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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay, this is a weakness of mine... I love these.

I have an old bag of Giant Marshmallows that expired almost a year ago. They are still soft and puffy, and I can smell them right through the bag. Mmmm. They look white, no yellowing like another brand stored with this bag, not sticky like the other one, they still have dry slightly powdery outsides. The ingredients are corn syrup, sugar, dextrose, modified cornstarch, water, gelatin, natural and artificial flavor, tetrasodium pyrophosphate.

The only strange thing is, the bag is tightly puffed up and swollen with air, and the other brand's stored bag was shrunken and stuck to the marshmallows. This bag is like a balloon, no air leaking out, but I can smell them through it. And I want to eat one.

Do you think it will make me sick?
 

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Expired. Expired by who's standards? the marketing department who don't want you to eat them, they want you to buy more? Obviously they aren't expired by all the signs one would use if there wasn't a date stamped on them.

Nothing in there to make you sick, just gelatin and sugar (and a couple of things to make them not stick together). I'd eat them.
 

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The ingredients are corn syrup, sugar, dextrose, modified cornstarch, water, gelatin, natural and artificial flavor, tetrasodium pyrophosphate.
In my book, bagged marshmallows are never good. I have had real ones made from scratch, and I could understand the appeal when I tasted those. But I used to trade all the circus peanuts and Peeps to my brothers for better-tasting stuff at Halloween and Easter, and I have never been able to gag down ambrosia "salad" or those sickly-sweet sweet potatoes buried under a marshmallow crust.

That said, though, what makes you think those marshmallows aren't as good as they ever were, other than maybe somewhat dried out? What on that list, set on an open shelf and ignored for years, would go bad? Corn syrup? Sugar? Dextrose sugar? Modified cornstarch (or any cornstarch)? Gelatin? Chemical flavoring? Tetrasodium pyrophosphate preservative? Which of those things have not been lost in back of pantry shelves for years and then been used safely when found?

If you actually want to eat one, eat one. (Better you than me.)

If they're over the hill, make some fresh. In fact, make some fresh anyway. Discover real, non-industrial marshmallows.

(Lyle's golden syrup or Steen's cane syrup can be substituted for corn syrup in these recipes. Or use maple syrup to give them a flavor worth eating. People were making marshmallow long before corn syrup was invented.)

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ina-garten/homemade-marshmallows-recipe.html

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/homemade-marshmallows-recipe.html

And a recipe using egg whites added to the classic recipe:
http://www.davidlebovitz.com/marshmallow-recipe-candymaking/

There. Now you can have limitless quantities of marshmallows out of storage food. Just store plain gelatin powder (which you should anyway, because you can make any flavor gelatin dessert or aspic with that and real fruit or vegetables as well as making marshmallows), some kind of syrup, granulated sugar, cornstarch, vanilla, and salt. Powdered egg whites if you like them made with egg whites (which unlike yolks, don't develop oxycholesterol when powdered). Maybe powdered sugar if you prefer to coat them with that rather than plain cornstarch. Bet you store most of that already.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Lol. Thanks to all for the replies.

They sat there smelling so good (I know it's Frankenfood but -sigh- mmmm) so I decided to open the bag and just see if the inner air smelled any different... it smells even better, so I decided to just take an experimental test bite... then I ate the whole thing.

It was delicious. No bellyache yet, I feel fine.
They're fine. I got them at Aldi a couple of years ago. So with marshmallows at least, I will ignore the expiration date and go by the look, smell, taste test, if they ever last that long again.
 

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Especially thanks NY Min, for the encouragement to make real ones. I want to learn how. Just need to get a round tuit ��
They are the simplest, simplest sweet/candy-like thing you can make. Unlike many candies, they are unfussy about what syrup goes into them. And you don't need a candy thermometer if you don't have one. I made fudge and other candies for years before I had a candy thermometer, starting when I was about 9, when I took over all the cookie and candy-making for the family.

(My mother didn't like to bake or candy make. My father did, but rarely had the time. And he lived for fudge and cookies. So he taught me to bake and make candy. Problem solved. Except when my big brother thought it was cute to shoot pinto beans into the cookies on the pan from his sling shot, and I cracked him over the head with the rolling pin, necessitating a trip down the street to our GP for stitches. I just went back to baking the rest of the cookies. I had told him I was going to do that if he didn't stop. My Dad nicknamed me rattlesnake before I was 5 because I never beat up my brothers without warning them first. When my brother got back home with his bandage, all Dad did was look at him and ask "Did your little sister tell you to stop shooting beans at her cookies? Um, yeah. Did she tell you what she was going to do to you if you didn't? Y-e-e-s. Has she ever not done to you what she told you she was going to do if you didn't stop teasing her? N-o-o-o. So when are you going to learn to listen, stupid?")

