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So, what is the best oils, shortening, lard etc. for LTS?
Other than a few store packaged olive oil and margarine ( maybe 2 year shelf life),
all I have is dehydrated margarine and shortening in #10 cans, ( I'd guess 5 year shelf life)..
any other options for LTS?
 

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Like said... We also have home rendered, and sealed wide mouth pint jars of lard..
Easy to do, keeps well, works well in many things..

We also buy canola oil in 12-14 liter plastic bottle in a box.. We recant it into 1 liter bottles to take to the kitchen.. It keeps well in the basement cold room..

Ghee is good.... We have a lot of ghee in the foreign foods section of our groceries as there is a significant population here used to that.. The thing you have to watch as far as storage goes is there seems a lot of difference in products labeled "ghee"... Some products being little more than canned clarified butter as they are quite full of water and milk solids yet.. NOT the clear vibrant yellow color of some more quality and usually higher priced options..
 

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For truly long-term storage you are going to need to figure out how to get fresh supplies. Thus the frequent advice to plant nut trees, although a fast crop of oil hemp or similar will do you as well. Even a giant chia pet to produce more chia seeds will help. :)

There is always fully hydrogenated shortening, which is as close to immortal as a fat can come, but that's good only for calories and destroying your arteries. (And in that respect, be wary of any powdered dairy containing fat. The heating and spray process of powdering will turn its cholesterol content into oxycholesterol, which is just as bad as hydrogenated fat. In fact, any fat/fatty food that contains sterols that is subjected to high-heat spray drying to powder will develop oxysterols in the process. Shelf life isn't everything when it comes to storage food.)

For mid-term storage, there is Red Feather butter in cans that lasts 10 years on the shelf for the table and baking and lots of ghee for making whole milk out of nonfat milk powder and popping buttery popcorn as well as other high-heat cooking and frying. Ghee in metal tins, which can be found if you look (I like Green Meadow, made by a Dutch company from NZ butter), will last 3 years in the pantry, as will olive oil in cans. Lard properly clarified and stored in metal or dark glass will do the same, tallow (being more saturated) somewhat longer. Poultry fats are shorter-lived than lard but can provide vitamin K2 needed to keep your calcium in your bones and out of your arteries in addition to contributing to your essential fatty acid requirements and being just plain delicious. Among the vegetable oils, only coconut and palm ordinarily have a shelf life much longer than a year to 18 months. An unhydrogenated vegetable shortening made from those will last 3 years or more.

And in that last paragraph lies the real crux of the problem. Saturated fats last fairly well. Unsaturated ones do not. But the essential fatty acids your body requires are unsaturated fats. So in addition to looking at shelf life of fats and oils to provide calories and appetite satisfaction, you need to look to see if your storage provides enough of the essential omega 3 and omega 6 fatty acids.

Take advantage of the ability of canning to preserve fats not removed from their natural environment. Store fatty fish for their omega 3 content including fish packed in olive oil. Can your own meat with some fat included or pick something commercially canned like Russian tushonka (which does not trim all the fat from the meat before canning) or NZ corned beef from pastured cows.

Beyond that, be aware that processing and packaging can both make a huge difference in fat/oil shelf life. Any heat-extracted hexane-refined oil packaged in plastic is going to go rancid within a year if not sooner and is already working on it the second you buy it off that well-lighted store shelf. OTOH, that same oil cold-pressed and unrefined and put into metal or amber glass containers with inert gas in the dead space may well last 3 years or more.

That's the real secret to olive oil's longer shelf life. It's not a magically different mono/unsaturated oil, it's just that it's about the only oil commonly sold cold pressed and unrefined and often, although now not always, properly packaged in metal tins. (And if you buy your olive oil in a plastic bottle, you can forget about it keeping 3 years because it won't. Even a clear glass bottle will cut its shelf life in half.) Unrefined oils retain the vitamin E and other vitamins and phytonutrients that slow the development of rancidity, and cold-pressed oils have not been exposed to the high heat that accelerates it. Placing them in metal or amber glass containers when produced protects them from the light that kicks off non-oxidative rancidity, and filling the dead space in that container with nitrogen or other inert gas protects against oxidative rancidity in combination with a container completely impervious to air and humidity. (Commonly available references on shelf life of various oils are next to worthless because they pay no attention to either the extraction method or packaging of the oil analyzed.)

Case in point: Eden Foods sells olive oil, safflower oil, and sesame oil (used to also sell peanut, but alas, no longer). All are cold pressed, unrefined, and packaged in amber glass bottles under nitrogen. And they all have at least a 3-year shelf life in ordinary pantry conditions. La Tourangelle sells a number of oils in metal cans that are usually given only a 1 year shelf life or less, but all theirs last at least 2 years. If you want an oil to keep, you need to pay attention to how it was extracted, how it was refined, and how it was packaged.

