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Rogue
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Discussion Starter #1
Another thread got me thinking about this. Is it possible to convert a gas fireplace to a wood fireplace using a fireplace insert?

I have two gas fireplaces I have never used. I could obviously outfit them with gas fireplace inserts. But wood would be better if its possible without replacing the existing fireplace and chimney, etc.
 

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Rogue
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Discussion Starter #3
Another question about inserts. Do they not require electricity to blow the air? If the electricity is out do they still function better than a standard fireplace or do they lose their benefit?
 

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sic transit gloria mundi
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It's possible but unlikely. The problem is how the gas fireplace is vented and if there is a real chimney. In addition, wood inserts are usually larger than a gas fireplace would allow. The best way to do this is to go to a fireplace store and have one of their techs come out and look at what you've got. In most cases, you're better of starting fresh and installing a wood burning stove. As you probably know, the gov is currently offering a pretty nice tax credit for biomass heating and either the insert or stove would likely qualify.
 

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sic transit gloria mundi
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Actually, most of the energy credit rated inserts do come with blowers but there are few where they are optional.
 

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Another question about inserts. Do they not require electricity to blow the air? If the electricity is out do they still function better than a standard fireplace or do they lose their benefit?
The do require electricity for the fan to blow. We have a rectangular-shaped, 2200sq foot house. The fireplace & insert is on one end of the house (living room). With the fan going, I can pretty much keep the whole house in the mid-to-upper 70s, except the back master bedroom.

When the power goes out, it's still WAY better than a standard fireplace. Rather than having your heat go straight up the chimney, the insert itself is a big hunk of metal that captures a lot of that heat and radiates it back into the room. You can easily get it so warm that you're wanting to raise the windows. The main issue is that you can't circulate that warm air without the fan.

The other nice advantage is that you can put a pot of soup on the insert's mantle and have a hot meal in about 45 min. It's not hot enough to boil water, but it gets nice & toasty. That's particularly convenient for us since out hot water heater is electric. Admittedly, you could probably cook over coals, but this doesn't mess up your pots. Just stick on the mantle and forget about it.
 

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I have the same question, but in reverse:

In my home, they converted a wood fireplace to gas.

It looks like they piped in a gas line through the brick and added the burners and valve, which are under some fake logs.

Could a guy remove the gas parts and gas line to restore it to wood burning, or am I missing some parts I am not seeing? (A converted flue, etc?)
 

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sic transit gloria mundi
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I would have it professionally done and then get a fire code inspection. If the flames or superheated air gets through the openings where the piping was, perhaps poof with the possibility of the insurance company not paying.
 

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Frozen Patriot
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Side note: they do make fans that are powered by the heat of the stove. Place the unit on top of the stove and as long as its hot the fan spins...



DS
 

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My Temperature is Right
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Another thread got me thinking about this. Is it possible to convert a gas fireplace to a wood fireplace using a fireplace insert?

I have two gas fireplaces I have never used. I could obviously outfit them with gas fireplace inserts. But wood would be better if its possible without replacing the existing fireplace and chimney, etc.
I can be done, you probably need to change the flue to double or triple wall flue though, you may already have double wall flue. If you just have a direct vent then you'll need to install a regular flue and extend it above the roof line as prescribed in you local building code.

I guess the the answer is yes but it's probably gonna cost you. In any case you need a gas certified plumber to come out and remove and plug the gas lines and get the wood conversion bought off by the zoning dept to keep your home owners insurance co happy. You may not be zoned for wood fireplaces also.
 
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