Survivalist Forum banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Live Secret, Live Happy
Joined
·
15,804 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
In todays world, I think nothing of firing up my tractors, pickups, or my ATV to fetch and carry heavy and bulky items. But if some thing damages the electric grid, and we loose power and our ability to refine and transport gasoline and diesel, I will be rationing my remaining fuel.

I use a variety of hand carts and wagons around my place today. Some are better suited for hauling stuff around the rough ground and steep terrain. I imagine some members would use a cart like these for bugging out. Hauling their grub stake and camping gear. I use them today for hauling compost, mulch, soil, or firewood. Or Transporting the fruit, grains, nuts, and squash that I harvest in the garden.

Here are three carts and wagons I recommend.

Vermont Garden Cart,
I bought my Vermont cart in 1986 and it has sat outside every winter since. I have patched the tubes and replaced the tires many times, and rebuilt the plywood box twice. It waa designed as a three sided box, but adding a fouth side, is not difficult. It has 26" bike tires, giving it sufficient ground clearance, and decent flotaion on soft ground. The manufacturer suggests a 400 lb max capacity, which I believe is generous. Plan to limit your load to your body wt.

Gorilla Dump Wagon,
I probably wont bother to repair my Vermont cart, because I bought one of these. It has a 32" x 46" polly tub bed which dumps, and the tow bar can be hitched to the ATV or towed by hand. It has the same ground clearance as my Vermont cart, but it has four, wider tires so it handles better on soft ground. The manufacturer lists it as 10 cu ft/1,500 lb max capacity, which is crazy unless you have it hitched to the tractor. Filled with grain or potatoes it would hold about 500 lbs.

Deer/Game Cart,
This is a far more specialized cart and not well suited for carrying soft, loose material. It handles well on rough terrain, especially since it has a second handle allowing a person on each end of it. I have used mine for relatively light loads (200ish lbs), but two guys could move more if necessary. I would not try towing a game cart with a bike or ATV.
 

Attachments

·
Retired *****
Joined
·
18,332 Posts
In today's world, I think nothing of firing up my tractors, pickups, or my ATV to fetch and carry heavy and bulky items. But if some thing damages the electric grid, and we loose power and our ability to refine and transport gasoline and diesel, I will be rationing my remaining fuel.
Now that we are in the dead of winter at my location, gasoline to power the snow blower is very important. I have almost 4 feet of snow on the deck of my pop-up trailer. It hasn't melted or compacted much since it's in the shade of a large spruce tree.

Without my snowblower I would be unable to leave the house except via snowshoes. I could manually shovel the long drive but being old and tired that would be very difficult.

The 4wd truck is completely buried. I could shovel that out as well but I'd have to assume the snowplows did the roads.

Winter in snow country is no time to be without fuels whether gasoline, natural gas or propane.

Many people in my area own horses. I doubt any have horse drawn sleighs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,547 Posts
Gorilla Dump Wagon,
I probably wont bother to repair my Vermont cart, because I bought one of these. It has a 32" x 46" polly tub bed which dumps, and the tow bar can be hitched to the ATV or towed by hand. It has the same ground clearance as my Vermont cart, but it has four, wider tires so it handles better on soft ground. The manufacturer suggests a 1200 lb max capacity, which is crazy unless you have it hitched to the tractor.
I have that exact some one in my garden. And yes, the weight rating is insane, its higher than most small SUV's.

None the less, it seems well made and is a handy tool.

We don't really use hand carts for much of anything in the west but I saw the everywhere in Sierra Leone. Many used a truck axle, complete with differential to haul very heavy loads, on hills, with a couple of people.





 

·
BASS
Joined
·
2,095 Posts
My son in Tennessee has a sled. It worked well going across a muddy harvested corn field with a doe in it.

I see one on the Bass Pro Shops site:

SHAPPELL JET SLED: Color Black. Shipped from manufacturer.

