.
I am a hands on type of guy, so i like learning by having others show me. I would like to take the first responder class, but with my work I dont have the time right now.
Best of luck.
 

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First and most importantly, you have earned my respect for being one of the few people to actually form a kit that is relatively comprehensive and THEN ask for help. To many people put some band-aids in a box with a bottle of hydrogen peroxide and then go on the forums asking for help. It's nice to see someone has the brains to think BEFORE they post. Now, my rant aside, I'm here to help ya out with my know-how. Here are my suggestions:

  • Add more nitrile gloves. 6 pairs is a very good start but if it is four of you, that may require more gloves. Also, try and obtain some sterile gloves such as Triflex. If you are unsure where to purchase them, you can go here or ask your doctor next time your there.
  • Add more gauze. The pads you have a great and keep those, but also look into getting some rolled gauze. It is great for post-clot wrapping of wounds. Also, along with gauze rolls, get something called “coban.” In most places like CVS it will be called “self-adhering” tape because Coban is a brand name. This stuff is amazing and it actually works. I use it all the time to wrap wounds. And don't worry about it's strength, it sticks to itself very well. (On an added note, do not wrap coban directly on a wound, the woven cloth isn't the best thing to rub against a wound. Put gauze on the wound THEN wrap it in coban.)
  • More duct tape. Although not the most pretty thing, it can be used for about everything so I would just go ahead and stick a roll in there.
  • Throw in a pen, because it's no fun when that pencil tip breaks or you run out of lead. On that note, I see you have a pencil but no notepad. Throw in a small notepad and take DETAILED notes of what you do to a patient that can be given to EMS. (Hopefully you wont screw up and make a big mistake but if you do, notes may explain why to the EMS why the person is going into cardiac arrest. Not likely but it's a simple something that may save a life.)
  • Put in some non-aspirin because, although rare-ish, some people are allergic to aspirin.
  • Here is an amazing book that covers all you will need to know. I know it is for combat but don't worry about that, it's still an amazing book.
  • Increase your amount of povidone iodine. It works as well as alcohol but without out the pain. (To the patient and to you after the patient punches you in the jaw from the pain of the alcohol. And although it's painful, don't discount alcohol, it's still good just a more painful method.)
  • Lots more steri-strips. You have them listed as “wound closure” strips but look for 3M's steri-strips. They are one of the best things known to man and are more effective than the “wound closure strips.” Although I try and write with humor, steri-strips are really a necessity. Unless you have the ability and stomach to suture, steri-strips are your best alternative.
  • As an option, upgrade your EMT shears to the 7 inch ones, but that is only a recommendation.
  • You didn't list which CPR mask you have (If it was one of the “membrane” ones or if it was a full mask) but if it is one of the plastic sheets (The “membrane” kind) then quickly replace it with a full shield like this one. They are much safer and much more effective along with giving the EMS the ability to hook an ambu bag directly to the patient.
  • A blood sugar meter is a must. Contrary to popular belief, they are not just for diabetics they can be needed by anyone. It's always a good idea to have on handy to check blood sugar. Quite often, someone is feeling dizzy and tired because a low blood sugar, and if you have one of the meters, you can check to see if that is there problem.
  • Take that blood pressure cuff to your next doctors appointment and ask the nurse/doctor how to use it because knowing HOW to use things are more important than having the items. The nurse would probably give you a quick run through on how it works.
  • You said that your needle has an 18 gauge tip. So I assume that it has a needle tip on the end if it has a gauge. If it does have a needle, try and get another syringe that has no needle as well.
  • I also suggest a good multi-tool in your kit such as a Gerber or Leatherman.
  • I would suggest you throw in a few cough drops as well.
  • A disposable razor.
  • Some larger gauze sponges, you have only 2x2 and 4x4, check into some larger 8x8 and 12x12.
  • But a whistle in there to signal that EMS guy looking for you.
  • If you wish, you can put some ammonia inhalants in there.
  • Put a snake bite kit in there.
There are many more trauma related items that I would be happy to list for you if you wish. I'll check back in to this forum in a few days to see if there is anything else you wanted to know about. And please, I beg you, don't be afraid to ask questions. Questions left unanswered may be the difference between someones life and death. I also want to apologize now for the lack of intelligence put into this post . . It's late at night . . If you are curious about anything else, either reply in post or send me a message. Also, here is a link to my first aid encyclopedia that is a much better written article on first aid.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you very much Eagle9944!

