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Lets say some kind of SHTF / TEOTWAWKI situation happens tomorrow, what would your long term farming, gardening and hunting plans be?

Do you plan on hunting for most of your food from livestock, gardening, hunting or a combination of food sources?

Long term survival plans after SHTF



One of the common theories in the various survivalist communities is that a family will grab their bug out bags, head to the hills where they will live off the land.

In theory this may sound fine and dandy.

In reality, chances are the family is going to starve to death.

If various humanoids have gone extinct over the past 100,000 years, what makes a family think they can survive with very few primitive survival skills?

The long term survivability of humans is directly related to much much food we can produce, and not how much food we can hunt or gather. There is a physical limitation to how many miles a person can walk in a day. There is a physical limitation to how much weight a person can carry.

Primitive tribes were able to overcome some of those obstacles by being in great physical shape and living a hunter-gather lifestyle their entire lives. How can some couch potato expect to kill a 300 pound hog, then pack that hog 3 or 4 miles back to the camp.

Our sedentary lifestyle in no way compares to the lifestyle of a hunter-gatherer.

Livestock



While reading through the Smithsonian website, I came across an interesting article about when humans first domesticated livestock.

What happened around 10,000 years ago to make humans start domesticating livestock?

Studies show:

Goats – 10,000 years ago

Sheep – 11,000 years ago

Cow – 10,000 years ago

Pig – 9,000 – 12,000 years ago

Chicken – around 8,000 years ago

What made someone catch that first pig or goat? I imagine the driving factor was to have food close at hand. Instead of having to hunt or catch food everyday, why not have a goat, chicken, pig,,, around the house? Instead of having to hunt a wild pig, just go butcher a piglet.

How does this relate to survivalism?

Consider that humans domesticated livestock around 10,000 years ago, while the Neanderthals died out as recently as 24,000 – 28,000 years ago.

From examples set by by previous humanoids, every species of prehumans that has relied on a hunter-gather lifestyle either went extinct, or never made it past the stone age. There is no evidence of Neanderthal or Cro-Magnon having livestock. Where are those humanoids now? Extinct.

There are still groups around the world that live a hunter-gather lifestyle, but those groups live a substance, stone age lifestyle.

It was only after the domestication of livestock that mankind was able to step out of the stone age.

Gardening

Squash domesticated around 10,000 BC

Pea domesticated around 5,000 BC

Corn – around 2,500 BC

Radishes – mature quickly, with sprouts ready to pick in 15 days in good conditions.

Romans ate types of peas, beans and greens.

Native Americans grew squash, corn and peas.

Instead of having to forage for food, why not have food growing at your back door.

The question about livestock also relates to a garden. What made primitive man start growing their own food? It was probably the ease of access.

Do we think gardening helped bring mankind out of the stone age? Sure it did. Instead of having to forage for food, people picked what they wanted, then had free time to do other stuff.

It was that free time and improved nutrition that helped move mankind out of the stone age, through the iron age and finally into the space age.

Hunting after SHTF

The greater competition for resources, the less resources will be available.

During the great depression whitetail deer and turkey was hunted to extinction in areas all across the nation. In southeast Texas, whitetail deer and wild turkeys had to be imported to reestablish the populations. It took the southeast Texas wild turkey population close to 40 years before numbers became viable enough for hunting to be allowed.

But yet some people think wildlife is a never ending supply of meat?

During a long term SHTF / TEOTWAWKI survival situation, hunting is going to deplete local wildlife to extinction levels.

What are your renewable food sources

Besides stockpiling canned foods, #10 cans of freeze dried foods, and food stored in mylar bags, what are your renewable food sources?

Do you have a homestead that you can use as a Bug Out Location?

Do you have access to land where you can raise a garden have livestock?

Or do you plan on bugging out to the wilderness to live off the land?
 

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Absolutely, I think there a lot of people out there that will get the surprise of their life when their ideas of heading for the hills lands them in a refugee camp within a week. At least twice a year I grab a minimal amount of gear and walk into the woods for a few days. It's hard and there is no way I could support my family that way. My kids are 7 and 4 and an infant adoption in the works. The idea of bugging out is almost unimaginable right now. If I had a sustainable BOL I might, but I don't so it's bugging in at all costs for me.
 