On the practical side, omega 3 is usually far more lacking in our modern diets than omega 6, so for what oils you store versus longer-lived fats be aware of their omega 3 content and 3:6 ratio. Oils like coconut are useful in that they provide little of either essential fatty acid, but also won't upset the balance of essential fatty acids from elsewhere in your diet. (However, that means your daily requirement of essential fatty acids must be elsewhere in your diet.) When it comes to fats, butter, lard, and tallow from grass-fed animals have more omega 3 and a better 3:6 ratio than that from feedlot animals. (And happily, the NZ cows that produce Red Feather butter are almost entirely pastured.) Please take note that no brand-name lard is true lard any more. It is all refined, bleached, deodorized, and fully hydrogenated with BHT/BHA added as antioxidant, turned into just old-style Crisco from a pig instead of a cottonseed (new-style Crisco is no longer fully hydrogenated and no longer long keeping). You can get true unadulterated lard, but not at your local grocery store or Mexican market. Many vegetable oils, including the common cheap ones prevalent in our modern diet such as soy and canola, are heavily or entirely omega 6, which is a problem if that comprises most of the oil you consume. (Soy is also both heat and hexane extracted and refined since you can only extract much soy oil that way, and it has a totally unappetizing flavor in its natural state. Although you could cold-press canola, it is always put through the same heat and hexane process, which results in loss of omega 3 and poor shelf life for both oils.)

Also, note that few unrefined oils can withstand cooking heat of 300 to 350 and above. (Exceptions are low-acid extra virgin olive oils at the lower end of that range and macadamia and camellina oils at the higher end. Check a table of smoke points. You never want to heat a fat or oil to a higher temp than 25 degrees below its smoke point.) So you need to consider your culinary as well as your dietary requirements when choosing your fats and oils to store.

Once you have done all you can choosing the best extracting, refining, and packaging, then adding storage in a freezer will extend the shelf life of your supply out to the max possible. You can give your unrefined oils the same 10-year shelf life of your canned butter that way. Can your meat, dehydrate/freeze-dry your fruits and vegetables, and put your oils, nuts, and seeds in your freezer space and your fats in your refrigerator if there isn't enough freezer space for them as well.

And what do I store? Some palm-oil vegetable shortening and coconut oil. (I've tried palm/red palm oil, but didn't care for it other than in the shortening.) Lots of Red Feather butter. Three different olive oils, Italian, Spanish, and Greek, one certified low-acid for higher-temp cooking. Safflower oil and avocado oil for neutral oils for salad dressings/mayonnaise (the unrefined avocado also for medium-heat cooking). Sesame oil for medium-heat cooking and making peanut butter from peanut powder. (Much tastier and closer to the real thing than doing it with coconut oil, unless maybe your current real thing is peanut butter with its peanut oil substituted with cheaper tropical oil, in which case Skippy the sesame and use palm shortening/coconut oil for that agribusiness processed-food flavor and texture.) Macadamia and camellina oils for higher-heat cooking. Tallow, lard, leaf lard, and chicken, duck, and goose fats, all from pastured/free-range animals, for medium to high-heat cooking (fry up those french fries in tallow like everyone used to). Everything bought in metal tins or amber glass or immediately transferred to amber glass under inert gas if only available in clear glass. Nothing high-heat extracted or refined. The only thing bought in plastic is the shortening, which is immediately transferred to metal cans. In addition, I have lots of fatty canned fish and meat and many pounds of nuts and seeds in the freezer. I also have commercial mayo made with avocado oil in my pantry along with tahini and cashew, almond, and lots of peanut butter. (Being just-us-peanuts natural peanut butter packaged in a glass jar, my PB has more than a year of pantry shelf life, but for 5 years you need that peanut powder and refrigerated sesame oil.)

YMMV from mine. It probably will given that I am one of those much-maligned tree-huggin' natural foodies that believes sometimes organic is better, assuming you avoid the deceptive greenwashing now prevalent. But the general principles I followed in choosing my fat and oil storage are valid for anyone.

ETA: If you need to repackage oil because either you simply can't find it in metal/amber glass or perhaps because, like Wyobuckaroo4, you want to save some money by buying it in a large quantity bag-in-box (I can save money on camellina or macadamia oils by doing that versus buying in individual amber/green glass bottles), then repackage into amber glass with a little added natural rosemary-ascorbyl palmitate antioxidant and fill the dead space with a spray from an inert gas canister designed for oil storage. That's almost as good as if they did it right in the first place assuming you can buy your oil direct from the producer very soon after original packaging.

Spray can of inert gas for oil storage.
Argon gas wine saver spray (argon is argon, works for oil too)
Rosemary antioxidant (use with ascorbyl palmitate, the oil-soluble form of vitamin C)

Comparison of antioxidative and synergistic effects of rosemary extract with ??-tocopherol, Ascorbyl palmitate and citric acid in sunflower oil

Natural Antioxidants: Sources, Compounds, Mechanisms of Action, and Potential Applications
 

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I have pork lard that has lasted well over 5 years.

I rendered it myself.

Many of my customers swear by pork lard.