I don't see any fallacy in the stuff you have suggested. I will be going through the motions to procure the stuff you mentioned, and see how I can fit it into my kit. I made sure to segment off all the items into separate packaging within the overall first aid pack so that I can find stuff more easily under duress. Unfortunately, in some cases, these pouches are really full, and I may need to add another pouch to the pack, or maybe move things around a bit.

As far as a whistle and a knife/multitool, and other emergency supplies, thats in the full kit, just not in the first aid component. I need to think about this and decide whether I should double up on these things, just because I may be sharing the first aid kit with people who have not prepared at all. The gerber shortcut with scissors (I dont know why so many people like the plier models better) is small and light enough that I could put it in there without really taking a hit.
 

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having a good sharpie is nice because one of the things i learned in wildereness first aid is if you are having to take vitals on a wounded person, you need to be able to write that stuff down on something. your ABC's, etc., a sharpie can practically write on anything you have around you.

another thing i am starting to do with my first aid kit it i am breaking up the stuff i have and vacuum sealing it into smaller wound kits. this way i dont have to worry about the stuff getting wet and each is packed and ready to go. that is something else to think about.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Maybe I'll get one of the space pens...the worry I have about sharpies is that they dry out and leak sometimes. Maybe the newer ones are better...the retractable type. I guess it doesnt hurt to put it in there in its own zip-top.
Yep. I have already done those two things. I really want it to be easy to find things. I am guessing that when something bad happens, I'm going to be really under duress, since I'm no medic. I did part all the pieces out by the labels I had above, and I do have the whole thing is a waterproof storage bag.
I also have some nice bivvy blankets, but they are really too large for the first aid kit. Maybe I will put one in there just in case.

Right now I'm trying to procure the items that eagle9914 suggested. I did end up putting a pair of 8.5" shears in there. Still looking for the sponges and some of the other items. Later this week I'll take the list to walgreens and see what I can come up with. If that doesn't work I'll call my doctor and ask his nurse where I can get the less common items.

Wonder how hard it is going to be to get Betadine. I really want to put some in the kit. I haven't even started looking for that yet. Small bottles, or even better, individual wipes might not be that common. Maybe I'll throw a light/glow stick in there too that I can tie to someone so I can find them more easily if I have to leave for a short period.
 

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+1 on the Sharpie, I have some in my FAK, though mine are for writing on the patient. No, I'm not kidding. Certain things like the pedal dorsalis (spot where a pulse can be measured on the foot) are in slightly different spots on different people. By using a Sharpie to mark them, it can make it easier to take vital signs in the future or aid other caregivers to take vitals.

As far as the recommendation to include a BGL (blood glucose level) monitor... I have mixed thoughts on that. While it can be very useful in diagnosing some conditions, and is dead simple to use, the test strips are expensive and expire rapidly. There is a little variation between meters and the different test strips, but AFAIK the strips, unopened, usually expire within 18 months. Once a container of strips has been opened/exposed to air, they usually expire within 6 months. Also storage in hot or cold conditions can cause the strips to become defective.

Here is a question for the OP. Are you intending on using the contents to treat just yourself and your family, or are you also thinking you might be providing first aid to others? If you're really just trying to provide for the needs of your family, then something like the BGL might not be needed, unless a family member is diabetic. If on the other hand you think it likely that you might end up treating people you don't really know and therefore don't know their medical history, it can be useful.