66"X44"X13" high $104.99

71"X44"x16" high. $134.99

He re-enforced the front to attach the tow rope. It was easily pulled by hand over the field and I think it would be much easier over snow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
284 Posts
I too, have a Gorilla Dump Wagon. I really hate pulling it long distances. Even though it does roll fairly easily even with a good sized load. If I was going to use if for any long distance (at least on foot) hauling, I would make a harness to pull it with.
 

·
Tested in the Wilderness
Joined
·
6,553 Posts
In todays world, I think nothing of firing up my tractors, pickups, or my ATV to fetch and carry heavy and bulky items. But if some thing damages the electric grid, and we loose power and our ability to refine and transport gasoline and diesel, I will be rationing my remaining fuel.
I also will ration fuel but I do have 20 gasoline containers 10 of them are 5 gallon gas cans. I plan to hopefully this next summer buy a gasoline tank to store at least 100 gallons of gasoline. I use gasoline for 2 generators, 4 chainsaws and the vehicle pictured below. I am trying more and more to go completely off grid even If there never is an EMP attack etc etc.

I do have a cart and an old big wheelbarrow, 2 bicycles and a 20 plus year old ATV and a diesel truck but this 1979 pickup truck was bought new by my Dad and I promised him I would never sell it. This is a 7 year old pic and I have this '79 pickup stored up on my mtn place now and I will never remove it except to drive around the 2 plus mile private dirt road. Especially use it now as a work vehicle pulling and hauling tree trunks, firewood etc. for myself and neighbors with cabins.

Maybe go to town someday especially post SHTF but I don't plan to buy plates, registration or anything for this old truck again. I have coasted down on a bicycle to the nearest town 12 miles down the mountain several times and If necessary I could coast down in this old pickup also.

It likely will outlast my other vehicles and maybe someday will be one of only a few vehicles still functioning if / when there is ever a grid down event...

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,417 Posts
I'm not sure if they are available for carts but there are solid tires made for wheel barrows. These tires are tough and last forever.

I used a wagon similar to the gorilla wagon on a construction job. The job site was on a island and no motor vehicles were allowed. That wagon was awesome for moving materials around on the complex.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,417 Posts
that's a awesome wheel barrow how ever you need to upgrade to the barrow with the double wheels. it's less tippy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,417 Posts
If you have a place in the country, even goats can pull small carts. So you could get a couple of goats or a horse, mule, or donkey. Draft animals, if you have a pasture, would be a good idea to have around. 1800's old school, but worked for centuries. Large dogs too, can pull carts or sleds. However, goats feed themselves.
 

·
Super Moderator
Trash Remover
Joined
·
3,929 Posts
I have the deer cart and a wagon, hope it doesn't come to that; would rather use the 2 4x4 vehicles LOL
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,656 Posts
I made a cart using an old wheel chair wheels.
large diameter wheels roll best over rough terrain and these are airless so I don't have to worry about flat tires.
electrical steel conduit and corners sold for flea market awnings.
The beauty of this is that it can at any time be reconfigured to fit any agenda at hand, taler longer shorter, or reconfigure the frame for a dwelling or bed frame or string a hammock and handle up to 300 lbs.
I have been using it as a work cart on my property hauling firewood and other materials and it performs just fine.
Because the frame is so easily reconfigured, it also can be broken down to fit in the trunk of a car. Several different means can be used to skin it such as a tarp, or cammo netting, or cargo netting, sheet metal, or wood slats.
One additional thing I will be adding is hand brakes for both ascending and descending hills, and locking the wheels. I have a friend's walker that have the brakes I will be copying for this application. The screws in the joints are slotted in such a way that the framework articulates in uneven ground.
 

·
BASS
Joined
·
2,095 Posts
I have the deer cart and a wagon, hope it doesn't come to that; would rather use the 2 4x4 vehicles LOL
The subject is no power and eventually no fuel for vehicles. I am sure you would save your the fuel for things you cannot haul by hand.

That is where I am considering a sled as my son has. It may not work well in dense under growth but over a muddy harvested corn field it worked well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,000 Posts
I’ve been thinking about one of those Gorilla Carts since seeing one at a condo we rented several years ago! It seems like a very useful tool to add to The Ragged Ass Ranch!