Anyway, to work without a thermometer, all you need is a cup of cold water and a spoon. A temp of 240 F is just a definite soft ball starting to firm You start dropping tiny bits of syrup into the cold water and then pick them up between your thumb and forefinger. When you can ball it up in a soft lump, it's soft ball. When you get firm lump that will only flatten when squeezed, it firm ball, and so on through hard ball, soft crack, and hard crack. (And beyond those to caramel and eventually burnt sugar if that's what you want.) People made candy for ages before there were candy thermometers. A candy thermometer is nice, but totally not essential.

https://www.exploratorium.edu/cooking/candy/sugar-stages.html

Confectionary making is a great deal of fun, and cool weather is the best for it.
Here's your Round Tuit. Go for it. :)


If you make a batch of soft marshmallow with egg whites, you have marshmallow fluff, the stuff to make marshmallow fluff fudge and fluffernutter sandwiches.

http://www.thekitchn.com/recipe-homemade-marshmallow-fluff-222088

And from Martha Stewart's recipe site, another fluff recipe plus a fudge recipe using that fluff:

http://www.marthastewart.com/255394/momma-reiners-homemade-marshmallow-cream

http://www.marthastewart.com/255395/momma-reiners-chocolate-fudge
 

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Okay, this is a weakness of mine... I love these.

I have an old bag of Giant Marshmallows that expired almost a year ago. They are still soft and puffy, and I can smell them right through the bag. Mmmm. They look white, no yellowing like another brand stored with this bag, not sticky like the other one, they still have dry slightly powdery outsides. The ingredients are corn syrup, sugar, dextrose, modified cornstarch, water, gelatin, natural and artificial flavor, tetrasodium pyrophosphate.

The only strange thing is, the bag is tightly puffed up and swollen with air, and the other brand's stored bag was shrunken and stuck to the marshmallows. This bag is like a balloon, no air leaking out, but I can smell them through it. And I want to eat one.

Do you think it will make me sick?
yea,,, Go ahead..make my day.

what some people will post.. how much can a bag cost??
 

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yea,,, Go ahead..make my day.

what some people will post.. how much can a bag cost??
You've never had the real thing fresh-made have you?

It has very little to do with the cost in this case, although they will cost you less than the bags.

Some of us like to make many things because we can make them better than we can buy them, plus we can have them whenever we want them without having to go to a store first.

ETA: Sorry skeepers, I thought you were objecting to the idea of making them from a recipe, not greencandy eating the old ones she found. As to that, why throw them out if they're still good? Even just a penny here, a penny there, it all adds up over time.
"Use it up, wear it out, make it do, or do without." My gran's favorite remark to all of us all the time. The older I get, the more I turn into my grandmother and great-grandmother and great-aunt and really understand where they were coming from back then.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
yea,,, Go ahead..make my day.

what some people will post.. how much can a bag cost??
LOL. I was putting up rice and moving old stores around, and lurking here at the same time, when I found the marshmallows. They smelled so good and I didn't want to go to the store and spend money on something so silly. And look what a wonderful thing I got out of the whole adventure, I got a round tuit...! Now I can try making real ones ;)
 

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Now I can try making real ones ;)
Here's a bonus recipe for when you make the marshmallow fluff marshmallow.
This was an immensely popular recipe back in the 1950s. For one thing, it was safer for kids to make themselves than the usual all-sugar syrup boiled to soft ball stage fudge recipe. It showed up with Mrs. Everyone's name on it in all the church cookbooks. It showed up at all the bake sales and pot lucks and coffees. My secret with it was that I made my own fluff. Everyone thought I had some magic mixing trick. Nope, just the oldest trick in the world--use better ingredients. I got sick of eating the stuff, though. I got sick of making the stuff. However, it's a nice fudge if you don't OD on it and an easy recipe, and I made it as my summer fudge for many years because classic fudge can refuse to "fudge" well in hot, and especially in humid, weather. You can make it with powdered-milk-and-tinned-butter evaporated milk, more tinned butter (not margarine), a nice raw sugar, and homemade marshmallow fluff. It will still be a total sugar rush, but not otherwise "junk food."

