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Still standing
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I'm far from being an expert on fire-fighting, so I'd like to ask those out there who are to give us some advise on fire extinguishers.

I've been caught outrageously undergunned when trying to fight a truck fire. I and some others stopped to help a fellow with an engine fire. I pulled this dinky fire extinguisher out my truck and opened up on this fire. The thing went pshhhhhhhttttt, then went dead. Didn't do ****. Fire went out 20 seconds ... maybe. Whhhhhoooooooosssshhhhhh!!! The fire came right back.

My water filter I keep in my gun safe on the top shelf -- a sacred place. I've got one decent (?) extinguisher and another puny one. I know I'm an idiot. How much of one, I'd like to find out.

Hey firefighters! What should we be packing in the way of fire extinguishers?!
 

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Camperius maximus
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Don't buy the rinkydinky ones, buy the larger size. One of the worst things on extinguishers as from what I recall from classes it that folks forget to "Roll them around" and get the powder loose.
Keep 1 smaller, and one larger both in the Kitchen. One of the bigger ones in the truck or car, and a really big one in the garrage, at least one in there. as well as a few smaller ones. And everywhere ther is alot of electrical and heat or flame. or Oily rags. But I haven't been a VFF ( Volunteer FireFighter) for quite some time.
 
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Maximus
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My water filter I keep in my gun safe on the top shelf -- a sacred place. I've got one decent (?) extinguisher and another puny one. I know I'm an idiot. How much of one, I'd like to find out.

Hey firefighters! What should we be packing in the way of fire extinguishers?!
This is a great and important topic. Fire is one of the most devastating hazards out there and so many are under-prepared for it.

For a fire, it really depends on the type of fire!!! Is it is a grease fire in the kitchen? Electrical fire? Chemical fire such as gasoline???

Each takes a different type of extinguisher. You can not use water on a grease fire for example. The water will spread the grease and the fire will spread. You cant use water on an electrical fire as it can transfer the current and kill you.

Get a good extinguisher rated for A/B/C and that will cover you for most common fires.

 

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Born to prep
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I think there needs to be a law were if you use your fire extinguisher to put out or contain a fire preventing further damage or loss of property then the insurance company covering said object or structure must reimburse you for the cost of refilling or replacing the fire extinguisher.

For an under the hood fire that has not reached the ground it is hard to beat a soaking wet wool blanket.

You also need to get one of those red fire extinguisher here signs with brail on it so if you have a fire you can send the blind guy to get the fire extinguisher.

There are dry chemical fire extinguishers that the user can refill. They have the powder and propellant separated into deferent reservoirs. After use you put new powder in the big can and replace the propellant tank. The propellant tank is sent back to the manufacture to be refilled. I have seen video of them being use and from what I saw they work very well.
 

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circuit rider
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According to OSHA:

No matter where people work, fire is always a potential danger. Common causes of fires include defective electrical equipment or wiring and smoking. Employees must be trained in fire prevention procedures as well as how to handle a fire emergency. Fire drills can ensure that people are adequately prepared in the event of an actual emergency. Employers should also hold annual training in the use of fire extinguishers.

Two acronyms are useful when it comes to handling fire emergencies. The first acronym to remember is for the use of fire extinguishers, PASS:

P – Pull the safety pin;
A – Aim nozzle of the extinguisher at the base of the fire;
S – Squeeze the handle to spray contents of fire extinguisher;
S – Sweep fire extinguisher side to side at base of fire.
The second is RACE:

R – Rescue persons in immediate danger, as long as there is no danger to a rescuer's life;
A – Alarm is activated, even if only smoke is present;
C – Confine the fire: close doors and windows;
E – Extinguish the fire.
If a fire is out of control, the priority shifts from extinguishing the fire to evacuation, so the “E” in RACE can also mean “evacuate.” Evacuation routes and fire exits should be clearly marked and reviewed during fire safety training. When evacuating the building, employees need to assist customers and any other non-employees in the building by remaining as calm as possible and providing clear instructions. Everyone should be instructed to leave in an orderly manner and move away from the building. Smoke may be very thick and make it difficult to see; people should crawl since smoke rises and visibility may be better closer to the floor. This may also reduce the chances of smoke and gas inhalation.

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Always keep your extinguishers fully charged. Find out who services your local hospitals & nursing homes.
 

