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Emergency Manager
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It sounds like a similar situation to Hawaii. The Provincial Government was conducting an internal exercise, probably clicked the wrong field, (I assume they use something similar to IPAWS or WEA) then sent the message.

There are of course some out there claiming that something actually did happen and it's being covered up. The problem with those theories is that radioactive releases are impossible to keep secret... as the Soviets found out the hard way in 1986.
 

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Grevcon 10
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It sounds like a similar situation to Hawaii. The Provincial Government was conducting an internal exercise, probably clicked the wrong field, (I assume they use something similar to IPAWS or WEA) then sent the message.

There are of course some out there claiming that something actually did happen and it's being covered up. The problem with those theories is that radioactive releases are impossible to keep secret... as the Soviets found out the hard way in 1986.


Absolutely reasonable that something did happen, but it was handled and they got it under control without any significant harm. The message didn't say anything was released. It actually said nothing had been released and no action was needed. It was basically just a "Hey, pay attention and be ready to do something in case this goes bad."

Since no harm was done and it wasn't really a big deal in the end it makes perfect sense that any public official would conclude that the public knowing about it could only have negative effects and no positives. People would probably start freaking out and causing problems trying to get the plant shut down and everyone fired or tossed out of office.
 

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Registered
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Ever wonder the outcome if you rode slowley through a suburban neighborhood on a calm clear Sunday morning with a bull horn, and shouting: "remain calm, there is no reason for alarm, remain calm, ...

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
 

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Born 120 years too late.
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CHINA SYNDROME.. anyone????
 

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Emergency Manager
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What are the different emergency levels at Canadian nuclear plants?
They classify them similar to the US:
reportable event: an event affecting the nuclear facility that would be of concern to the offsite authorities responsible for public safety

abnormal incident: an abnormal occurrence at the nuclear facility that may have a significant cause and/or may lead to more serious consequences

site area emergency: a serious malfunction that results or may result in an emission at a later time

general emergency: an ongoing atmospheric emission of radioactive material, or one likely within a short time frame, as a result of a more severe accident
https://nuclearsafety.gc.ca/eng/act...ublished/html/regdoc2-10-1/index.cfm#sec2-2-2


The US levels are:
Notification of Unusual Event (NOUE) – Events are in progress or have occurred which indicate a potential degradation of the level of safety of the plant or indicate a security threat to facility protection has been initiated. No releases of radioactive material requiring offsite response or monitoring are expected unless further degradation of safety systems occurs.

Alert – Events are in progress or have occurred which involve an actual or potential substantial degradation of the level of safety of the plant or a security event that involves probable life threatening risk to site personnel or damage to site equipment because of HOSTILE ACTION. Any releases are expected to be limited to small fractions of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) protective action guides (PAGs)

Site Area Emergency (SAE) – Events are in progress or have occurred which involve actual or likely major failures of plant functions needed for protection of the public or hostile action that results in intentional damage or malicious acts; 1) toward site personnel or equipment that could lead to the likely failure of or; 2) that prevent effective access to, equipment needed for the protection of the public. Any releases are not expected to result in exposure levels which exceed EPA PAG exposure levels beyond the site boundary.

General Emergency – Events are in progress or have occurred which involve actual or imminent substantial core degradation or melting with potential for loss of containment integrity or hostile action that results in an actual loss of physical control of the facility. Releases can be reasonably expected to exceed EPA PAG exposure levels offsite for more than the immediate site area.
https://www.nrc.gov/about-nrc/emerg-preparedness/about-emerg-preparedness/emerg-classification.html

The IAEA uses a separate scale to classify them, using the INES scale (0 to 7).


Chernobyl and Fukushima are the only 7s. Kyshtym was a 6, TMI and Windscale were 5s, SL-1 was a 4, and so on.

This was reportedly someone at the PEOC pushing the wrong button, so none of the above applies.
 
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