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Totally off grid
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Feed/Deer corn is about $5 for 50#. It does need to be re cleaned, but other than that, i see no difference except pricing. Why not just buy this, re clean it, re bag it, and store it to grind into corn meal later? Corn is corn. As long as there are no other additives i see no reason to spend 5 times as much for whole kernels.
 

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It's $10/50lbs here. I have some and use it semi-regularly.

No, I don't bother to wash it. I throw it in stews and soups as is, and grind it up to add to my bread.

Nothing wrong with it. Nothing at all.



Edited to add....

I don't do anything special for storage, either. It's still in the sack I bought it in. Keep it dry. Almost as tough as pintos.
 

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off-grid organic farmer
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$8/bag here.

I buy it from a farmer one county West of us. I get it in the fall when they are harvesting and their warehouse is full [or getting full].

I have been getting 40 bags at a time. Same with barley and oats.
 

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Commercial corn is modified to have a higher suger starch then ordinary deer corn. So, it tasts sweeter. This is important in the American diet.

Have you noticed over the years (similar to nicotene content in cigaretts) that our food is getting sweeter? Have you noticed our our society gravitates towards sweeter foods?

The commercial food industry has retrained its customers to like this sweeter food, then to want more and then to NEED the sweeter foods in their diets.

Look at me without my coffee in the morning (taken black). I turn into Attila The Hunn. No joke.

Working in a grocery store, I have trained most of my customers to look for me and get their happy jolt for the day. Some of them come in every day now.

That is how easy the American consumer can be trained to perform in a certain way.

There is nothing wrong with buying whole animal feed and giving it an additional cleaning before your family consumes it. I would call it smart and using your money wisely.
 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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You mentioned whole kernels. Is the feed corn cracked? If so, then it's not going to have a good storage life. Part of what makes corn store so well is the hard, airtight shell that protects the oils from O2 exposure.

Kev made a post about his experience with deer corn. He wasn't impressed with it. Too much junk in it if I remember right.

Now if it's whole kernels and you don't mind cleaning it, there's nothing wrong with it. It's the same corn.
 

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Clean your corn if you are going to consume feed corn!
Feed corn can have all kinds of extras in there like rat/mice droppings, dust, dirt, pigeon feathers/droppings. Not to mention insects that like to live in the feed bags.

Most feed mills where they process and bag the corn are not sanitary environments! Just because you visually inspect the corn doesnt mean there arent mice droppings mixed in. Be safe!

Whole Feed corn would be best, you also see cracked corn (they smash the whole kernel and make a corn flake sized nugget).
Rolled corn is another option and would be closer to the consistency of corn meal with some larger peices thrown in.
 

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Patient Zero of WWZ
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Feed/Deer corn is about $5 for 50#. It does need to be re cleaned, but other than that, i see no difference except pricing. Why not just buy this, re clean it, re bag it, and store it to grind into corn meal later? Corn is corn. As long as there are no other additives i see no reason to spend 5 times as much for whole kernels.

Corn is corn.

Except for seed corn which is frequently treated with anti-fungals and such.

For our purposes always get whole kernel, not cracked or rolled. You want the wrapper mother nature put on each kernel intact.

The usual way to clean feed corn is to winnow it. Basically pour it slowly onto a big clean tarp or bed sheet and let the wind blow the stalks and leaves and such away as it falls. drop it from 5 or 6 feet up. An electric fan will work as well.

Just keep winnowing until you are happy.
 
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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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What about wheat? No one here sells wheat but feed stores. Is there a problem with buying this wheat. Sure would be nice to buy local and not have that shipping fee to pay.
Wheat would be my choice too. Wheat is hard to find in many places. But you can find bulk popcorn cheap enough that it wouldn't be worth the hassle to buy feed corn. Popcorn makes some of the best tasting corn meal!
 