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Jack of all trades
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Lots of good info here. In my experience (Volunteer Firefighter), firefighters don't get very much training on hand held extinguishers. We have them on the trucks but rarely grab them during a fire. I was fortunate enough to have my employer send me to a 3 day class at Ansul (huge extinguisher manufacturer) back in 98. Most fun class I've ever been to! If you ever have the opportunity, take this class! A few things to know/remember:

The big wheeled extinguishers will knock you on your butt if you aren't paying attention!

If you use a cartridge type extinguisher, aim the cap/lid away from your head/body before you charge the unit. You don't want to get hit by that cap if the threads fail.

Liquid fuel fires require extra caution when using an extinguisher. If you aren't paying enough attention, the liquid can run back behind you and reignite, leaving you surrounded by fire while holding an empty extinguisher.

Know your limits with an extinguisher and the limits of the extinguisher you are using.

If you come across an electrical fire, kill the power (if possible) before using the extinguisher. It won't do you much good to use up your extinguisher and the fire reignites as soon as it's empty.

When using a CO2 extinguisher with a cone/horn shaped nozzle, keep your hand back on the hose. Not only will you (possibly) get burned by the cold, sometimes they will shock the crap out of you from static electricity.

Also, FWIW... I keep an extinguisher next to my nightstand.
 

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I have a small kitchen one in the kitchen on the opposite wall from the stove.

I have a medium size one in a hall closet not 5 ft away from the entrance to both the kitchen and the living room (where I have a fireplace). That hall closet is in the hall the three upstairs bedrooms are off of.

I have one medium one on the wall at the foot of the stairs into my basement.

I have a small one on the wall in my bedroom and another small one on the wall of my stores room (where I keep my preps).

I have an extra large one just inside the door to my garage.

I also have a small kitchen one about 6 ft from my BBQ hanging on a post.


The main thing is to buy a rubber mallet and every 6 months or so turn the extinguisher upside down and "spank em" with the mallet for about 15 seconds to ensure the powder is not settled. give em a bit of a shake, and put em back in place.
 

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Retired and luvin it!
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Growing up in a family of firemen/cops I may have gone overboard but there are at least 10 f.e. around the house. one in each bathroom, 2 in the garage, 2 in the kitchen (pantry/under the sink), and a few more here and there and in the cars.

Didn't even think to thump them once in a while, thanks for the tip!
 

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When buying fire extinguishers get good ones stay away from the ones with the plastic valves on top,also buy one with a hose on for your vehicles. When putting out a vehicle fire disconect the battery or more than likely it will come right back. My favorite extinguisher a water can it holds 2.5 gal and you can refill it yourself they are great for outside fires and if you are burning trash or a ditch they can stop alot fire or can be used to wet the area before you start the fire.
 

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I have a small kitchen one in the kitchen on the opposite wall from the stove.

I have a medium size one in a hall closet not 5 ft away from the entrance to both the kitchen and the living room (where I have a fireplace). That hall closet is in the hall the three upstairs bedrooms are off of.

I have one medium one on the wall at the foot of the stairs into my basement.

I have a small one on the wall in my bedroom and another small one on the wall of my stores room (where I keep my preps).

I have an extra large one just inside the door to my garage.

I also have a small kitchen one about 6 ft from my BBQ hanging on a post.





The main thing is to buy a rubber mallet and every 6 months or so turn the extinguisher upside down and "spank em" with the mallet for about 15 seconds to ensure the powder is not settled. give em a bit of a shake, and put em back in place.

i used to work at a place where all the extinghishers were inspected yearly...guy did the mallet thing also......we had training occasionally....we had a safety policy....if one doesnt do it, head for the door......
 

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Fire can spread very fast and fumes are deadly... So remember some very basic when fighting with fires. (If you don't know them about yet, it is time to start reading something about fires!)

Fire extinguisher is for putting down small fires... So it is best to use fire extinguisher when fire is still small... We talk about first couple minutes when fire start... After that you probably need other equipment for putting down the fire (And still remember, fumes are toxic and can burn you seriously! (And gassmask don't filter fumes.))

Where i live... 6kg fire extinguisher is the first what they recommend you should have... All what are smaller, probably just are too small... Forexample 2kg fire extinguisher give you only about 8 sec time to put down fire...
6kg fire extinguisher give you about 15 sec of time to put down fire...
And 12kg fire extinguisher give about 20 sec...

