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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was going through our oft used staples that are air "tight" and gone through fairly fast. Usually within 6 months and up to a year. These are all stable ingredients that are meant for the short term but, are good to a year or much more as they are. I topped off the split peas and noticed something glaring...

Food Spice Ingredient Seasoning Wood


We know that oxygen is a prime enemy of dried food storage. It accelerates aging and the rancidity of fats. Nutrition degrades and it facilitates the breakdown of well, everything.
We also know that heat accelerates all breakdowns, structure, nutrition, texture and on and on.

It is also clear that light also has the same effect. We know this and yet, many fail to protect from all three at the same time. It is darn near impossible in actuality in our day to day goods.

This is about the light part...
It is true that light is not of major consequence when we are eating a balanced diet and can make up for any shortfalls elsewhere. But, it does degrade food, even in the short term part of the pantry.

Food Ingredient Cuisine Plant Food storage containers


I added split peas to this container about a month ago and put on top of split peas that are no older than 4 months. The change is obvious. Taste and texture are the same but, we all know that any vitamin that reacts to light is toast. This is from about 3 hours of sunlight a day in the Summer.

So, watch your food.
If you want to store it long term, do it right the first time. Because, even the short term ingredients are wrecked in short order due to one or all three of food storage enemies.
Yes, we are eating them. There is no reason not to. But, what if we were in a position to need those missing vitamins...?

Now, I have all these things, stored in bulk in mylar with O2 absorbers, stored @ 50 degrees F in the Summer and 45ish in Winter. I have this all covered but, I wanted to demonstrate a glaring difference between supermarket fresh and a few months that get sunlight.



Yours,
Shawn.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It’s funny you mentioned this cause when I saw this pic in the other thread I thought you had combined the plain brown lentils and put the green split peas on top! Wow what a difference in color.
Quite shocking really. Never paid much mind because we use a lot of them. Less in the Summer but, a bunch in the colder months.
And being on the counter, we didn't notice the change until we went to top ot off.
I read up on it and peas are really susceptible to bleaching. I think I will keep them in the dark pantry from now on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
99% of my stored food is in lock up metal cupboards or plastic trunks or drums/barrels that exclude almost all light.

Those same containers make the storage effectively vermin proofed and much more thermally stable.
Of course my storage food is packed away in a climate controlled, oxygen free, light proof environment. I mean zero light unless I am getting something or stocking something.
These are pantry staples that are used all the time. Not much different from getting a cup of flour or a glass of milk from the fridge. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Same here. Just salt, pepper, bacon grease.
We don't have the counter space to display common used items.
I live in a very small place but, there is quite a bit of room in the kitchen. All the storage places are full up.
Since this stuff is in constant rotation, I don't really see a need to store it away. Except a few seasonal item like split peas. Lol
I thought it cool and helpful to see light damage to foods. We cannot see rancidity from oxygen or nutrient degradation from storing in a hot environment.
But, we can sure see this. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Huh. I thought you just combined your yellow and green split peas. I mix mine up, depending on what needs to get used.
Nope. Lol.
So, I just did a careful flip. The peas on the bottom that were not exposed are green as can be.
Food Ingredient Food storage containers Recipe Fines herbes


And mixed up, you can barely tell.

Property Countertop Wood Fluid Interior design
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 · (Edited)
Yea I am the same way, there is no food on countertops at all, all of my foods like Grits, flour, rice, quinoa, oats, dried peas are all in either a turned off mini fridge or in those Huge Coffee cans. As I mentioned I live in Queens, NY and well, rodents can be an issue here, so anything that a rodent would want to eat are sealed away from both them, and the light of day.

With regard to bread, lol I have them hanging in thick plastic bags, from the ceiling in my kitchen using carabiners attached to a flower pot holding Hook



I do love what you have done there Shawn, I just don't have the counterspace to do that. My Counterspace is filled with a huge variety of small Appliances 360° around my kitchen.
Thankfully, most of our appliances fit on some shelves I put in. And others fit in cupboards that are not suitable for sound food storage. Like my 12 quart roaster is above my oven. Water bath canner, griddle, waffle iron and more are below.
Dehydrator, steamer, food saver are on shelves.
Air fryer, pressure canner and insta pot are in an under counter nook.

