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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If anyone is looking for a nice little radio to put back with there emergency
supplies here's one to consider. I just got it and it does everything they say
it will. I played with the short wave side band or whatever it is and I got
a lot of people speaking in metric or something I can't understand



I got mine for $40 free shipping check it out
http://www.ebay.com/itm/D105X-Disco...288?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2ec5983938
 

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that's a rather good price. I've seen some similar to this one in prices ranging from $70 to $120. I've been wanting ones like these for a while they are just too expensive. I'll probably buy this one though.

You just got this one right? Give us an update in a couple weeks let us know if you still like it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
that's a rather good price. I've seen some similar to this one in prices ranging from $70 to $120. I've been wanting ones like these for a while they are just too expensive. I'll probably buy this one though.

You just got this one right? Give us an update in a couple weeks let us know if you still like it.
No can do,,I checked it out and it seems fine It's going to get wrapped
in foil and stuck the Faraday cage.
 

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Capability, not scenarios
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It's essentially a Kaito KA-500 radio, such as you might find here:

http://www.campingsurvival.com/kaitoradioka500.html

I have that one, it's pretty good. I also have the KA-600, the Voyager Pro, which is better enough than the KA-500 that if you have to buy only the one, get the Voyager Pro.

My KA-500 is wrapped in foil and in my Faraday Cage. I also bought extra batteries for each.
 

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Improvise Adapt Overcome!
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12,007 Posts
I want one that has AM/FM, Short wave and all the weather channels; that is the size of an Eton Scorpion, with crank and solar charging.
 

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I have had the Kaito Voyager Pro KA-600 for several weeks now.

9.5" x 5.5" x 2.5" approximate. It is all kind of rounded and hard to measure.

I have had four days on a full battery charge with the radio off, but the Weather Alert featured turned on. Had half a dozen warnings in that time.

One point. When the Alarm does go off, the radio comes on. It does not go back off until turned off. Same with the weekly test alarm. When the alarm sounds, the radio will stay on with the regular weather announcements, after the test is over.

I picked up an extra battery and the Kaito SW antenna. I have been able to get WWV on 5, 10, & 15MHz. I live in an apartment building facing the enclosed courtyard, so do not have much of a chance to get any SW, though I was picking up a few. I think that out in the open, it will be much more effective, especially with the long wire antenna.

Cranking is not too difficult, but it takes a while to get a full charge from half charge. Have not had a chance to try the solar charge function. The balcony faces north, so I get no direct sun.

All in all, I am extremely pleased with the radio. After a few more tests, I will pull the batteries and it will get the Faraday wrap treatment and be put in the metal file cabinet.

Shop around. But well worth the $80 I wound up paying for mine.

Just my opinion.
 

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Storyteller
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For a little bit more, the Sangean ATS 505 offer AM/FM/LW/SW with SSB.

Yes, SSB. This little brother to the full feature ATS909 is listed on many sites for about $105 -$120. Comes with a case and may be run from external power. (6VDC)

A commercial seller has this to say about the radio -

Coverage includes longwave from 153 - 279 kHz, AM from 520-1710, shortwave solid from 1711-29999 kHz and FM 87.5-108 MHz (stereo to earphone jack).

The backlit display can show either the frequency or the time (12 or 24 hour format). Tune via the manual tuning knob, Up-Down buttons, automatic tuning, keypad entry or from the 45 memories.

The memories are divided into 5 pages of 9 memories each. There is one page available for long wave, one for medium wave, one for FM and two for shortwave.

The ATS-505P even tunes Morse code and single sideband (SSB) using a separate Clarify knob on the side of the radio. Single Sideband allows for the reception of two-way communications such as amateur radio, military, maritime and international aeronautical traffic. You may press in the tuning knob to select between normal and fine tuning (1 or 10 kHz on AM/LW and 1 or 5 kHz on shortwave).

Not bad for just over a hundred dollar bill. Think of it as a tank of gas....

I've had the ATS909 for many, many years. Super radio, this little brother should give you years of trouble free service.

Still made in Taiwan.