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I have a crossbow for hunting, a large rat trap which I hope I'll never have to use and heirloom seeds for two seasons of a basic small garden.
Cucumber
Tomatoe
Beans
Zucchini
The seeds will need to be replaced every 2-4 years depending of the type. The idea being that once harvested the new plants would provide seeds for subsequent seasons.
I also fish and expect to be near a body of water. Basic fishing kit is in both BOBs.
 

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MOLON LABE!
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Head back to the family farm, which is less than a mile away as the crow flies. There is a well, hand dug in the late 20's, and ten acres of cherry trees, along with a couple hundred feet of Columbia riverfront.

Of course, I'd be taking the livestock along for the ride, and would probably have to do some trading to get a few hogs.

Farming communities are great!
 

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id like to know a good site to go to...trying to find stuff to add to my collection all ready....i live on a farm so pretty much looking for medical supplies and the like...
 

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well I have a tractor and the plans to make a wood gas generator for it I would lose some power so I would remove one of the blades from my plow make it a 1 blade plow but my seed drill can be pulled by animals or tractor

I have a old 2 blade plow
box scrape
hey fork
2 row seed drill
horse plow
a million hand tools bit and braces 2 man saws sythes anvil (soon a forge) old cane mill to make sorghum animal powered (but has an attachment to use pto on tractor)

lots of stuff I do not plan to bug out but bug in and farm and help those willing to work in the garden I feel investing in infrastructure is more important than worrying about bugging out or stockpiling stuff as with infrastructure I can replace what I use where as a pile of food once its gone its gone
 

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For the people up north a lot depends on the season the SHTF with regards to gardening and hunting.

One thing about the "Native Americans" these stone age people(until the "white" man came) lived off the "knowledge" gathered over hundreds/thousands of years. This is not knowlege that can be gained overnight no matter how good the book.

I take an all of the above approach. Living is SWFl. the growing season is all year long, access to fresh and salt water resources is also available all year long. Hunting all depends on the game's ability to recover following the human die off. Until that time I have no plans to wander to far from home.

Farming is a full time occupation. If game is scarce time may not be available to "hunt". This may open up the possibility for those with the skill to become "professional" hunters.

Most of us would be starting from scratch in your scenario. Gardening to feed a family is called farming. Most of the meat we would end up eating would be whatever varmits we killed when protecting the crops.
 

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We already have gardening plans in place. We have a 50 x 100 garden that is fenced in with Americna wire fencing with the ability to put up electric wire on the top with solar power. We also have hundreds of seed packets and the know how and ability to harvest our own seeds from our crops. We have working compost piles, and chickens and I'm hoping to add raising pigs this year. We also have the knowledge and practice of being able to harvest edibles from the woods and how to hunt/fish from the surrounding lakes and woods.

One thing we have started on this year is edible landscaping on our 5 acres by planting things that can be eaten but are not always recognized as food by the average person IE; Jerusalum artichokes, currant bushes, day lillies, may apples, etc. We have also been planting native species of edible plants in the surrounding state land that surrounds many of the areas around us, that way if we need to evacuate our land we know we have plated things in other areas around us that we can harvest in an emergency situation.
 

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--Whatever your plans, remember that you will have to travel farther and farther for fish and game and when you do, you will have to transport it....without gas sooner or later.

--You will have to defend yourself and game/fish all the way home. Many wont bother hunting/fishing...they will just wait for others to do so and take yours.

--Who is defending your home, family, gardens, livestock while you are away hunting/fishing?

--How are you defending your gardens and livestock from predatory masses on the move? Or raiding groups?

Just some things to consider when you plan.....


Yours truly,
Debbie Downer
 

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--Whatever your plans, remember that you will have to travel farther and farther for fish and game and when you do, you will have to transport it....without gas sooner or later.

--You will have to defend yourself and game/fish all the way home. Many wont bother hunting/fishing...they will just wait for others to do so and take yours.

--Who is defending your home, family, gardens, livestock while you are away hunting/fishing?

--How are you defending your gardens and livestock from predatory masses on the move? Or raiding groups?

Just some things to consider when you plan.....


Yours truly,
Debbie Downer
Some real food for thought there. I believe you are correct in your assessment.
 

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Right now I am living in an area that I do not like. Can't leave atm cause I am taking care of my 93 yr old gram. So, I am getting ready to go in-depth learning & practicing aquaponics. That will give me some experience, a start to my veggie dehydrating food storage, and even try my hand at fish jerky. Great thing is it is portable for when I move.