As far as training, I would consider that very important to get. In understand give your situation that taking something like an advanced course like Wilderness First Responder, or an EMT course isn't currently an option, but how about a first aid/cpr course by the Red Cross? It's been awhile since I took one of those, but IIRC they're usually done in something like one or two days. Something to consider anyway.

-Cheers
 

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Few suggestions on items, after some training of course..

GI or Israeli bandages, they are very useful.
Quick clot, the powder and bandages both work well.
Asherman Chest seal, or as least vaseline bandages for open chest wounds.
Tracheal tube for mouth and nose, not sure if it was mentioned.
Suture kits, to sew up wounds if you cant make it to a hospital.
IV kit and bag of saline solution, certainly stay away until you know how to tap a vein.
I would pack 2 hemostats.
Small face masks.
Garbage bags.
A good headlamp and glow sticks.

Yes a sharpie is good to have, for instance if you apply a tourniquet you should mark their forehead with a T. It might sound strange but I would write on their face, any medication or treatment given to a serious casualty. All of the things Ive mentioned can hurt people seriously if its not done properly, I highly suggest some type of training before giving any serious aid.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Todjeager:
My intent is to treat myself and my immediate family. Sure I might take it somewhere with a group, but thats not the intent. None of us are diabetic yet.
M.J.:
I am with you on the sutures. I have garbage bags, headlamps and glow sticks in my primary bag...but they are small so some redundancy isn't probably an issue. As far as the advanced medical devices like IVs, Traecheal tubes and such, I will wait until I know how to use them. They are on my "list", but I won't be getting them until I absolutely know.
 

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Todjeager:
My intent is to treat myself and my immediate family. Sure I might take it somewhere with a group, but thats not the intent. None of us are diabetic yet.
M.J.:
I am with you on the sutures. I have garbage bags, headlamps and glow sticks in my primary bag...but they are small so some redundancy isn't probably an issue. As far as the advanced medical devices like IVs, Traecheal tubes and such, I will wait until I know how to use them. They are on my "list", but I won't be getting them until I absolutely know.

Sounds like a good idea, redundancy is good for sure if its small or has many uses. Garbage bags have so many I could not list them all, but they are very nice to have for many first aid situations. Mostly they are handy for keeping things clean and dry, or to clean up a mess rather than leave a trail.

For example if its winter or raining and someone breaks an ankle and cant get their boot back on you can wrap it loose with a bag, or worst case type thing you can toss a severed limb in there with one of your cold packs and if they are lucky get it reattached. Its done with fingers and toes often, and my rule is never leave a limb you can find behind. Sorry if that is a bit gruesome but its reality.
 

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I also have to mention suturing a wound takes some training, not the sewing part really but the cleaning and caring of a wound that needs stitches. It would have to be a total SHTF situation otherwise you would certainly just get to a hospital. The risk of infection is so great, especially without antibiotics and probably not a very sterile environment, it would just be a huge risk. I would always just try to use steri-strips or tape and keep a very close eye on it. But I could see situations where you might need to sew something up.
 

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I will be adding a ferw more things in a more user friendly list later. I would now but my internet is down and I'm stuck using a BlackBerry... Not good for long posts. As I said, I will post a more detailed and user friendly list as soon as my new web gets hooked up. And as for the blood sugar monitora, don't buy one yet... I can show you many sites that will send you one free of charge. So, until my web is fixed, just consult this list and I will add on ASAP. I will be in touch soon enough.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I have added alot of the "missing items" to my kit using Eagle9914 and MJ's recommendations. It easily fits in my medic bag. Some details:

What I excluded:

