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Hank Hill in Lingerie
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Discussion Starter #1
Anybody else out there feeling the raw edges of fatigue?

I'm not debilitated, far from it, nor exhausted. I realized last night, however, that I'm feeling the stress. It's not visible, sometimes not palpable, not even to me most of the time, but it's there. I realized last night that I've been living with it for months now re: this pandemic. I've been mostly ignoring the stress, working through it.

Being prepared is the best remedy and prophylactic against acute panic. Got it. Believe it. Live it. I/we have been using this calm before the storm to methodically, quietly, reinforce our position.

Not panicked. Not unprepared. Not freaking out.

But if I'm being honest with myself, I'm feeling the constant stress.

We tied up a couple of loose ends in town yesterday. There's no reason for us to go out at all today. I'm looking forward to it. I plan to sleep, and sleep, and sleep- which is my gold standard indicator that I'm coping with chronic stress.

Honestly, sleeping it off is probably the very best thing I can do right now.

Also, focusing on gratitude: we have the time, the resources, and the previously acquired skill sets and experience to simply step through the preps without a huge learning curve.

Husband is recently retired so I'm not doing it alone, I'm not physically or psychologically alone, which is yet another huge blessing. It took a little bit to get Hubs on board and up to speed with this particular crisis; due to a very demanding job, most of the nuts and bolts of prepping was on me for decades. He'd show up for the heavy lifting and he largely funded the effort, but the details and the situational awareness were on me until now. I was fine with that, really.

I think his initial reluctance in the present situation was part denial- the man just retired, we were looking forward to traveling together after years of deferred gratification, and now, *this.* We both get it- the ability to stay at home together and face this challenge together is much more precious than any recreational travel- but I can see how he would feel, cheated? Part of his initial reluctance, I think, was pure denial, and I don't blame him for that. And part of it was simply not recognizing the tea leaves, much less reading them.

Even though he was a tough sell on this one at first, he didn't get in my way and he helped when I asked. And he kept reading, and watching, and listening to the news. He's not stupid. He soon began to read the negative space, what isn't being said, for himself. He began to see and accept the evolving situation for what it is. And all of the sudden, we were on the same page. When Hubs showed up, HE SHOWED UP. He's almost (but not quite, LOL) a step ahead of me now.

I have much for which to be thankful... I'm concentrating on that, and on the finer details. in these last handful of moments before the storm hits.

Anyway, anyone else out there feeling stress fatigue? How are you dealing with it, including or besides, prepping?
 

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Just stop for day.This may be a long term problem so don't burn out.Shut off the news for a couple of days. Watch a few funny shows or movies..make it a comedy marathon. Play a game of cards with your husband. Chat with the grand kids. Plan a new crafty project. The world is not gonna change in the next 48 hours. Give yourself a break or you will get sick ( and it probably won't be corona virus)馃槈
 

Hank Hill in Lingerie
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Discussion Starter #3
^^ All good ideas, thank you. :)

Interesting that you mention watching a comedy. Humor is my default stress relief, dark humor if necessary and appropriate. Besides wanting to take the mother of all naps, another indication that I'm burning out is that my sense of humor went MIA. ALL OF THE SUDDEN, THIS SHIZZLE ISNT FUNNY. NOTHING IS FUNNY. I'M NOT EVEN FUNNY. I'M NOT EVEN RIDICULOUS.

When I lose the urge to laugh at myself (which is typically near constant, like a default setting) I'm for sure burning out.

I also have a gut feeling that the burn out might be my subconscious telling me something: this stage of the scenario is coming to a close. We've done what we can do. Time grows short. Sleep. Take that big nap, we'll all need the rest and mental acuity presently. =/
 

Crazy Cat Lady
Plan to Alamo at home.
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I don't have a bed. I have a tiny cot and cats that love to sleep with me...

I am beyond tired, this has been going on for months. When I get my bed back I plan to spend 12 hours flat on my face. I have found sleep very helpful to managing my illness.
 

Sinner w/ a great Savior
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This is a marathon, not a sprint, so conserve your energy. Good thing you recognized you're getting fatigued OldSoul. Now you know going forward what your limits are and that you don't want to expend too much time and energy studying this. Knowing your own limits is a part of preparedness :thumb:
 

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Last weekend, I made a bird house out of scrap lumber and fixed another. Now I have birds moving in to nest. I'm drawing up plans to make a fountain sculpture out of left over wire and copper tubing. Something to do now that I have everything else ready.

