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New York City, NY - Jason Green and Melissa Jackson, two New York City EMT’s on break at a coffee shop refused to help Eutisha Revee Rennix who was on the floor gasping for air and in pain. When coffee shop employees asked the EMT’s for assistance they said to “call it in”, meaning to call 911 because they were on their coffee break. Cynthia Rennix, the mother of Eutisha says “the felt their break was more important than saving a life”. Both Green and Jackson have been suspended by the New York Fire Department and the baby was premature and unable to be saved.


These folks need to not only be fired, but sued and criminally charged!
 

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ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒ&
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they arent legally bound, but they did take an oath.
If they were in an area that they provide 911 service to, then they had a duty to act. Failing to act puts them in a breech of duty and makes them negligent. They will loose their certifications, job and will be sued in civil court. However, that is the least of their worries. Since their negligence resulted in the death of two people, they can be prosecuted criminally and face substantial jail time.

Bastards. Coming out of NYC I am willing to bet that they are a union shop. Morally, they had every duty to act.
 

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all depends if they were on the clock or not
 
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All this fluff about being in their area or being on the clock, the fire chief of their precinct said it best; They took an oath to help anyone anytime and for that, they will be fired.

The Fire Department of New York suspended Jason Green, a six-year veteran, and Melissa Jackson, a four-year veteran, without pay while the Dec. 9 incident is investigated, spokesman Steve Ritea said.

Ritea said that all FDNY members "take an oath to assist others whenever they're in need of emergency medical care. It's their sworn duty."

A union spokesman said Monday that EMTs generally consider their jobs to be a 24-hour kind of thing.

"Our people tend to spring into action whether they're on duty, off duty, whatever they're doing," said Robert Ungar, spokesman for the Uniformed EMTS and Paramedics, FDNY.

Shop worker Tareen Brown, 29, said the EMTs initially told workers that "if they reacted, they could get in trouble. They said they weren't allowed to touch her unless a call was made to 911 first."

His co-worker, Lourdes Colon, 19, said, "They said they couldn't do anything. They said they were trainees. They showed no sympathy at all."

Brown said that after Jackson and Green did not go to help Rennix, he went outside where there was a group of about 10 FDNY employees, and told them, "Somebody has fallen out. There's an emergency."

"They said, 'What do you want us to do? Call 911.'

Read more: http://www.nypost.com/p/news/local/...man_emts_VmNy42fEfO3nD0qFw9jxNJ#ixzz0aWzn1ENx
 

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from criminal negligence stand point it does just like an off duty cop cant write you a ticket and it be enforcible and the question i have is why ddnt any one else try to help your so quick to condem the emts how about every one else that was there and did nothing and im pretty sure whatever was wrong with her was more than a emt can fix if she collapsed and then died
depending on there level of training they might have recognized that they werent qualified or able to treat and told then call 911 so someone more trained than them can come out that news story doesnt tell the whole story
like the cause of death for all we know she could have had a anurizm in the brain and just kicked the bucket we dont know
so i would recomend since wo dont have all the facts
judge not lest ye be judged for by that witch you judge others so shall ye be judged

there are 4 levels of emt certification
emt-b basic
emt1-85 intermediate
emt1-99 intermediate
emt-p paramedic

EMT-Basic is the entry level of EMS.[12] The procedures and skills allowed at this level are generally non-invasive such as bleeding control, positive pressure ventilation with a bag valve mask, supplemental oxygen administration, and splinting (including full spinal immobilization). Splinting a femur fracture may involve use of a traction splint, which will reduce the fracture. Some medications (for example, epinephrine for anaphylactic shock (severe allergic reaction) administered through an autoinjection device such as an EpiPen) can only be administered or "assisted" to a patient with a prior prescription. Training requirements and treatment protocols vary from area to area.[13][14]

[edit] Intermediate levels of EMT
EMT-Intermediates are the levels of training between basic (EMT-B) and paramedic (EMT-P). There are two intermediate levels that are tested for by the NREMT, the EMT-I/85 and the EMT-I/99, with the 1999 level being the more advanced of the two. The standard curriculum for EMT-I from 1998 is defined by the NHTSA, but each state may not have implemented or approved this program. Many states have stopped issuing new Intermediate licensure, instead focusing on maintaining the current lists of intermediates they have, and encouraging the Basic to Paramedic program philosophy. [15] Outside of the NHTSA framework, some states have instituted their own intermediate EMT levels using a variety of names (e.g. EMT-II (2) in California[16] or the levels of Advanced EMT-Intermediate and Advanced EMT-Critical Care in New York[17]).