If you feel you don't need SSB - the ATS 404 offers everything but SSB, the price point is ~$60.

I'm a real fan of the brand having had radios in daily use made by Sangean for decades - without an issue.
 

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Nemo May Impune Laccesit
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317 Posts
For a little bit more, the Sangean ATS 505 offer AM/FM/LW/SW with SSB.

Yes, SSB. This little brother to the full feature ATS909 is listed on many sites for about $105 -$120. Comes with a case and may be run from external power. (6VDC)
I've owned this model for about 3 years and can say nothing bad about it. Great reception and tone. A real bargain in my opinion.
 

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Pencil 5, AUTOCAD 0
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I have a Grundig S450DLX that was around $120 and can run off a 12v car
battery for days and days.... it does require 6 "D" batteries though, which
is mildly retarded these days. The radio itself is very good, and comes with
every conceivable antenna connection one could want, as well as audio outputs.
 

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Just wanted to pass this along.

SHTF Survivalist Radio Frequency List
=== BAND === | CHAN. | FREQUENCY MHZ| NOTES
============ | ===== | ============ | ==================
FRS -------- | === 3 | 462.6125 FM =| PREPPER FRS
GMRS ------- | == 20 | 462.675+ FM =| PL 141.3 REPEATER
MURS ------- | === 3 | 151.9400 FM =| PREPPER MURS
CB AM ------ | 3 AM= | 026.9850 AM =| PREPPER CB
CB AM ------ | 9 AM= | 027.0650 AM =| EMERGENCY CB
CB SSB ----- | 36USB | 027.3650 USB | SHTF SURVIVAL
CB SSB ----- | 37USB | 027.3750 USB | PREPPER CB SSB
CB FREEBAND- | 38GAP | 027.3780 USB | SHTF SURVIVAL
CB FREEBAND- | E 2HI | 027.4250 USB | SHTF SURVIVAL
LOWBAND VHF- | = LOW | 033.4000 FM =| SHTF SURVIVAL
LOWBAND VHF- | PKDOT | 042.9800 FM =| PREPPER LOW SIMPLEX
HAM VHF ---- | == 2M | 146.5200 FM =| HAM CALL SIMPLEX
HAM VHF ---- | == 2M | 146.5500 FM =| HAM PREPPER SIMPLEX
HAM VHF ---- | == 6M | 051.0000 FM =| HAM PREPPER SIMPLEX
HAM HF ----- | = 10M | 028.3050 USB | HAM PREPPER TECH
HAM HF ----- | = 20M | 014.2420 USB | HAM TAPRN
HAM HF ----- | = 40M | 007.2420 LSB | HAM TAPRN NET
HAM HF ----- | = 60M | 005.3570 USB | HAM SHTF NVIS
HAM HF ----- | = 80M | 003.8180 LSB | HAM TAPRN NET
LAND SAR VHF | SARFM | 155.1600 FM =| SEARCH & RESCUE
MARINE VHF - | == 16 | 156.8000 FM =| SAFETY CALLING
MARINE VHF - | == 72 | 156.6250 FM =| MARINE PREPPER
AIRCRAFT VHF | GUARD | 121.5000 AM =| EMERGENCY DISTRESS

*Compiled from various sources 1997-2013, updated mid-2013.
Entered in the public domain. Permission granted to reprint and copy this.


Background Notes and Histories on Frequencies of the Lists.

Low Band VHF Frequencies:

LOWBAND VHF | PKDOT | 042.9800 FM | PREPPER LOW SIMPLEX
42.98 MHz is an old Low Band VHF itinerant business channel with a 2 watt limit. It is the Pink Dot channel, for those who are familiar with the Blue Dot, Red Dot, Purple Dot, etc. and similar "Color Dot" series used by 2-way radio marketing and event rental radios. Very few businesses still use VHF Low Band, because most have gone to cell phones. So the handhelds, portables, or mobiles for it are cheap at flea markets, garage sales, and online auctions. Also, 49 MHz walkie talkies and headsets can be modified for this frequency by changing the crystals. Useful for patrols and tactical communications. All scanners can receive this channel.