I churned the compost bins and planted flower seeds in containers with my daughter. General life goes on stuff that I've used for years to reduce stress.
 

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My husband recently read that staring into the eyes of your pet will produce dopamine (I think --- anyway, a pleasant chemical release) for both you and your pet. I tried it to help combat this dark feeling of fatigue. It worked.

So grab a critter and stare into his eyes. :)
 

I am interrogative, yes.
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Anybody else out there feeling the raw edges of fatigue? [...] But if I'm being honest with myself, I'm feeling the constant stress.
Same here. I'm trying to get in a short nap during the day now.

Also, focusing on gratitude: we have the time, the resources, and the previously acquired skill sets and experience to simply step through the preps without a huge learning curve.
This, so much this. When I got back into the car after buying groceries yesterday I gave thanks to God for the food, the money to pay for it, and car to transport it, and the gas to fuel the car.

My husband recently read that staring into the eyes of your pet will produce dopamine (I think --- anyway, a pleasant chemical release) for both you and your pet. I tried it to help combat this dark feeling of fatigue. It worked. So grab a critter and stare into his eyes. :)
Pets are amazing during hard times. My dogs are getting lots of extra pets, hugs, and love these days!

How are you dealing with it, including or besides, prepping?
My housemate and I try to find stuff to laugh at - really funny stuff, big belly laughs, tearing up laughs. It can be funny pet videos on YouTube or the /r/funny subreddit or movie/tv shows outtakes and bloopers or anything at all that makes us laugh. We make that happen EVERY day. It literally changes your body chemistry and helps your immune system. I feel like there's this enormous wave that's about to come crashing down on everything, and the laughter is a nice break from that feeling of impending doom.

Outtakes from the old Carol Burnett tv show are some of my favorites. Harvey Korman cracked up at everything. And if you haven't seen Tim Conway tell his infamous elephant story, you're in for a treat. It's on YouTube (warning: it's not for children). Watch the long version. :thumb:
 

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My husband recently read that staring into the eyes of your pet will produce dopamine (I think --- anyway, a pleasant chemical release) for both you and your pet. I tried it to help combat this dark feeling of fatigue. It worked.

So grab a critter and stare into his eyes. :)
On the other hand....



Interesting post.

Last night about midnight I hit the wall and had to crawl into bed and pass out.

For many, this may not mean much....but for me....that was going to bed 6-7 hours early.

I don't know what part of it is Corona or what part of it is the REST of my life which is generally just one long string of personal SHTFs.

I also blame daylight savings time.

And here I am awake at 11am....3-4 hours early for me....this is going to be a messed up day.
 

Comic, not your lawyer!
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This is a stressful event, and for me part of the stress is trying to convince the un-informed about this severity. There's so many people in my close and acquaintance circles that just don't understand and just continue to regurgitate the "flu" nonsense without a ounce of critical thinking. And YT social media folks I generally respect who just don't seem to grasp the exponential math angle of this. I have lost respect for a lot of people who just don't grasp the gravity of what's going on, and just keep making fart jokes over it.

I mean, we're watching the beginning phases of a slow moving world pandemic with massive amounts of suffering and death and 2nd and 3rd order effects, financial markets melt down, supply chains broken, complete change in social behavior, and the probable erosion of our civil rights, and a possibly change in the outcome of the 2020 elections... More confirmed deaths now than 9/11/01 (and probably a magnitude of more if we had real numbers). Who ignores or jokes about it??

It doesn't help I've not felt well myself for about a month or two. I had an exhausting 2019 with a lot of big events that carried into 2020 and then this virus started spreading. The virus, the markets, debating with folks, and balancing work has been exhausting.

The other angle is cutting out most social engagements. I canceled some bible study and stopped going to church, and those are important to me. Dating has been essentially eliminated, as has the gym and other outlets.

I wish I had someone I could "bug in" with to ride this out...

I've found that focusing on work and hobbies at home, and trying to get in some exercise, and staying in touch with friends over the phone, is going to be the key to get thru this.
 