I am NOT a wealthy person. Shoot, in this economy I can't even find part time work. Technically, I work for my Gram. She is a farmer's daughter & grew up in the Depression. She is also a closet prepper. So, she is willing to help out with some funds, but I get to do all the work. I am fine by this! ;) It helps ALL of us, give me the experience that she can't give me using the knowledge that she & others DID give me.

I have always had a thirst for knowledge about how things were done before the "industrial Age". How food was preserved, cooked, and anything having to do with keeping a small village. To keep myself occupied on long trips, I have made notes on what skills, areas of interest, and such would be needed in a post-eotwawki situations. However, if was going for a more self-sufficient lifestyle NOW, it could also work. I learned early, and WAY before coming a prepper, that could not do it all alone. There was no way, and would be dead soon from any number of reasons. I have MANY "old-fashioned" skills, and I am ready, willing, able, and working towards learning many more. I might not be able to shoot a gun well, but I know how to keep life a bit more comfortable & healthy for those that do.

So, I am adding a form of gardening that I can do NOW, and it should be able to help out no matter where I go (if it is before the SHTF). Once I am able to get to a place where I can do more with a larger garden, livestock, and such, I will get experience & more knowledge. Luckily, I learn quickly! (My only saving grace...)
 

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I figure a lot depends on what brings on the circumstances..A comet smackin into us,EMPs,etc..Somehow,I don't picture it like some of these hollywood scenarios...There will be places to avoid if ya got any common sense...Detroit city comes to mind,any city for that matter...Alot of the masses will be so Dumfounded that they won't have a clue what their priorities are for a while...Martial Law will no doubt be instantly in effect,but who's gonna know if communications are nonexistant..Figure gonna have to play it by ear as circumstances arise...Have to give this one some more Thought....Good lookin Hen...
 

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I recommend folks purchase some steel traps and learn another survival skill. With today's fur prices you can even make a little money.

This magazine is a great place to start. http://www.furfishgame.com/
I'm with you too. There's something to be said for being able to let the traps "hunt" for you while you're doing other things. I had 80 traps out this summer in 265 acres of corn, got a pile of raccoons as well as a few porkys, rabbits and squirrels. Hoping to get my license and get into it more for the hides in the next year.
 

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Morakai, that sounds very smart. You are adapting to your particular situation.

The skills you are developing/want to develop will also make you valuable to a group after SHTF...we all cannot go it alone.

Actually, I doubt most can....not keeping in mind the number of challenges we will face.
 

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I live on a small farm and already grow the vast majority of my food. We haven't bought vegetables in 3 years. We have apple, peach and cherry trees, springs 200 yards from the house that flow even in the driest years, just finished a new pig pen. We have pheasants that live in the ditch by the house and chickens in a large coop and covered run. House is set up for wood heat and kerosene lanterns and lamps plus I have hand powered tools to back up all my powered ones. Even have horses for transportation.
 

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Morakai, that sounds very smart. You are adapting to your particular situation.

The skills you are developing/want to develop will also make you valuable to a group after SHTF...we all cannot go it alone.

Actually, I doubt most can....not keeping in mind the number of challenges we will face.

Thanks! I am very good at adapting. I think the only problem I face is where to go to when it is time to leave Florida. I am not that strong physically... I am more a planner & organizer than anything. I can if I have to, but takes way longer. I know enough about carpentry, electrical, plumbing to be dangerous or to know when to call in a professional. ;)

I am an experienced Quartermaster though, and have made sure I had enough to feed & water approx 40 people for 2 weeks without electricity (Pennsic for those that know SCA). Have to admit that I had enough left over to be able to send everyone off at the end with enough food, water & snacks to get them home. One luxury we had was ice for help keep some drinks & milk cool. Oh, and was able to stay under the budget & we ate like kings! :D:

So, I know that I have some great skills for before & after a situation was to hit the fan for a group. Just a matter of finding a good group to work with... :taped::upsidedown: Knowing how to do aquaponics would just be a bonus! (with the right set-up could even "garden" all year round!)
 

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What a great thread. I agree that bugging out is going to be difficult for many people. That is why I have moved out of town on a few acres in a nice little farm community about 20 miles from town.

I have been putting off alot of the learning and have been going at it too slow. Thanks for the wake up call ... time to get out and finally build that chicken coop and learn how to prepare the goats out in the yard for the diner table.
 
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