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Red White and Blue
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
http://www.community.fema.gov/connect.ti/readynpm/view?objectId=3239120

Fema presents 2015 Hurricane Preparedness Toolkit!

Just in time for Hurricane Preparedness Week, May 24-30

National Hurricane Center's preparedness page
http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/prepare/

"Get a plan. The most important step is to identify your hurricane risk. Do you live in an evacuation zone? If so, you need to plan on where you and your family would ride out the storm if you are told to evacuate. Most people only need to evacuate a few miles from the coast to avoid the dangers of storm surge. Find a friend or relative that lives outside the storm surge evacuation zone and have a plan to ride out the storm with them. You should also establish a family communications plan in case you are not together when you need to evacuate."

Lots of us might find it interesting to compare gummint hurricane preps/advice with our own.
 

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Bad Moon Rising
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I've been through 3 hurricanes, 2 in Florida and 1 on Guam.

One of the more amazing things I discovered was that the 3 items most in demand as people climbed out of the rubble afterwards - *in all 3 cases* - were bags of ice, bottled water, and disposable diapers.


Why none of these folks thought to go get these items before the storm remains a mystery. Hurricanes are many things, but sneaky isn't one of them. People tend to know plenty of time in advance to run out and get ice, bottled water, and diapers..... :confused:

Anyway, I'm convinced that if you just cover these 3 bases you're probably better off than most others!

Just MHO. YMMV.
 

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I've been through 3 hurricanes, 2 in Florida and 1 on Guam.

One of the more amazing things I discovered was that the 3 items most in demand as people climbed out of the rubble afterwards - *in all 3 cases* - were bags of ice, bottled water, and disposable diapers.


Why none of these folks thought to go get these items before the storm remains a mystery. Hurricanes are many things, but sneaky isn't one of them. People tend to know plenty of time in advance to run out and get ice, bottled water, and diapers..... :confused:


Just MHO. YMMV.
Yes Indeed. I have been through many. Some mild, some bad. In every instance, people seem not to have thought of water and diapers... People really are not that bright.
 

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KOAD; FOAD; ESAD
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My first hurricane of memory was Audrey...Betsy,Camille.Fredrick,Katrina....people who live down here go thru one,they shouldnt NEED fema to tell them to buy poptarts and diapers
 
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So bottled water, diapers and ice... bottled water, and disposable diapers can be stored and don't need power .. . My question would be just how long are they going to keep ice without power? So really I'm guessing they need a generator and fuel. While they may not go to fema site to read up on what they need most have experience and already know what they're going to need plus I would think the news ahead of time would be reminding people of what they need to have on hand?
 

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Deplorable and 3%
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So bottled water, diapers and ice... bottled water, and disposable diapers can be stored and don't need power .. . My question would be just how long are they going to keep ice without power? So really I'm guessing they need a generator and fuel. While they may not go to fema site to read up on what they need most have experience and already know what they're going to need plus I would think the news ahead of time would be reminding people of what they need to have on hand?
This is Florida and it is almost June 1st. Everybody who lives here should know that the season starts June 1st. Every year. Being ready should not be an issue, yet somehow it is. Many people are just stupid.
 

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So bottled water, diapers and ice... bottled water, and disposable diapers can be stored and don't need power .. . My question would be just how long are they going to keep ice without power? So really I'm guessing they need a generator and fuel. While they may not go to fema site to read up on what they need most have experience and already know what they're going to need plus I would think the news ahead of time would be reminding people of what they need to have on hand?
Yes, those of us with a brain in hurricane prone areas are well aware of what we need, and, I may add, we get the things we need at the beginning of the Atlantic hurricane season which is June 1st. The key is not waiting until its announced a hurricane is going to be hitting your area to get those things, unfortunately many still wait until the last minute. Its not like these items can't be used after an uneventful hurricane season has ended, drink the water, eat the food and use the fuel etc during the rest of the year, thats what we do and when June 1st rolls around again we buy the same items.
 

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Bad Moon Rising
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So bottled water, diapers and ice... bottled water, and disposable diapers can be stored and don't need power .. . My question would be just how long are they going to keep ice without power? So really I'm guessing they need a generator and fuel. While they may not go to fema site to read up on what they need most have experience and already know what they're going to need plus I would think the news ahead of time would be reminding people of what they need to have on hand?
The ice is to keep in coolers the items they have in their freezers after the power goes out. It can be out for up to 10 days, and if you have decent coolers that will allow you to stretch our the stuff in your freezers...

Even in the case of Hurricane Katrina, people knew 3 days in advance where it was going to make landfall. Lots of time to run out, fill up the gas tanks and pick up some ice...
 

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Red White and Blue
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
what, no milk / eggs / bread???

thx for input. Florida definitely knows 'canes.
 

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Bad Moon Rising
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I don't understand.
Doesn't your refrigerator make ice. And isn't it designed to retain tempretures better than an ice chest?

So knowing the probability of power going down why not dedicate more space in the freezer making large ice .and consume the food that might normally be lost.so that when the event occurs the. Ice can be put on the top shelf of the frig maintaining the food that is left.
After all the first refrigerators were ice. Boxes just that way.
It also provides you water as the ice melts.
Here are things to consider:

Yes, refrigerator freezers make ice, but no, they don't make ice without power.

Yes, they are designed to retain temperatures, but no, not necessarily better than the best ice chests.

We went down the Colorado River through the Grand Canyon on a 2 week long trip. A Yeti ice chest kept our frozen food frozen for 2 weeks. Your average consumer refrigerator freezer would not likely have done so, particularly not considering it was opened and closed several times each day.

If you can close your chest freezer and seal it with duct tape, and never open it, it may keep the frozen food frozen for as long, but not if you're opening it each day.

If you fill your freezers with frozen quart jugs of water, as many of us do, then you have less room for food. When the freezers get full, it becomes a trade off.

Moreover, as another poster said, there are also items such as milk, eggs, butter, mayonnaise, condiments and other items from your refrigerator that you want to put in an ice chest as well.

So filling up your ice chests with ice is a pretty smart idea if you know a hurricane is inbound, because you don't know how long you'll be without power, and a refrigerator without power is actually not as efficient at keeping things cool (while accessing them) as high-end ice chests can be (in my experience).

Your mileage may vary.

http://yeticoolers.com/
 

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Don't count on having cell service, btw. Ours was out 48 hrs after Irene. Tower's oower was out & backup battery dead.
 

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I'd look at the sites -- but I have a thing about looking at any government site now --- the next day I'll get an e-mail asking why I didn't sign up for obammy-dont-care --
 

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Crazy Cat Lady
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I found, after Ike, that a frozen 2 liter bottle of water, filled about 80% before freeze, to last the longest. Since I used potable water I also had nice cold water when they finally thawed, days later.

At the time my husband was living on strawberry protein shakes and would only drink them cold. The ice failed. The blue things failed. The 2 liters impressed the ****ens out of me. Day 3-4 they still had substantial amounts of ice and Ron still had chilly shakes.

This time around, it won't really matter as much. He likes fresh fruit so I will probably put that in the ice chest with frozen water bottles.

I could text out of area, but local cell was pretty dead. We were able to get a cab to work within a day or two, though. I have a power cell I will use to charge my cell. I'm pretty sure my husband has an extra battery for his old flip.

I always get a refill on my meds when something's nearby, so I don't have to worry about that.

I honestly worry more about flooding.

I do need to get a tarp, though.
 
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