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Green Eggs and Spam
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I did a Google for a more complex question I have with batteries, and I came across a pretty good link with battery information.

I hereby present this information to the masses here for education, enlightenment, and the possibility of obtaining a home-status of an always fully charged number of cells such that any favorite source of illumination will not fail due to lack of insufficient battery power.

May all your flashlight batteries be fully charged when TSHTF.
 

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Thanks dude.

One pointer- they have lithium in the 'bad' section and I swear by them. Energiser Ultimate lithium may be expensive, but they have long shelf life and are good in high drain apps. They are not rechargeable, however. I think they are good for stockpiling. Asides from that, Sanyo Eneloop are great for rechargeables.
 

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Live Secret, Live Happy
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I did a Google for a more complex question I have with batteries, and I came across a pretty good link with battery information.

I hereby present this information to the masses here for education, enlightenment, and the possibility of obtaining a home-status of an always fully charged number of cells such that any favorite source of illumination will not fail due to lack of insufficient battery power.

May all your flashlight batteries be fully charged when TSHTF.
I'm sure the author has a usage in mind, but frankly I can not figure out what that is.

In nearly ever use I have for a battery, he is dead wrong.
Not even freaking close when it comes to cordless power tools.
Dummer than a wet rope when it comes to rechargeable electronics, radios, and flashlights.

What kind of brainiac tells folks not to store alkaline batteries in a frig. Don't you want to slow down self discharge by 1600%.

I recommend that you ignore this dim wit's advise.
 

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I'm sure the author has a usage in mind, but frankly I can not figure out what that is.

In nearly ever use I have for a battery, he is dead wrong.
Not even freaking close when it comes to cordless power tools.
Dummer than a wet rope when it comes to rechargeable electronics, radios, and flashlights.

What kind of brainiac tells folks not to store alkaline batteries in a frig. Don't you want to slow down self discharge by 1600%.

I recommend that you ignore this dim wit's advise.
HI, with respect for your good information, isn't there a way to make your useful contribution without calling names?
 

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Green Eggs and Spam
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5,071 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
...

In nearly ever use I have for a battery, he is dead wrong...

What kind of brainiac tells folks not to store alkaline batteries in a frig. Don't you want to slow down self discharge by 1600%....
I've always stored batteries in the fridge ... easy place to find them!

However, I have NEVER seen a study that says you get a 1600% increase in battery life.

In fact, on the shelf at the store, the usable life span listed printed on the package is quite good, a number of years, for a quality alkaline.

What was it about cordless tool batteries did you not like?
 

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Live Secret, Live Happy
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I've always stored batteries in the fridge ... easy place to find them!

However, I have NEVER seen a study that says you get a 1600% increase in battery life.

In fact, on the shelf at the store, the usable life span listed printed on the package is quite good, a number of years, for a quality alkaline.

What was it about cordless tool batteries did you not like?
The rate of a chemical reaction increases by 2x for every 10C above the minimum activation energy for that reaction. That's just a basic part of chemistry. Insert the free energy equation if you remember it.

For an aqueous electrolyte, like the one used in a alkaline battery, this minimum point is just below the freezing point of water. This means the rate of self discharge would increase by 16x if you stored it in my 40C automobile instead of a zero c frig.

The author suggested that rechargeable tool battery technology was all going to NiMH. I don't see that at all. Heavy current usage remains NiCd. The future for heavy current use is LiFePO4. Especially those built by A123 and especially prismatics.

Rechargeable batteries are also used in a lot of Low current applications. Things like cell phones, radios, laptops. I believe these will continue to use Li polymer.

I run across people all the time who want to talk like engineers, but who have neither the education or the experience. This kinda ****es me off. Reading a book or a web site does not make you a rocket scientist.

You see, I've spent a great deal of the last 10 years teaching graduate engineers to be rocket scientists.
 

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IIRC primary lithium batteries (Li-FeS2) are not toxic, just expensive.

But they're fairly reasonable in quantity off ebay as an alternative to alkaline batteries (the latter always seem to leak in my critical devices, at least in AA/AAA sizes)

Others still swear by NiCad primarily because they can take much more abuse (vs. NiMH) and still function.

And if you want the most consistent AAA/AA NiMH low-self discharge, go with eneloops, nothing else.

Also, try to standardize your applications - I store AA & D and use battery size adapters for C and 6V applications.

(I buy alkaline industrial D cells because there's no reasonably priced lithium alternative)
 

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Green Eggs and Spam
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
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What kind of brainiac tells folks not to store alkaline batteries in a frig. Don't you want to slow down self discharge by 1600%...
I guess you can blame the Energizer Bunny.

Straight from the Pink Bunny Himself

I have never seen a study that proved any significant gain by storing modern batteries in the refrigerator. However, take note that both author of the link and you, did mention that self-discharge is negatively influenced by heat.

I noticed that the web page was dated 2009, so it is obviously not 100% up to date. However, I never saw any blatant error in the data presented.
 

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Live Secret, Live Happy
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I guess you can blame the Energizer Bunny.

Straight from the Pink Bunny Himself

I have never seen a study that proved any significant gain by storing modern batteries in the refrigerator. However, take note that both author of the link and you, did mention that self-discharge is negatively influenced by heat.

I noticed that the web page was dated 2009, so it is obviously not 100% up to date. However, I never saw any blatant error in the data presented.
Perhaps it is because I live in the Mojave desert and our shade temps often reach 115F and the interior of our cars is much hotter. The batteries in the flashlight stored in my jeep self discharge and start leaking in one year at these temps.
 

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Green Eggs and Spam
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Perhaps it is because I live in the Mojave desert...
When I lived in the High Desert I worked nights. I used my 3-D Cell Maglight all the time; the batteries never had a chance to "self" discharge... I personally killed them myself regularly!

Thanks for the feedback.
 
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