My garden cart works well for taking a picnic/hike with a couple small kids! Cooler and a dog bed thrown in gave little legs a rest when they needed and a good lunch during the trip! I bet the Gorilla Cart would work even better for this!

I bought a sled to tow behind my side by side two or three years ago and just like magic haven’t had a winter worth mentioning since!

I use Ultraseal https://gemplers.com/collections/al...ulletproof-grade-ultraseal-tire-sealant-1-gal in all my small tires around the farm! Doesn’t break down like Slime and doesn’t freeze.

Even with rocks, thorns and what have you a flat is very rare! I can’t remember one off hand, but just in case I’ll say rare!

Upgrading your wheelbarrow tires to trailer road tires really retards sun damage. I did the heaviest tire that size, but will more than likely step back to a lower capacity one next time as it’s way overkill!

SD
 

·
Tested in the Wilderness
Joined
·
6,553 Posts
I have the deer cart and a wagon, hope it doesn't come to that; would rather use the 2 4x4 vehicles LOL
I also hope it won't come to a complete total grid down event. I mean the electrical grid going down all over the USA. Since most people could not handle it as many could and did in the 1930's Great Depression. Although they still had some power but nothing like today's society's ridiculous dependence on electricity.

I would use my two pickup trucks as long as the fuel held out. And all I will go into about that.


The subject is no power and eventually no fuel for vehicles. I am sure you would save your the fuel for things you cannot haul by hand.

That is where I am considering a sled as my son has. It may not work well in dense under growth but over a muddy harvested corn field it worked well.
Glad you clarified the subject. I usually go by titles and post accordingly. The title of this thread: Equipment for Surviving a Grid Down Event, Hand Carts and Wagons

I did not think the equipment was limited to Only hand carts and wagons. To list all of the non-electric equipment I own and hope to buy more, then that would take a long list. I still have packed away many books etc. One is titled: non-electric catalog I have not seen that catalog for seems like twenty years. Here is what that catalog shows and where people can see and even order if they can afford it. I try to buy inexpensively but this shows a great deal of what people might need if / when there is ever a grid down event with No electricity. > https://www.lehmans.com/
 

·
Live Secret, Live Happy
Joined
·
15,804 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
I also hope it won't come to a complete total grid down event. I mean the electrical grid going down all over the USA. Since most people could not handle it as many could and did in the 1930's Great Depression. Although they still had some power but nothing like today's society's ridiculous dependence on electricity.

I would use my two pickup trucks as long as the fuel held out. And all I will go into about that.




Glad you clarified the subject. I usually go by titles and post accordingly. The title of this thread: Equipment for Surviving a Grid Down Event, Hand Carts and Wagons

I did not think the equipment was limited to Only hand carts and wagons. To list all of the non-electric equipment I own and hope to buy more, then that would take a long list. I still have packed away many books etc. One is titled: non-electric catalog I have not seen that catalog for seems like twenty years. Here is what that catalog shows and where people can see and even order if they can afford it. I try to buy inexpensively but this shows a great deal of what people might need if / when there is ever a grid down event with No electricity. > https://www.lehmans.com/
I am planning a series of threads describing equipment for surviving a grid down event.

Current threads under consideration are:
Solar Panels,
Farm and Garden Tools,
Fishing gear and Traps,
Transportation,
Long Term Camping Gear,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,000 Posts
I should ask if anyone has experience with both the 1,200 pound and the 1,500 pound models and what you thought of the slight difference in size/weight versus convenience day to day around the house?

The larger one with bigger tires should be awesome, but is it too big? Sometimes you get too much of a good thing!

SD
 

·
Live Secret, Live Happy
Joined
·
15,804 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
I should ask if anyone has experience with both the 1,200 pound and the 1,500 pound models and what you thought of the slight difference in size/weight versus convenience day to day around the house?

The larger one with bigger tires should be awesome, but is it too big? Sometimes you get too much of a good thing!

SD
Mostly, bigger is better.
But the 10 cuft version does not fit thru a 36" wide house door, if that matters to you.
It closly matches the wheel track width of my Honda Rancher, which I think is a good thing.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top