The only appliances we have out on the counter are the toaster, microwave, food processor and Kitchen Aid mixer. Oh, coffee pot and ice maker.
Large pestle and mortar, are also on a counter.

We have a fair amount of bare countertop for bread dough, pizza making etc.

I don't have a show kitchen... it has some clutter but, it is very functional. We use it for hours every day. It is a workshop filled with tools and raw materials.
There is space for guests but, it is not there to impress. It is there to transform our ingredients into delicious and nutritious food, with or without electricity or grid tied natural gas.

Anyway, there are dozens of base ingredients we prefer to have at the ready. The pantry portions of the kitchen are plum full with other things like spices. I would rather hide the crockpot than things we use much more often.
That said. I am also working on a my "pantry"
I will be posting about it soon. But, I am thinking of moving those canisters into there. If I can fit them in and make sense of it all.

Cheers!

Shawn.

P.S. I have a DeWalt flexvolt weedeater in one corner. Now that is an appliance. Hahaha.
(Wife won it and I have not put it away yet. Winter came before Fall cleanup was finished. 😞 )
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Example:
There are 70+ pounds of base carbs here. Some simple and some complex with a variety of nutritional needs met. And we have coffee to fill all of these cups. Come on over and we can chat. 😁
Oh, the vaults on the bottom have 75 pounds of sugar and ~60 pounds of flour.

Brown Shelf Wood Shelving Food storage containers

Shelf Wood Shelving Laundry room Gas


A couple dozen cookbooks and cooking magazines on the end.

Wood Flooring Wood stain Gas Hardwood
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
True to my word, I have moved the canisters to the pantry. It is a better environment and only slightly less convenient.
I now have 5 feet of unused counter. Hmmm.

Brown Shelf Shelving Wood Interior design
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
AHHH SHAWN I SEE YOUR GREAT MISTAKE IN PREPPING....




You Did not buy in Bulk TOBASCO sauce....

View attachment 481767

You have a great kitchen setup Shawn, and we here in Queens, NY are envious of your guys space and ability to store "Preps" where you all live, But there is NO Excuse not to have Tabasco Sauce, Hell, It was even inside the M.R.E.'s, yea very small bottle, but Tabasco .

I Hope you and your entire family have a wonderfully rememberable holiday ,season, um with hot sauce :)

God Bless
Ah, you are one of the ones that have not seen my pantry. Let me assure you young Jedi, there is Tabasco and pepper sauces of all types.
You would also find peppers to fit many cuisines from around the world as well. From chipotle to Thai chilis.
 

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Discussion Starter · #42 ·

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Discussion Starter · #48 ·
Re temperature: As a general rule the storage life of most foods is cut in half by every increase of 18º F (10º C). For example, if you've stored your food in a garage at 90º F (32º C) you should expect a shelf life of about half what could be obtained perhaps in your pantry at 70º F (21º C), which in turn is half the storage life that you could get if you kept it in your basement or refrigerator at 50º F (10º C).
Yep. And that is why all my long term preps are stored at 50 or under. I will get the max shelf life possible.
But, this thread is about light affecting day to day things we have in our kitchens. 😀
 
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Discussion Starter · #49 ·
NICE!

Great idea, this would also mean I get to buy more guns. 🤣
I'd love a .300 blackout with my subsonic oatmeal. :ROFLMAO:
 

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Discussion Starter · #59 ·
I do have a question though, why did you not rotate the peas? I guess working in the dietary profession, rotation is always a priority no matter what it is. We store noodles in 5-gallon buckets. When they get low, we order more. When the new come in, we dump the older in a bowl, wash the bucket then add the new and top off with the old.

They are in rotation. Two years left on just the BB date, which is arbitrary at best. I was just showing what a little extra light does to food. Nothing more and nothing less.

I rotate everything, including foods I put up for 25 year storage. I am anal about food storage. Ask around. 😂
 
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