[edit] EMT-I/85
EMT-I/85 is a level of training that will typically allow several more invasive procedures than are allowed at the basic level, including IV therapy, the use of multi-lumen airway devices (even endotracheal intubation in some states), and provides for enhanced assessment skills.

[edit] EMT-I/99
The EMT-I/99 represents a higher level than the EMT-I/85 with an expanded scope of practice, such as cardiac monitoring and the administration of additional pharmaceutical interventions, as well as additional training time.[18]

[edit] EMT-P
EMT-Paramedics, who are commonly referred to as simply "paramedics," represents the highest level of EMT, and in general, the highest level of prehospital medical provider, though some areas utilize physicians as providers on air ambulances or as a ground provider.[19] Paramedics perform a variety of medical procedures such as fluid resuscitation, pharmaceutical administration, obtaining IV access, cardiac monitoring (continuous and 12-lead), and other advanced procedures and assessments.[20]

[edit] Staffing levels
An ambulance with only EMT-Bs is considered a basic life support (BLS) unit, an ambulance utilizing EMT-Is is dubbed an intermediate life support (ILS) unit, and an ambulance with paramedics is dubbed an advanced life support (ALS) unit. Some states allow ambulance crews to contain a mix of crews levels (i.e. a basic and a paramedic or an intermediate and a paramedic) to staff ambulances and operate at the level of the highest trained provider. There is nothing stopping supplemental crew members to be of a certain certification, though (e.g. if an ALS ambulance is required to have two paramedics, then it is acceptable to have two paramedics and a basic).
 

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It is criminal,as ur certification maintains you have the obligation and duty to act.If nobody knew they were emt's it would have been different.Not to mention is a slap in the face to public trust.Years have been spent building public confidence in these professionsIs like a firefighter showin up at your christmas party and sayin oh im off duty sorry cant help you with that fire.
 

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FarmerJohn,

They were on duty-but on a break. In EMS one expects to have breaks and meals interrupted for emergency calls.

Even as basic EMTs, there was plenty that they could have done. The ABCs are the core to any EMS training. Airway, Breathing and Circulation. Even if CPR would not have saved the mother, the unborn child had a better than fair chance so long as the mother was oxygenated, ventilated and blood was being circulated.

These two are a disgrace to the profession and their inaction is inexcusable.

BTW--I am a 19 year veteran of EMS and have worked at all levels including administration.

These two jokers need to have the civil and criminal book thrown at them.
 

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FarmerJohn,

They were on duty-but on a break. In EMS one expects to have breaks and meals interrupted for emergency calls.

Even as basic EMTs, there was plenty that they could have done. The ABCs are the core to any EMS training. Airway, Breathing and Circulation. Even if CPR would not have saved the mother, the unborn child had a better than fair chance so long as the mother was oxygenated, ventilated and blood was being circulated.

These two are a disgrace to the profession and their inaction is inexcusable.

BTW--I am a 19 year veteran of EMS and have worked at all levels including administration.

These two jokers need to have the civil and criminal book thrown at them.

im just playing devils advocate here but i do think its sad they just watched
 
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It is criminal,as ur certification maintains you have the obligation and duty to act.If nobody knew they were emt's it would have been different.Not to mention is a slap in the face to public trust.Years have been spent building public confidence in these professionsIs like a firefighter showin up at your christmas party and sayin oh im off duty sorry cant help you with that fire.
As a former EMT I can tell you that not all states have the "duty to act" requirement. Where I lived there was none and we did not treat when off duty because the state also did NOT have a "good samaritan" statute to protect us.
 

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It doesn't have to be illegal to be immoral.
Immoral or not, let me give you an example why a Medic would be hesitant to help. Lets say the girl or child dies, not through negligence but something was wrong with the child or mother. Since i would not be on duty, my company would not cover me if I am taken to court. Also, since i was off duty, technically, my medical control may not apply since some say "while on duty" and that could mean I was practicing without med control, a big no no (they probably wouldn't do this, but it has happened before). So by trying to help off duty, I could be sued and loose my license. Luckily, in my area things aren't like that so one could help off duty and be okay. It is usually a area by area thing. Until things are changed so that first responders and ER's aren't sued at the drop of the hat by every two bit lawyer there is some uncertainty that goes with treating off duty.

Having said that, the fact they were on duty and refused is crazy and they should get in deep trouble. Let me also say though that not all EMT's take an oath (I never have) and the only time we do not have a requirement to help someone is if the scene is not safe for the EMT's. I highly doubt though that a coffee shop posed any danger to the EMT's. So they should get in trouble.
 
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