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I'll fix it
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I've been getting the new house ready for us to move in by taking care of the most fundamental preparations.
Fire prevention has been a long term concern of mine due to living in a condo and being at risk from other residents carelessness.
Now that I'll have a single family home, I'll have complete control of fire prevention and safety.
The new home (foreclosure) was originally built with an AC powered/battery backup system with 8 low budget detectors that I have replaced with 6 new photoelectric detectors and 2 new talking CO2/smoke detectors.
When one goes off they all go off and the system is linked to the security alarm.
I purchased several new large fire extinguishers and put one in every bedroom closets and the kitchen. I just need one more for the garage.
I want to be prepared for anything from an accidental or electrical fire to a molotov cocktail.
More suggestions on additional precautions or ideas are welcome.
 

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Believe in Yourself
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I've been getting the new house ready for us to move in by taking care of the most fundamental preparations.
Fire prevention has been a long term concern of mine for a due to living in a condo and being at risk from other residents carelessness.
Now that I'll have a single family home, I'll have complete control of fire prevention and safety.
The new home (foreclosure) was originally built with an AC powered/battery backup system with 8 low budget detectors that I have replaced with 6 new photoelectric detectors and 2 new talking CO2/smoke detectors.
When one goes off they all go off and the system is linked to the security alarm.
I purchased several new large fire extinguishers and put one in every bedroom closets and the kitchen. I just need one more for the garage.
I want to be prepared for anything from an accidental or electrical fire to a molotov cocktail.
More suggestions on additional precautions or ideas are welcome.
Sounds like you got it covered pretty well.
Do you have an in case of plan like where to meet and such? You might run a couple family drills.
Make sure everyone know to operate and what to do with a fire extinguisher.
My two cents...
 

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For many years we have had a fire blanket in the kitchen, next to the stove. A few weeks ago we had cause to use it when our neighbor set a pan of oil alight. Their smoke alarm went off and I went over to check on them. (2 small children in the home.) Went back, grabbed the blanket and threw it over the pan. Within seconds the flames were gone, smoke started to clear and no harm done except a new paint job for the ceiling.
Well worth the small cost involved!
 

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I'll fix it
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
For many years we have had a fire blanket in the kitchen, next to the stove. A few weeks ago we had cause to use it when our neighbor set a pan of oil alight. Their smoke alarm went off and I went over to check on them. (2 small children in the home.) Went back, grabbed the blanket and threw it over the pan. Within seconds the flames were gone, smoke started to clear and no harm done except a new paint job for the ceiling.
Well worth the small cost involved!
Fire blanket...hmmm. I'll have to check into that.
Thank You
 

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Looks like rain to me.
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Depending on the area you lve in, is it worth having the Fire Dept drop by for a quick inspection. I live in a wooded neighborhood and they come by before fire season and do a quick check. Looking for brush too close to the house, limbs that need trimming. Things I look right past.
 

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Sounds like you have thought this through. I might just make a few small suggestions.

1) You have prepared to fight the fire make sure you prepare to flee it as well. A means to get out of the house from a second story should the stairwell/hallway become unusable.

2) If you have kids some of those window stickers indicating to fire fighters which rooms your kids live in.

3) A plan on reaching your kids or a means for them to escape a second story if applicable.

4) A basic bag (call it BOB if you will) that you can grab on your way out if you need to do so quickly immediately after waking up. Include such things as pants, insurance info, spare keys to your car, etc. Also make sure your cell phone is always readily available.

5) Having a fire extinguisher near your laundry room is also a good idea.
 

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If your FD does home inspections thats a good move.

As far as going out second story windows go out feet first and hang, your feet will now be 5 feet so from ground.

As far as those stickers for windows showing where your kids sleep. forget them. No depts. even give them out anymore as far as i know. Ok when i moved in they were already on my windows,yet the folks there had no kids....and i took them off.

They don't mean much to us ( I got 20 years on the job ). We will search everyroom we will search where the fire allows us when it allows us. Sure if someone says , He's in such and such room we start there, although thats often wrong too....

I've been to over 20 fatals. Pulled a couple folks out alive . If you gotta wait for us to get to you, then your in a bad place and the odds are bad.

Sleep with doors closed. Most fires start in kitchen. Drunks and geekers cause many fires. Avoid open flames,candles start over 30 house fires in my city. Some of the best fires I've been to are ones folks tried to fight themselves first. Including one that killed 5 people that I went to brand new on the job !

Just some random thoughts .

Oh and after 15 years in the ghetto I can tell you ,you can't do anything for a molotov cocktail tossed in your home BUT GET OUT. Although many folks don't make them right to start with .
 