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Last weekend, I made a bird house out of scrap lumber and fixed another. Now I have birds moving in to nest. I'm drawing up plans to make a fountain sculpture out of left over wire and copper tubing. Something to do now that I have everything else ready.

I churned the compost bins and planted flower seeds in containers with my daughter. General life goes on stuff that I've used for years to reduce stress.


A wise older man once taught me this. When the mind is fatigued from stress, you have to fatigue the body. With manual labor or fasting. It works.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Hank Hill in Lingerie
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Discussion Starter #14
No stress.

Get prepared, then no more stress.
Am prepared. Actually quite comfortable. It's the stress of watching a slow train wreck. We only control a tiny part of the horizontal and the vertical at any given moment. It's a lot of control in terms of your personal life, and it does make a big difference, but it's a tiny sliver of control in terms of the impact of the entire situation.

I don't know (and can't control) what my neighbors do, what friends and families do, and I have some but not complete control over how that might intersect with our lives.

I can't control the stock market and that's gonna have a huge impact on us.

Etc.

I get it: do what you can, then don't worry about what you cannot control.

Doesn't mean that the crisis goes away. You've simply put some distance between the train wreck and yourself. It's like sitting in the circle of light around a campfire on a dark night, with the wolves circling just beyond.

You're OK, but the threat is, right there. It's living next door to the threat 24/7. I suppose that at any given moment, any/many of us are whistling through the graveyard, living up next to threats of which we are blissfully unaware.

I sort of don't want to get acclimated to it, because I don't want to become complacent.

On the other hand, there is this:

I'd sort of forgotten some big chunks of who I am. I broke out and exercised some knowledge base and skill sets that I've let collect dust for a few years. That felt good, reassuring, competent. So it's not all bad.

Stress isn't all bad- it pushes you to do things that need to be done.

I'm not complaining about the stress, I'm acknowledging that I found myself a bit fatigued from living with it for over a month. And you all are right- it's not a sprint. We are actually still in the early days of this crisis.
 

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We鈥檙e stressed. We are both having allergic reactions to heavy tree pollen so misery doesn鈥檛 help. Our son lives next door and daughter a couple miles away. We have a family text group so keeping each other up to date but it can be to much. I鈥檓 trying to ready them psychologically to what can happen. It seems surreal.

We are going to deal with health problems, financial upheavals and emotional heartbreak. I feel blessed because we are about as ready as we can get but the 鈥榠t鈥檚 on flu鈥 is making me a little nuts also.

I鈥檓 trying to ready the garden and it helps having grandsons who can share the workload. Being outside with plants is a big plus. Feel blessed to have Boston terriers who sleep under my covers now I鈥檓 going to make them give me eye contact.
 

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Am prepared. Actually quite comfortable. It's the stress of watching a slow train wreck. We only control a tiny part of the horizontal and the vertical at any given moment. It's a lot of control in terms of your personal life, and it does make a big difference, but it's a tiny sliver of control in terms of the impact of the entire situation.

I don't know (and can't control) what my neighbors do, what friends and families do, and I have some but not complete control over how that might intersect with our lives.

I can't control the stock market and that's gonna have a huge impact on us.

Etc.

I get it: do what you can, then don't worry about what you cannot control.

That's not what I mean.

I've locked my gate, told my friends I'm self isolating (yes, a couple think I'm crazy) and actually put "caution tape" across my driveway inside my gate, but far from the house. (Backups are good.)

I CAN control how they interact with my life.
One offered to bring me anything I might need today. I said "No thanks"
If one walked 1/2 mile and ignored my wishes and knocked on my door the yard would get a Spray down with 1:50 bleach solution.

If someone in my "quarantine campsites" do that they will get no help from me. (Makes it unlikely they will do so.)

I got out the stock market before the fall, and looking at it as an opportunity to buy on sale.
Financial preps are preps.
 

Hank Hill in Lingerie
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Discussion Starter #18
^^ That's interesting, because I'm finding that late winter gardening is providing a welcomed challenge and distraction.

I planted spinach, lettuce and snow pea seeds outside in the container gardens in the last week in February. We had a cold snap immediately after planting and germination stalled.

I over planted more spinach and lettuce seeds last week and yesterday, and added beet seeds to the lettuce containers last week as well. The snow peas are in with the spinach.