Post-SHTF I think it is the ideal.
We ate a 4yr old ham last year. Didnt taste any different than the newer one off the same pig..so I would also say there right.
 

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Lard is probably the easiest to acquire, it stores well and can be frozen. Lard is my LTS go to for fat. I don't prep a lot of cooking oil as it can go rancid over time. What I do have on hand gets rotated.

I think fat is often overlooked as a prep, mainly because it is so common place. I have a hunch that fat and fatty food, is probably going to be one the first things to go away in a wide spread disaster.

Aside from lard, I check the fat content on canned foods...things like Spam are a good way to add fat to your diet. Any way you cut it you're going to need fat...It's a legitimate prep.
 

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The more saturated, the longer it lasts. Coconut oil is a good one. So is palm oil. And you can freeze oils, effectively stopping the clock on their aging until you take them out.
We have a freezer shelf dedicated to shortening and butter when it's on sale. We vacuum pack 3 blocks of butter in each bag, to keep it from soaking up freezer odor. I have 20+ pounds of pork fat to be rendered. Will can it and store it in the freezer too. Just had a new whirlpool 19cf upright freezer delivered today. Almost 40 cf of freezer space now


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When I get back to canning this hunting season I plan on adding a few tablespoons of pork fat to my canned deer and hog. It will solidify at the top of the jar and can be used for gravy or cooked in with the meat. All my canning life I've tried to can the leanest cuts of meat. I'd rather have the fat now. If I don't need it,throw it away. The days we're living in sure make you evaluate your preps.


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We rendered the fat from the pig we had butchered into 6 1/2 gallon jars. Should last us a good long time. And when we start running low (or even well before then) we still have more pigs to provide additional lard. (And bacon, hams, chops, cutlets, roasts, ribs, etc...)
 

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We rendered the fat from the pig we had butchered into 6 1/2 gallon jars. Should last us a good long time. And when we start running low (or even well before then) we still have more pigs to provide additional lard. (And bacon, hams, chops, cutlets, roasts, ribs, etc...)
LOOONG term you need to think about providing your own source. I really don't want to get into livestock, so I bought an oil press. I tried growing some oil crops like sunflowers, oil radishes, safflower, etc, but nothing really works out well. BUT, I grow a lot of squashes and the seeds have some oil in them. I don't know how pressing squash seed for oil will work out in the long term. Maybe I'll have to barter for an occasional hog.
 

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LOOONG term you need to think about providing your own source. I really don't want to get into livestock, so I bought an oil press. I tried growing some oil crops like sunflowers, oil radishes, safflower, etc, but nothing really works out well. BUT, I grow a lot of squashes and the seeds have some oil in them. I don't know how pressing squash seed for oil will work out in the long term. Maybe I'll have to barter for an occasional hog.
Did you not get enough oil from the sunflowers, or did the sunflowers not grow well in your area?
 

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I tried black oil sunflowers. The crop was poor and I really didn't see a way to shell seeds from the heads by hand.
For anyone with better luck growing a crop:
Sunflower seed huller and oil press

ETA:

(If you just need to shell a handful of squash, melon, or sunflower seeds, the Chinese have this little gizmo:
Hand crank melon seed peeler/sunflower seed opener

Rather than building your own oil press, there are a couple of ready-to-go manual options.

The Piteba does the job, but is designed to make small quantities:
Piteba Nut and Seed Oil Press

Then there is this, engineered with a little bigger hopper and a bottle to collect the defatted press cake solids as well as an oil bottle:
Household Manual Oil Press for Cold Extraction
 

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unless your freezer door can barely be closed - you have room for some long term storage of some fats & oils - it'll last just about forever >>> best deal is a poly bucket of lard but the retail 1lb blocks allows for a slow buy & store program ...

you'll be looking for fat in your diet when things go tough ....
 

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Store lard! It may not have two of the essential fatty acids but nearly any vegetable you eat - corn, wheat, etc - will. IDK what all the fuss us about.
If you are going to stress about relying on lard, just throw a bottle of fish oil pills in the freezer.
 

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USDA numbers for Lard, per tablespoon
Omega 3 128 mg
Omega 6 1300 mg
Omega 6:3 ratio 10.6:1

But it depends on what the pig eats and how the lard is processed. Some farmers did a study on that.
Fatty Acid Comparisons of Grain and Forage-Fed Pork
On 100% forage, the numbers were:
6:3 14.85/2.82 or 5.15:1
On 50% forage:
6:3 17.20:1.75 or 9.88:1
On 100% grain:
6:3 15.24:1.10 or 13.84:1
And refined, hydrogenated store-bought lard:
6:3 19.79:0.67 or 29.4: 1

The ideal 6:3 ratio in one's overall diet is considered to be 1:1 with anything up to 4:1 considered healthy. Lard can be a good source of essential fatty acids and a good choice of storage fat when balanced in the overall diet with a few other things a bit higher in omega 3, although it depends on what kind of lard you are talking about.

Do you ever seriously research anything before spouting off, Puttster, or is it that you just amuse yourself by trolling this board?
 
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