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I'll fix it
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
My new home is a single level, I do have an escape ladder here at the condo.
My kids are grown and live in other states and my GF kids are older too but, they're living with us.
I'll work up an escape plan. Every room has windows to get out and I'll rethink the extinguishers as escape aids or for minor fire suppression. I'll advise no candles. None of us are into getting drunk.
That's not good about the molotov cocktails because I figured if there happened to be riots I would have some protection.
We have GHB's in the cars but I need to reconfigure my BOB's from duffle bags to packs for each of us.
The laundry is in the garage, I'll take care of that.
Thanks for the advice. This gives me more of a realistic plan to follow...like get out.
I better get the fire resistant gun safe I've been looking at.
 

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Fire resistant paint, interior and exterior.

http://www.fireretardantsinc.com/bb400/BB_400_overcoat_coating.html

A sprinkler system on the roof. Can also double to wash fallout off.

Fire resistant landscaping.

http://www.sfrc.ufl.edu/extension/firehome.htm

Avoid wood shingles and wood siding. Aluminum and stucco exteriors are the most firesafe. Plastic will melt even if it doesn't get hot enough to burn. Keep all attic openings screened so embers from an exterior fire can't enter. Radiant heat is capable of starting a fire inside a house right through the windows. White or silver aluminum window blinds are the best for reflecting heat.

Lint is a great tinder material, especially in the vent from your dryer.

They make impact resistant laminated window glass to stop debris from hurricane winds from penetrating. I imagine it would also stop molotovs and thrown stones.
 

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I'll fix it
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Fire resistant paint, interior and exterior.

http://www.fireretardantsinc.com/bb400/BB_400_overcoat_coating.html

A sprinkler system on the roof. Can also double to wash fallout off.

Fire resistant landscaping.

http://www.sfrc.ufl.edu/extension/firehome.htm

Avoid wood shingles and wood siding. Aluminum and stucco exteriors are the most firesafe. Plastic will melt even if it doesn't get hot enough to burn. Keep all attic openings screened so embers from an exterior fire can't enter. Radiant heat is capable of starting a fire inside a house right through the windows. White or silver aluminum window blinds are the best for reflecting heat.

Lint is a great tinder material, especially in the vent from your dryer.

They make impact resistant laminated window glass to stop debris from hurricane winds from penetrating. I imagine it would also stop molotovs and thrown stones.

Fire resistant paint is a new one, interesting.
Tile roof, stucco, white blinds...check, got them.
The roof sprinklers, probably not.
The impact glass is a for sure deal. I already have it here in the condo along with hurricane screens. Great for security.
The landscaping is good to go.
Thanks for the tips.
 

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Well as far as fire gun safes.... I happened to have worked for a safe company for 9 years and my wife has over 25 years there.

Buy bigger then you think you'll need,kinda like tents. "Sleeps 4-6" means maybe 4 and its tight, same with guns.

I like a fire safe with a U.L. rating. Many or most won't have this. An independant label like U.L.s means something . Which is why many don't have it, they can't pass the requirements ! Its not just so long at a certin temp. either, some ratings have 'drop tests" also. Heat it for a certin time, drop it 20 feet onto rubble re-heat . Like if you fire dept. really sucks and your damn house burns to the ground and the safe falls into the basement.

Thats half joke , i know out in the wild fire areas, houses do burn to the ground on a normal basis . I'm used to urban stuff , where 90 % of the fires are 1-2 rooms, room and contents fires.

Oh check this out.http://www.homefirestation.us/

Now I know the guy who makes and sells these. I don't get anything from him etc. Others make units like this but his uses FOAM plus h2o which well makes it way better.
 

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I'll fix it
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Well as far as fire gun safes.... I happened to have worked for a safe company for 9 years and my wife has over 25 years there.

Buy bigger then you think you'll need,kinda like tents. "Sleeps 4-6" means maybe 4 and its tight, same with guns.

I like a fire safe with a U.L. rating. Many or most won't have this. An independant label like U.L.s means something . Which is why many don't have it, they can't pass the requirements ! Its not just so long at a certin temp. either, some ratings have 'drop tests" also. Heat it for a certin time, drop it 20 feet onto rubble re-heat . Like if you fire dept. really sucks and your damn house burns to the ground and the safe falls into the basement.

Thats half joke , i know out in the wild fire areas, houses do burn to the ground on a normal basis . I'm used to urban stuff , where 90 % of the fires are 1-2 rooms, room and contents fires.

Oh check this out.http://www.homefirestation.us/

Now I know the guy who makes and sells these. I don't get anything from him etc. Others make units like this but his uses FOAM plus h2o which well makes it way better.
Wow, I like the home fire station a lot. I will evaluate the plumbing & installation locations.
You can get it with a hose extension for up to 100'.
This will get some serious consideration.
What brand of safe should I look at in the $1000-1500 range?
Thank you for the post!
 

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Depending on your heating system, one that detects CO [carbon monoxide] can be a literal lifesaver. A backup/alternative for a fire extinguisher in the kitchen is a box of baking soda; something catches fire on the stove, baking soda's much easier to clean up and less toxic than a fire extinguisher.
 
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