I didn't include any equipment I had no hope of using/learning. Because of this, I didn't include the saline and intubation stuff. Hell, I can't spell it, let alone use it. Maybe after training I will add it in. I do have quite a few saline filled syringes I can throw in that I used to use to flush my gf's IV/mediport when she was getting chemo. Now that shes gone, well, should I add them in? Couldn't hurt right?
I couldn't find any Israli/USGI bandages. I am suspecting that these might be covered with just rolled gauze and sponge bandages right?
I don't know what kind of snake bite kit to get. I know we have rattlers everywhere here, but I may not be using it just locally. Any recommendations?
I threw in some non-aspirin pain reliever (and there was already some in there), but is this the only reason that I should put non-aspirin in the kit? Is there some secondary aspirin effect I need to substitute for (anti-clot?).
I have seen so much discussion about what quick-clot agents are best, and to be honest, I don't even know where to go from here. No single agent seems to be problem free. What is the best quick clot agent I should put in the kit for general bleeding trauma from cuts and lacerations? Where can I get it?
I can sew, but I didn't include sutures. Maybe I should add some just as a safety measure. Any ideas?
I need to add super glue.
Should I add in an ampule of "Skin Shield" or similar in the kit? I can tell you, getting skin shield in your cut hurts like a son of a bitch. I need to re-read its application instructions.
Is there a reasonable and decent re-usable blood sugar meter/monitoring kit? I don't have one.

Thanks guys.
 

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The saline syringes are great for cleaning/debriding a wound, it is a good add to your kit. I am so sorry to hear about your GF and her illness, if you ever need someone to talk to please feel free to PM me.

The GI/Israeli bandages just have multiple uses and hold up better than most bandages or gauze. You can google Israeli bandage to find some, they can also be found at surplus stores or in many surplus medical kits. Here is some info on them...
http://www.olive-drab.com/od_medical_tech_trauma_bandage.php

I would not use a snake bite kit unless it was a last resort, current medical procedure is to not use a snake bite kit at all, its old news and they have hurt many people. Do not cut a snake bite, do not suck out the venom or squeeze it, do not put chemicals on it, do not apply a tourniquet, do not administer any drugs. If you have no chance to reach a medical facility or anti venom a Sawyer extractor would be the only method I would use, along with a pressure dressing NOT a tourniquet. This is a Sawyer kit.
http://www.rei.com/product/407144

Most Quik-clot generally works the same way, they make bandages for abrasions and topical use and they make powder for areas bandages cannot reach. They are used when other methods will not stop bleeding. When all else fails or a tourniquet cant be applied then use the quik-clot, it can cause mild burns but that is better than bleeding to death.
http://www.z-medica.com/

Aspirin should not be given to children, someone snake bitten, anyone prone to bleeding internal or external, pregnant females, anyone with liver or kidney disease, and many other conditions. When in doubt you should not give someone Aspirin.

I see no problem with Skin Shield and people use it, but I really dont know how effective it is. In all honesty I would avoid suturing a wound unless it was so large or bad that I had to sew it back in place, like fatty tissue or muscles literally hanging out. Even in that situation I would not close it completely because the risk of infection is very high. If possible I would wrap and or tape the area in place until the wound could be debrided properly in a sterile environment, then maybe sew up the wound if it needs to be.

You can find a good blood glucose monitor at most pharmacies such as Walgreens, CVS, or Rite-aid. I am sure you could find a good deal online, but I have no clue about which ones are good or bad.
 

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You can find a good blood glucose monitor at most pharmacies such as Walgreens, CVS, or Rite-aid. I am sure you could find a good deal online, but I have no clue about which ones are good or bad.
A good monitor/meter is the Ascensia Contour series, which is available and reusable, the price should be ~$30. The test strips, which are not reusable, typically come in boxes of 50 or 100 for about $0.50 per strip. The monitor itself normally comes with 10 test strips.

-Cheers
 

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More First Aid Info

I am back now that DirectTV decided to show some customer service and send me my modem for Internet service. Before I begin, I am sorry about your girlfriend man, you shall be in my prayers hence forth.