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Feed corn is the stuff the USDA rejects for human use. 99% of the time, this is because it doesn't meet the moister requirements. It either has to much or to little water. If you are not storing it it silos for a year, with it's extreme temperature swings, this doesn't mean much to you. There is the 1% chance it was rejected for something else. to much pesticide residuals is one thing. I am not trying to scare you off, just making sure you know what you are doing.

BTW, most of my carbohydrate preps, is the sacks of ground Grain I buy for my cows.... If worse comes to worse, they can eat some more grass.
 

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Some of us use only fertilizer to treat the soil. Some use only organic fertilizers. If this is a concern, you can always find a local organic farmer to buy from.

NEVER ...... NEVER ...... EVER ...... seed variety grain ...... corn, wheat, oats, soybeans ect ....... treated with chemicals for soil germination
 

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old hand
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Feed corn is the stuff the USDA rejects for human use. 99% of the time, this is because it doesn't meet the moister requirements. It either has to much or to little water. If you are not storing it it silos for a year, with it's extreme temperature swings, this doesn't mean much to you. There is the 1% chance it was rejected for something else. to much pesticide residuals is one thing. I am not trying to scare you off, just making sure you know what you are doing.
This is bologna andersed. The USDA does not 'reject for human use.'

What folks here call feed corn is #2 Yellow Dent corn.
Although most of it is fed to livestock, all of it is fit for human use.
This is what HFCS and dozens of other food ingredients are made from.
Most popular sodas are made from #2 Yellow Dent corn and water.

The corn that is packaged for sale as deer corn has been handled the same as all other #2 Yellow Dent corn all the way to the place where it was bagged. That is where my concern kicks in. Another poster mentioned insects and rodents. I don't imagine the labor in that place is the cream of any crop.

I'd do what ForestBeekeeper does ... seek out a farmer and purchase in bulk at harvest (both corn and wheat.)
 

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off-grid organic farmer
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I should point out that while I live in a rural area, it is mostly forest. Commercial Ag is nearly non-existent here. We do have a few 'big' farmers peaking out at around 1,000 acres. but not many, and we have no corporate processors. One farmer does corn with nearly 1,000 acres. Otherwise it is potatoes or broccoli. That is statewide.

Most of our corporate feed mixes are trucked in from out-of-state.

Most farmers here are small farms, saving your own seed for next years crop is common place here. Sharing seed is also common here. Two to ten acres of veggie farming is more common here. Apples, peaches, blueberries, fiddleheads, garlic, onions, leeks, are all common here; though on a small scale [less than 40 acres]. I know of one farm with 350 acres of blueberries, though I think they are the biggest blueberry producer in the state.

Some of our misunderstandings in the past on this forum have been from some posters living in Commercial Ag areas.

I know nothing about GMO corn used for HFCS except from what I see in movies and online. We do have folks who grow corn here, but we have no HFCS processors here. My understanding is that HFCS comes mostly from GMO corn.

We also have nearly zero wheat grown here. Barley, oats and corn are grown here.

Half [if not more] of our local corn production goes to heating fuel. Pellet stoves converted to burn kiln-dried corn.

The corn grown in this area, can be used for livestock feed, or it can be eaten by humans, or it can be fed into a pellet stove.

I buy grains in the fall during harvest. I store it in sealed drums with desiccant, I mix feed as I need it. My feed mixes are around 1/3 the price of commercial feed mixes I can buy in the feedstores.
 

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old hand
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One farmer does corn with nearly 1,000 acres.
... Most farmers here are small farms, saving your own seed for next years crop is common place here.
I can hardly believe that someone growing 1,000 acres of corn would not be using hybrid seed.

If it is hybrid, he isn't saving his own seed.


I know nothing about GMO corn used for HFCS except from what I see in movies and online. We do have folks who grow corn here, but we have no HFCS processors here. My understanding is that HFCS comes mostly from GMO corn.
That is because most of the corn grown in North America today is GMO.

When HFCS and ethanol production started in the midwest in the 1970s, there was no such thing as GMO.
Americans were eating HFCS for fifteen years before it was produced from GMO corn.
 
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