I've been pacing around the container gardens like an expectant father consigned to the waiting room. We had a warm up over the past couple of days, and I'm seeing lettuce and spinach seed germination from the first plantings, both yesterday and today. Nothing on the snow peas yet. I'll give it a few more days before I over plant those. The beet seeds need several more days.

Almost every seed pod germinated in my AeroGardens, both the proprietary pods that came with my newfangled AeroGarden, and my home fabricated pods in my older units. I'm waiting on one cilantro pod in my fabricated pods, and a proprietary dill pod, to sprout. Haven't given up yet. Cilantro can be notoriously stubborn about sprouting and can take a while. Ditto dill. If those pods don't sprout in a week, I'll replant them.

We purchased a couple of LED grow lights after I received the LED light AeroGarden- I was that impressed with the LED light panels. We are starting tomatoes and peppers under one of the grow lights for summer planting, and I have lettuce seeds starting in potting soil under the other light. So, either indoors or outdoors, we'll have fresh lettuce.

The grow lights and AeroGarden lights, particularly the LED lights, light up a dark corner of our kitchen counter, and throw a good amount of daylight spectrum light into the kitchen. It's nice. I think it's having a positive effect on our moods!

So gardening, both indoor and out, is a pleasant diversion. :) :)

I've broken out the shortwave radio and I will re-acclimate myself to scanning for foreign broadcasts.

Other things are going on as well, of course.

Several of you have mentioned on other threads that 2019 was challenging, and then we rolled right into coronavirus in 2020. We had our challenges last year as well. In a way, this situation is actually a forced reprieve. Honestly, that's not all bad, but I'm very sorry that it's coming at the expense of other people's health and the economy.
 

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I have to admit I am feeling some stress, however, as my wife and I are first responders we are screwed. I keep thinking about having everything set for my kids, and working on my 70+yr old parents. The boy (9) is all set to take a sniper position with my m-4. The food is stocked, the water is good, the being there for them is the concern. When this smacks the US and schools close, quarantine goes into effect, when I have to go in to work and so does the wife it will get ugly
 

Hank Hill in Lingerie
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Discussion Starter #20
That's not what I mean.

I've locked my gate, told my friends I'm self isolating (yes, a couple think I'm crazy) and actually put "caution tape" across my driveway inside my gate, but far from the house. (Backups are good.)

I CAN control how they interact with my life.
One offered to bring me anything I might need today. I said "No thanks"
If one walked 1/2 mile and ignored my wishes and knocked on my door the yard would get a Spray down with 1:50 bleach solution.

If someone in my "quarantine campsites" do that they will get no help from me. (Makes it unlikely they will do so.)

I got out the stock market before the fall, and looking at it as an opportunity to buy on sale.
Financial preps are preps.
I understand. You do you. :) Prepping is not "one size fits all," you know that better than anyone.

I do not believe that it's possible, nor necessary, nor realistic, nor even helpful to completely eliminate stress in a crisis. Even if we mitigate it for ourselves, the crisis remains. It's still there. I understand the concept of "Not my problem," but I still hold that complete stress mitigation is unrealistic and not helpful. For instance, yes, you potentially solve a problem of exposure by preparing yourself and reassuring yourself that you'll douse an over insistent neighbor with a bleach solution. This is not a normal and socially accepted greeting. Unless you are remarkably detached, just the idea that you'll douse a neighbor with a bleach solution puts everyone in the situation out of the familiar comfort zone. The departure from the norm creates the tension called "stress."

If you have no stress, you have no pressure or motivation to change, to step up, to step out of one's comfort zone. Per above, it's not unwelcomed- but it's not a particularly zen or restful way to live.

You aren't doing it wrong, and neither am I, and the presence or absence of stress is not the correct metric for measuring effectiveness or a correct response. Stress is simply another factor in the landscape. Think of it as the mental exercise of putting prepping plans into operational status. It's the mental equivalent of driving to the store, hauling groceries home, hauling them in the house, climbing up and down on a step ladder to rotate stock and stack the food in the pantry. It's an exertion. It's not wrong, it's not bad, and you honestly cannot avoid it if you want groceries in the house. "Stress" is sort of the mental equivalent. It can get tiring, even though it's necessary, productive, and a completely appropriate response to stimulus.

The groceries analogy isn't perfect, but it's the best one I can think of at the moment.
 
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