+100,000 for the maturity to not stuff things in a bag that you don't know how to use. To many people make the mistake of filling a pack full of things they have no idea how to use. Know HOW to use the things you have is way more important than HAVING the stuff. Many things can also be improvised and a detailed knowledge of how to use things and how they work can allow you to rig up something you may not have. So please continue your education and only pack the items you know how to use and that will save more lives than the guy with a big bag of things he has no idea how to use. And to close this subject, don't ever think you can learn it when you get there. Don't pack things and hope than you can just “figure it out” when something happens.

As for the Emergency Trauma Bandage/Dressing (Or ETD, Izzy, or Israeli combat dressing/bandage) they can be bought here (4", 6", and 8") for an amazing price. They may seem expensive but they combine many different things into one bandage. And trust me on that price, I can't find them cheaper even on eBay.
is an amazing video on using the ETD put out by the maker of the dressing. Here is a picture diagram if you feel the urge to print it out. Rolled gauze is good but it would take many different items to equal what one ETD offers.

+1 On the advice on the Sawyer extractor. I put a snake bite kit in my bag because my bag is not only for general use but also for a post-apocalyptic world. But I very much suggest the Sawyer extractor, you can try here for a better price because you can combine the shipping with your ETD's. Remember, if you try and use the extractor, it must be used within 3-5 minutes. After that it is not effective at removing the venom. If you choose to purchase one, please read the instructions in detail and comet them to memory.

I agree with M.J., most clotting agents work in a smiler manner and therefor most any will do. The agents don't cauterize the blood but force clotting using natural elements. It's similar to pouring salt on the wound except (In QuikClot's case) it uses kaolin to clot the blood. Here is a detailed list of FAQ about the product and here is a full PDF on QuikClot. Celox is a similar item but I am unsure of how it works because I don't personally use it. (That does NOT mean there is a problem with it, it just means I don't use it. If you wish to use it, by all means investigate than purchase some.) If you are interested in buying some QuikClot, here is a site for it. Here is the same thing for Celox.

+1 To M.J. On his description of aspirin. His description is highly accurate and I see no fault in what he said. His description explains the need for non-aspirin pain reliever. I also suggest may OTC (Over the counter) medications. Here is a great list of many different medications and there uses. Add however many you need for your uses. If you know that someone in your party has more allergy reactions, more Benedryl, or if someone has migraines, more Advil and etc, etc.

THE ABILITY TO SEW MEANS NOTHING WHEN IT COMES TO SUTURING WOUNDS. Suturing a wound is completely different from sewing a throw pillow. Unless you decide to get training from either a First Responder course (Or other first aid course) or from a DETAILED reading from a medical reference or medical textbook, do not use sutures. But do not be sad, there is a great alternative to suturing. So please, do not worry about suturing a wound unless you go through training to do so. Trying to sew someone up like they are a dress is going to make things much worse.

The amazing alternative to sutures is steri-strips. Steri-strips are strips of UBER sticky tape. They are more than that but that is a quick and simple definition. I highly recommend the 3M brand of steri-strips. They are by far the most effective at closing wounds. If you can not find any of 3M's steri-strips look at your local pharmacy for “wound-closing” strips. Those are a generic knock-off that are O.K. But might not be as effective. Another simpler alternative to suturing/steri-strips are butterfly closures. Those can be purchased at almost any CVS or Walgreens. They are not as effective but they are still good at closing wounds. If you are on a stressed budget, you can make your own butterfly closures and here is a video to do just that.

+1 On super glue. It ain't pretty, it ain't super safe, and it sure ain't painless but it is sure as hell effective.