Those seconds are really fast seconds when you try to put down fire... So learn how to use your fire extinguisher! Training is important...

I'm not firefighter, but i was filling fire extinguishers for a while and i'm very familiar with fire extinguishers... :D: I'm also used to using them to put down small fires...

Right now i live in small apartment. I have 2kg fire extinguisher in my kitchen to put down small fires when i'm cooking. :D: I also have fire blanket, i have in every room fire alarms and i have piece of hose for putting down larger fires... I don't own air tanks, but this is more than usually people have in their house... :D:

You should also know when you should give up and leave your house... Know what are differend states of burning... And be careful with those fumes! You don't need more than 1-2 inhale and they can take you down!

There is some sad stories when people crawl to their outdoor and then reach the handle... Head went 20cm up and that was enough... Couple inhale and they passed out... :(
 

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Yes you should buy the bigger ones and have a few. BUT FIRST call 911 and get everyone out, fight it with yourself between the door and fire.

I've been to hundreds of house fires, had a good 2 roomer last night as far as a 2 roomer goes. I've been to some great fires where the occupants tried to put it out before calling. Empty extinguisher, or a trash bucket or pan in the bath tub with the water still running... My first fatal, 4 people was like that, I'm not calling THAT a great fire though .

Me I have a good garden hose in the basement by the slop sink, I know it will reach to my second floor .
 

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We have close to 25 around the church and in church vehicles...they are all ABC. What I'm interested in knowing is what kind of extinguisher has a broader temperature range that they would function in.

Ours in the building do not have that broad of a temperature range, I'd like a better one for my big truck.
 

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Learning
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We have close to 25 around the church and in church vehicles...they are all ABC. What I'm interested in knowing is what kind of extinguisher has a broader temperature range that they would function in.

Ours in the building do not have that broad of a temperature range, I'd like a better one for my big truck.
Halon 1211 is -40 to 120F

ABC -65-120F

They seem to all be right in that area, surely there must be something that can operate safely at a higher temperature range?
 

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Yes, you should always as soon as possible call to emergency number! Do not wait too long before you do that! That is the real life safer what ever is the emergency...

For me that mean forexample if i'm cooking and fire spread i first take fire extinguisher or fire blanket and try to put down fire. If i fail in that (yeah i have that 6-8 second burst what to use) i call to emergency number right away before i do anything else...
Every minute is important and you should not wait too long... Like i said, fire can spread fast and fumes are the real killer...

Always if i later manage to put down fire before firefighters get here, i can call to the emergency number again and tell that to them...

One thing also came to my mind. Where i live they say only 1 people of 3 try to put down fire... 2 just call to the emergency number and don't even try to put down the fire...
Another fact is 2 fires of 3 is that kind what you could put down yourself...

So Skills to put fire down is pretty cool to have! :cool:
 

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I think there needs to be a law were if you use your fire extinguisher to put out or contain a fire preventing further damage or loss of property then the insurance company covering said object or structure must reimburse you for the cost of refilling or replacing the fire extinguisher.
Because the owner of said property sure as hell won't. I learned that lesson the hard way more than once. Now someone's car can burn to the ground for all I care. I'm not wasting another extinguisher, knowing the sack of crap won't even refill it for me.
 

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I'd want my car to be a totel loss as well, and most will be anyway. With all the computors and electronics its almost a given. One "fixed" would not be one I'd ever want.

BTW its the dry powder that ruins much of it... it can also damage aluminium
and magnesium,2 metals found in mnay engines.

23 years of fighting fires, I learned this I care for little I own. Not my Deer mounts,guns, my Dads and Grand Dads guns,family airlooms and I got clocks,watches,WWII dog tags,train sets in the box(pre war) old deeds family papers going back to the early 1,800's. butter churns and on and on.
NOTHING matters but my family. For me get out watch it burn,cash insurance check rebuild shoot some more deer.

I've seen 100's of fires and dozens of burned up people, meat falling off the bones....

Getting out is number one . I kind of understand those monks who own nothing,kind of freeing .
 

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I am not a firefighter but work in the oil industry and have been to numerous fire training schools. One important thing to add is that when you use an ABC or BC fire extinguisher do not breathe the extinguishing agent that has been heated in the fire. It forms an acid and will destroy your lungs and kill you if you breathe enough.
In a house fire if your extinguisher doesn't knock the fire down get out and be thankful for your life.
 
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