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SHTF Survivalist
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I searched around and didn't find anything about actual fire starting kits. I thought maybe it would be cool if we shared what kind of fire starting kits we have. Here is a video of a pouch I sewed together to hold my fire starting tools.http://youtu.be/mBw9SbgleEw
 

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reluctant sinner
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17,912 Posts
Cool. I'd add a cover to battery post to help prevent discharge. Wrap that balsa in wax paper and seal it in with an iron, keeps wood dry and provides high energy starter fuel wrapping. A few small birthaday candles would be nice addition. Yep Bic's are the best throwaway's I have found. Are those matches strikeanywhere water resistant? One other thing I would add is one of the fire steels. And my last thought is don't keep all your eggs in one basket. Viewer 11 in utube.
 

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Gotta have a minimum of 3 ways to start a fire. So at least have:

lighter, mini Bic's are great
magnesium or flint type fire stick/ spark maker
steel wool/ 9v battery or
magnifying glass/lens
char cloth
life boat matches or strike anywhere matches or weather resistant 'camp' matches
Germ-X
cotton ball soaked in vaseline
container that has your items in it that will keep it dry.
 

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SHTF Survivalist
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256 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Cool. I'd add a cover to battery post to help prevent discharge. Wrap that balsa in wax paper and seal it in with an iron, keeps wood dry and provides high energy starter fuel wrapping. A few small birthaday candles would be nice addition. Yep Bic's are the best throwaway's I have found. Are those matches strikeanywhere water resistant? One other thing I would add is one of the fire steels. And my last thought is don't keep all your eggs in one basket. Viewer 11 in utube.
Thanks for the advice man. They are regular strike on box matches. I am working on getting some strike anywhere matches and a fire steel.
 

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Bravo Zulu
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13,133 Posts
Here's mine. Jute twine, char cord, candle stub, tampons, Bic lighter, ferrocerium rod with striker. I really have to replace the char cord with char cloth, I'm not a huge fan of using jute twine to make char cord. Cotton sash cord works better.

 

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i have a firesteel with a mag rod on a paracord loop. i have jute on my pack and cottonballs+ vasoline in a dip can.

its never let me down, and i rarely use the timber i bring. im not seeing the need for so many or such large firestart kits.
 

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strikes to the left
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Here is a fire kit I assembled a few months ago. It is copied from a post at another forum:

I assembled my fire starter kit the other day and I figured I would show you guys.

Contents from left to right:
Innertube rubber (top) - Innertube rubber will burn forever once it's lit. It also burns when conditions are not so ideal.
Waterproof match box - The description is below.
Red butane lighter - This is perhaps the easiest way to start a fire. And the red color contrasts with surrounding territory, so it makes it easier to find if I drop it. I've also found that a lighter in the bush is invaluable for other tasks, such as fusing the paracord or sterilizing needles.
Small saw blade - This came with the magnesium bar. It works okay, but I'd rather use the knife. This is here just in case, though. It takes up very little space, so why not?
Magnesium bar - In my opinion, this is just about the perfect all-condition fire starter. I've used it to make fire in everywhere but underwater. And, the shavings work out perfect to ignite the innertube rubber, in case the lighter becomes ineffective to do so.
Jute twine - About 10 feet. When it's fluffed out, it will catch a spark quite easily, even from flicking the lighter without the flame. In dry conditions, I prefer to use this over other tinder, as it is easier to prepare.


This is the waterproof match box. With all of the available fire starters on the market today, matches have become inferior in nearly every way. But these little tubes are perfect for storage, and with the small piece of ferro on the bottom, it only makes sense to use it to store tinder. This particular box holds 16 (15 pictured) of my "tinder tubes", which are petroleum jelly cotton balls tucked into drinking straws.


The container that I keep the kit in is a metal container that had some kind of chocolate snacks in them. I purchased it at the dollar store for a buck, and the container is worth the price by itself. I cut it down so that the pieces of the kit will fit but have little extra space.


Here is a picture of the items placed inside the container.


I've come to learn that when you need magnesium shavings for a fire, they will go everywhere but the place you need them. Well, the lid to the container makes a perfect collection unit for the shavings.


And that's it. I feel that I am able to strike a fire with the kit under any conditions. Please feel free to make suggestions, as my bushcraft experiences are constantly evolving.
http://bushcraftusa.com/forum/showthread.php?p=711762#post711762

Since I've built this kit, I am in need to refill the tinder tube box. I've also replaced the chunk of saw blade with a small blade form a cheap pocket knife. I tested the knife to make sure it will scrape the magnesium, cut the innertube, cut the jute twine, and throw a spark from both the bottom of the tinder tube box and the ferro connected to the magnesium bar.
 

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reluctant sinner
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I like those cans and the cookies were ok too. I made a med kit for the truck with one. Those darn mice kept eating the bandaids; well they can't get to them now. That cut edge looks sharp, perhaps you could fold it over or a least tape it. Maybe a few bandaids.
 

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I don't have a "kit" really, but I do have the waterproof match box and it seems to work well. Also, something I learned on another survival forum was saving lint from your dryer's lint trap. Once you have about a plastic bag full, you can probably make more than enough. Keep back a few empty egg cartons (the paperish cardboard ones). I take a wad of lint and put melted candle wax over it. The candlewax will keep the lint dry until you need to use it. Simply break the "egg" of candlewax and lint open and viola! Dry clothes dryer lint to start a fire with. The egg cartons help form the shape, and they work well to store them in.
 
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