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I am not sure if this has been discussed before but I couldn't find a thread, so I am making one.

An important item that is overlooked by many who expect to be very involved physically in their own survival (outdoor work, E&E, combat, wilderness travel, hunting in all sorts of weather conditions, etc.) is eye protection. I've known for some time that a pair of goggles could be worth their weight in gold when the condition require them, but I thought I could get away with a cheap pair.

Yesterday, I was out deer hunting and the weather changed fairly quickly. It was late to begin with (about half hour before sunset) and all of a sudden, the light snow that fell all day turned into a white out with high winds. The visibility dropped from "fair" to "almost zero" and that was in part due to the fact that I couldn't keep my eyes open in the face of the wind and snow.

I put on my cheap goggles and for a little bit things seemed ok, but then the goggles fogged up and got condensation on the inside. They also didn't fit very well and were hurting the bridge of my nose. Frustrated, I hiked back to my truck and packed it in. This morning, I ordered myself a new pair of goggles. They were a bit of money but I hear they are the best or very close to it.

I got the Desert Locust-Deluxe Kit from Revision Military Eyewear. The difference between the Military Kit (a.k.a the Essential Kit) and the Deluxe Kit is the extra, amber colored lens you get besides the clear and the smoke ones. It is for use in low light conditions.

Check out this video of the revision lenses being "shotgun tested" by the military.

In clear conditions anyone can work, walk, fight, etc. but in inclement weather, one of the most basic requirements for carrying on whatever you are doing is to be able to see. You see what I'm saying?
 

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Been thinking about this lately. The idea of getting an eye injury and not having a doctor is worse then most things I can imagine. I stock up on safety glasses/goggles and plan to use them.
 

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I travel light
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Excellent thread

This is an excelent thread. A friend of mine cutting some plants for making them stylish, got a stick in his eye. He was almost two months with bandages and without TV, absolute resting, at home. Imagine this without proper medical help on time. Without antibiotics. This could origine an infection that easily can get you killed. I walk in the jungle with googles since then. There are bees as well (I don´t know if in NorthAmerica but here definitely exist) that when feel attacked (even if you don´t do nothing) look for screwing your eyes, I´ve seen them. Another good reason for wearing good quality lenses...I always use safety policarbonate industrial grade dark sunglasses, they´re cheap, affordable, and light & comfortable as are designed to be used the entire day, as the work boots. I´d suggest to add some to your Backpack, does not harm and could be very very useful.
 

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One of the other reason's for a good pair of saftey glasses is if there is a pandemic going around. You don't want someone coughing on you and spreading germs.
 

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Had I not been wearing glasses I would have likely done serious damage to my eyes twice. Once I was in the middle of a handgun competition and my Glock blew up. One of the pieces took a heck of a chunk out of my glasses. Then just a few weeks ago I was driving down a road in Lancaster PA with my window open and a small piece of stone came in the widow and bounced off my Oakley's. Left a little chip.

I have been wearing glasses since I was about four and am very protective over my eyes since you only get issued one set:) I usually wear goggles when on the range or doing any force on force training.

Great thread. Eye, hand and foot protection is too ofter overlooked.
 

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Enjoying Life
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Having worn glasses for the last 30yrs. I can not stress the importance of eye protection. I to have had my encounters with flying objects and if not for the glasses I might be a pirate. A good set of goggles or sunglasses worn most of the time is well worth the money.
 

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Been thinking about this lately. The idea of getting an eye injury and not having a doctor is worse then most things I can imagine. I stock up on safety glasses/goggles and plan to use them.
Close calls can wake one up. It didn't involve my eyes but I was using a table saw and needed to cut a groove in a small piece of pointed wood, a wedge about three inches long, two inches wide tapering to a point. I was using pushes and the like when the blade grabbed the piece and flung it right below my rib cage. Fortunately the piece landed bottom flat giving me a black and blue triangle for three weeks. If it had rotated I would have been impaled in the stomach. As it was, when I first looked down I totally expected to see blood and guts.

So yes, goggles and all the safety gear. There are times not to be macho.
 