Never-Fail, Fantasy, Marshmallow Creme, or Mrs. Whoever Plagiariazed-the-recipe's Fudge

3 cups sugar (light brown muscovado will make it better)
3/4 cup butter (or margarine in the original--yuk. Now you know it was the 1950s)
1 small can (5 oz.) Carnation evaporated milk (about 2/3 cup) (Do not use sweetened condensed milk.)
3 pkg. (4 oz. each) Baker's Semi-Sweet Chocolate, chopped
(1 preferred and still prefer to use bittersweet, but I'm a dark-chocoholic)
1 jar (7 oz.) JET-PUFFED Marshmallow Creme
(Obviously, substitute homemade here)
1 cup chopped PLANTERS Walnuts
(I often made it with the pecans grown at the farm down the road. Any nut you like will do here. Or dried cherries. Or coconut. Or what you will.)
1 tsp. vanilla

Line 9-inch square pan with Reynolds Wrap® Aluminum Foil, with ends of foil extending over sides. (You can just grease the pan, but saying that doesn't sell aluminum foil, does it?) Bring sugar, butter and evaporated milk to full rolling boil in 3-qt. heavy saucepan on medium heat, stirring constantly. Cook 5 min. (or until candy thermometer reaches 234°F, but few people used a candy thermometer with this), stirring constantly. Remove from heat.
Add chocolate and marshmallow creme; stir until melted. Add nuts and vanilla; mix well.
Pour into prepared pan; spread to cover bottom of pan. Cool completely. Use foil handles to lift fudge from pan before cutting into 1-inch squares (Or just cut it into squares in the pan and then totally mash up the first piece wiggling it out so you have to eat it yourself. Then you can use a long flat spatula or old-style wide-blade dinner knife to remove the rest. That was obviously my much-preferred method of attack at about age 10, lol).

You can make this mocha fudge by putting instant coffee in the evaporated milk and using milk chocolate. You can make it as caramel/butterscotch fudge by using butterscotch chips. Use white chocolate and coconut cream instead of evaporated milk and coconut flakes for coconut fudge. There was a version with peanut butter. I think someone made every possible variation on the theme eventually. Mostly, they all worked, It's a hard recipe to flub.

Classic 1950s Woman's Day/Family Circle recipe, touting 5 brand-name food industry products. But I give it to you as twas guv to me, as the old ladies used to say when passing on family "receipts." :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
ok ive never admitted this before but i LOVE when the peeps are are a year or two old. ive never gotten sick and as they begin to loose moisture, they get a little more crunchy.

have at it!
There is nothing wrong with that! I keep peeps too. I have a box of what might be the oldest peeps in the world, and the texture is very interesting when they are truly fossilized.

I'm not scared of most old "expired" foods if they are preserved correctly, or like 99% sugar. With the marshmallows it was just that, the bag being all puffed up tight like a balloon, that was weird. I briefly wondered if it could be caused by a toxic reaction, lol.
 

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That sounds so good and easy, too!
That's why it took over the world. It was easy, and it was foolproof.

In the 1920s everyone could and did make classic fudge. According to my father, when my mother got married, she could make only 3 things, tea, toasted-cheese sandwiches, and fudge. It was more or less true. She lived at home until she got married with a grandmother, a mother, and a maiden aunt who all always chased her out of the already overcrowded kitchen. He must have been deluded by the fudge and proposed.

By the 1950s, almost no one made homemade fudge or taffy or brittle or any of the other popular homemade 1910s and 20s candies. The very thought intimidated most people. There was no spare sugar during the war years, so girls didn't make candy and therefore didn't learn to. And it's true there is some skill and knowledge required to make sugar-syrup candies well. Then the home economist working for the company that first sold jars of marshmallow fluff came up with this recipe to use it in. Fluff suddenly sold like hotcakes, and everyone was making fudge, or at least the fluff-based facsimile. It was pure marketing genius.
 

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I love the mocha fudge idea.
Here are a couple of variations the Fluff people are still pushing on their recipe page, including the peanut butter one I vaguely remembered. My Dad liked the peanut butter fudge from our homemade just-ground-roasted-peanuts peanut butter, but don't think I've made it since I left home at 18. Dad was a Virginia boy, and he liked his peanuts--peanut brittle, peanut fudge, just give him peanuts. That recipe is bringing back good memories. :)

https://www.marshmallowfluff.com/category/fabulous-fudges/

Looks like they've even come up with a microwave version now, LOL

Just a note on the different recipes:
Marshmallows are made with gelatin. Some recipes use beaten egg whites as well, but many don't.
Marshmallow fluff, however, is always made with beaten egg whites, and never uses gelatin.

So follow one of the 3 marshmallow recipes I posted if you want edible marshmallow cubes, but the last marshmallow recipe I posted, which is for homemade marshmallow fluff, if you want to make the fudges made with fluff.

One last note. Fudge is candy. Made with good ingredients in this case, but still candy. If you cut the fluff fudge into 1-inch squares, then 3 squares contains every bit of sugar an adult woman should eat in a day. (For a guy, it's 4 squares.) So put 2 squares on a plate next to your coffee cup, close the tin, and put it away. Savor your treats. And then have just a nice simple bowl of fruit for dessert with dinner that day.
 
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