Here is a blood glucose monitor that OneTouch will send you for free. I do warn you, you must either be diabetic or know someone who is or they won't send you one. My mother is a diabetic so I was able to obtain one from them and it is a very good meter that I leave with my mother. I use another one in my kit. If you don't know someone diabetic, I'm sorry but you will have to go to a store and shell out some money for a monitor. Generally, there are no “bad-monitors” since all you need is a relatively accurate blood sugar estimate. One, or even ten numbers wont matter, all you need is a decent estimate to know if the persons blood sugar is the problem. It would have to be over a hundred off to not explain why the person is is passing out or they seem pale and unresponsive.

Here is some literature on medicine that you may wish to purchase. Ditch Medicine, Combat Medic Field Reference, US Army Special Forces Medical Handbook, Tactical Medicine, U.S. Army First Aid Manual for Soldiers ,
.

A tourniquet is not as horrible as it has been made out to be. I want you to read this article before you discount the tourniquet. If you decide to purchase one, DO NOT, I repeat, DO NOT think a stick and a t-shirt will do. Pleas purchase either the CAT, SOF, or MAT tourniquet. These tourniquets are the kind that can save lives more than the stick and t-shirt. I know they seem expensive but it will be a great investment when the bleeding has surpassed gauze and pressure. I have tried to provide the cheapest retail site for them but check eBay for the same ones. Ebay is a great site to buy items from but often the price can go so high that you might as well buy the item from a retail site.

Purchase a SAM splint. It covers any and all splinting needs you may have. I suggest the flat one because of it's ease to pack. Here is a great price on the SAM splint. Here is also some literature on how to use it.

Here is an interesting article that all civilian medics need to read.

I have mentioned this site many times throughout this post but I wanted to give you the home page site, BP Medical Supply. This place gets much of my money because of there low prices that even eBay can't seem to beat. If that site does not have what you are looking for, here are some others: Chinook Med, Rescue Essentials, Supply Captain, TacMedSolutions, Pacific Rescue, eBay, North American Rescue, Amazon (For most of the books), Tactical Response Gear, and Red Flare Emergency Supplies.

If you have any questions, just ask. I supply all this information to help not only you but all that read your posts and try to build up a good kit for all that want to take care of themselves and others. If you don't know, then find out by asking.
 

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Thanks Dusty. Honestly though, I don't know if I will be able to do it soon since I'm a single parent with two jobs. Ten days off is unheard of. I can rarely get 3 days from both jobs that are coterminus. I will talk to my friend and see if he knows a good local firm and maybe they can do it after hours...just have to work out the kid logistics.

Even with the training though, I still want some reference materials, since it may be quite some time before I have to use the training I get in practice.

The "Comprehensive Guide to Wilderness & Travel Medicine" book he recommends isn't bad. I was also considering getting "Wilderness Medicine, Beyond First Aid, 5th Edition (Paperback)" as well. I guess it wouldn't hurt to have a dental reference book as well.

i'm going to finish my first responder class next week, it was an 8 week class which sounds like a lot but it was only one day a week for like 3 hours or so a day. there's options out there for you i'm sure, i took mine through a community college that had flexible hours (nights and such) but you can take at least a cpr class through the red cross or something which should only be a few hours on a weekend.

the only thing i'd recommend adding is a few cervical collars (different sizes for different sized people) and maybe a backboard if you have the space for one. someone falls, vehicle crash or some other severe trauma that may cause cervival spine or neck injuries these would be good to have. but in a shtf scenerio with no aid centers, hospitals or anything these would ultimately be useless since there would be nowhere to transport anyone to.......but no one knows how things will go down so if you have the money and space to stick them i'ts a good idea.

and some pediatric cpr masks if your planning on giving aid to other's kids (i'm sure giving mouth to mouth to your own kids wouldn't bother you but you never know what kinda diseases other people's kids could have).

people knock the bandaids/adhesive strips for minor wounds but most times that's what you'll be going for. people always plan for gunshots and trauma and such but most of the time you'll have a bunch of small non-life threatening wounds to contend with, so if your stocking up i'd get at least a few hundred or so assorted sizes (depends how long your planning for being stocked and how many people your caring for).
 
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