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On some site, some guy bragged that he wore safety glasses in the woods and he could run through brush face first and not hurt his eyes. What about the rest of his face?? A big branch sticking into your cheek hurts like heck, not to mention hitting your teeth and gums. I guess he could run with a pencil in his hand too?
 

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Great thread. Courtesy of my bro-in-law, who builds under-city tunnels, I have good quality safety glasses laid on, similar to the soldier above. Can't have enough pairs I reckon. Two in car, several in the heavy vehicle, two in my pack.... As Tackleberry was saying, I cannot imagine a more dangerous and debilitating injury - and one harder to self-fix.
 

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I completely agree with everything said so far and more. Goggles are a top item in my BoB. Another aspect people don't think of too often for SHTF or what have you is UV protection. If there is any sort of nuke flinging, the ozone layer will most certainly be destroyed, or at least heavily damaged in the process. A huge increase in cataracts, skin cancer, etc. would follow. that huge stockpile of weapons will not be any good if you're blind.

It is important to note that the body has no way of detecting damage being done to the eyes via UV radiation, so better safe than sorry. Another factoid is that UV radiation also degrades polymers and plastics.

quoted from wikipedia.org:
Although the concentration of the ozone in the ozone layer is very small, it is vitally important to life because it absorbs biologically harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation emitted from the Sun. UV radiation is divided into three categories, based on its wavelength; these are referred to as UV-A (400-315 nm), UV-B (315-280 nm), and UV-C (280-100 nm). UV-C, which would be very harmful to humans, is entirely screened out by ozone at around 35 km altitude. UV-B radiation can be harmful to the skin and is the main cause of sunburn; excessive exposure can also cause genetic damage, resulting in problems such as skin cancer. The ozone layer is very effective at screening out UV-B; for radiation with a wavelength of 290 nm, the intensity at Earth's surface is 350 billion times weaker than at the top of the atmosphere. Nevertheless, some UV-B reaches the surface. Most UV-A reaches the surface; this radiation is significantly less harmful, although it can potentially cause genetic damage.
 

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cute is not always enough
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absolutely! got to protect the peepers!

I have sun glasses and clear safety glasses on the shelf by the door. I do not go out without taking something to cover my eyes.
 

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This is an excelent thread. A friend of mine cutting some plants for making them stylish, got a stick in his eye. He was almost two months with bandages and without TV, absolute resting, at home. Imagine this without proper medical help on time. Without antibiotics. This could origine an infection that easily can get you killed. I walk in the jungle with googles since then. There are bees as well (I don´t know if in NorthAmerica but here definitely exist) that when feel attacked (even if you don´t do nothing) look for screwing your eyes, I´ve seen them. Another good reason for wearing good quality lenses...I always use safety policarbonate industrial grade dark sunglasses, they´re cheap, affordable, and light & comfortable as are designed to be used the entire day, as the work boots. I´d suggest to add some to your Backpack, does not harm and could be very very useful.
Declan does post some very good threads, indeed.
 

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Hi all,

Excellent suggestion Declan! This is something I have thought about for years. The reason being, once suffered an Eye injury that was not appearent for hours later. I was stupid. I was drilling into sheet metal and a speck of rust flew into my Eye ball. It took hours until it began to affect my eye. Dear God, even thinking about this incident and typing this reply is NOW making my Eyes water! Arrrrrr. Mind you, this happened some twenty or more years ago. Even a simple walk in the Woods and a "pushed branch" could SNAP back and catch you in the face. I'm thinking a nice pair of SKI googles would be a must.

Regards,
KAOS THE CAT
 

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I have a good pair of wraparound polycarbonate shooting glasses affixed to my vest, a pair in my shooting bag, and another pair in the car.

I have ear protection and gloves with each pair of glasses, as well.

I have both pairs of BCG from boot in my pack, as well (just in case).

I need my eyes, and unfortunately I have not so good eyesight (-2.75). In any long term scenario I would have to safeguard not only my eyes physically, but the ability to see clearly. I need to invest into some brainstraps to make sure I don't lose them when it comes down to it, though. I suppose paracord would work....
 
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