LOWBAND VHF | LOW | 033.4000 FM | SHTF SURVIVAL
33.4 MHz is an ancient Low Band VHF FM itinerant business channel with a 1 watt limit. Popular among reenactors, survivalists, and bulletproof-radio enthusiasts using old military surplus manpacks or military handheld sets on this channel (especially PRC-77). The reason they use 33.4 is probably because it is the only low power itinerant channel that old green manpacks can select with their 50 kHz or 25 kHz channel spacing dials. At low power in the field, they aren't bothering anybody. Useful for patrols and tactical communications. All scanners can receive this channel.

HAM VHF | 6M | 051.0000 FM | HAM PREPPER SIMPLEX
51.0 MHz is a ham radio 6 meter FM simplex channel widely used by operators with all types of Low Band VHF military surplus radios. The frequency is compatible with normal ham radios and is not on a repeater channel. If military radio tone squelch (150 Hz) may be used, it is compatible with civilian radios PL 151.4 Hz. Useful for patrols and tactical communications. All scanners can receive this channel.

Some interesting older "green" military surplus radios common for Low Band VHF frequencies:
Military manpack set PRC-9, AN/PRC-9 (27.0-38.9 MHz FM) continuously tunable
Military manpack set PRC-10, AN/PRC-10 (38.0 to 54.9 MHz) continuously tunable
Military manpack set PRC-77, AN/PRC-77 (30-52.95; 53-75.95 MHz FM) channel spacing 50 kHz
Military manpack set PRC-25, AN/PRC-25 (30-52.95; 53-75.95 MHz FM) channel spacing 50 kHz
Military handheld set PRC-68, AN/PRC-68, PRC-68A, PRC-68B (30-79.975 MHz FM) channel spacing 50/25/12.5 kHz
Military handheld set RT-1547/PRC-126, AN/PRC-126 (30-88 MHz FM) channel spacing 25 kHz
Military handheld set AN/PRC-128 (30-88 MHz FM) channel spacing 12.5 kHz
Military manpack set AN/PRC-119 (30-87.95 MHz) channel spacing 25KHz
Military radio set AN/PRC-117 (30-90 MHz) channel spacing 25KHz

High Band VHF Frequencies:

LAND SAR VHF | SAR FM | 155.1600 FM | SEARCH & RESCUE
155.16 MHz FM Simplex is the (ground or land) SAR (Search And Rescue) National interoperability channel in USA. It is widely used by government and civilian SAR teams for field communications and interaction with governmental, law enforcement, or fire operations in the field. This channel is also known as SAR WFM or SAR NFM and it requires an FCC license to transmit on it. All scanners can receive this channel.

MARINE VHF | 16 | 156.8000 FM | SAFETY CALLING
156.800 MHz FM Simplex is VHF marine channel 16, the international primary Marine Safety, Emergency, and Distress guard channel worldwide. It is widely used and monitored by all boats, ships, and watercraft. All scanners can receive this channel.

MARINE VHF | 72 | 156.6250 FM | MARINE PREPPER
156.625 MHz FM Simplex is VHF marine channel 72, an international ship-to-ship or HT channel worldwide. It is widely used on boats, ships, and watercraft. It is designated for non-commercial use, is common for HT-to-HT informal communications, and is normally clear of commercial shipping or port operations. It is usually not monitored by coast guards. All scanners can receive this channel.

AIRCRAFT VHF | GUARD | 121.5000 AM | EMERGENCY DISTRESS
121.5 MHz AM is the Aircraft Emergency Frequency also known as the Guard Channel or International Air Distress (IAD) or VHF Guard. It is widely used and monitored by all aircraft, Air Traffic Control, defense aircraft, and towers. This was the primary crash beacon frequency for many years, up until newer 406 MHz UHF systems such as PLB, ELT or EPIRB emergency beacons became mandatory aboard aircraft in 2007. Transmissions on 121.5 MHz may bring teams of Search and Rescue authorities with direction finders looking for the transmitter. Some scanners can receive this channel.

HAM VHF | 2M | 146.5200 FM | HAM CALL SIMPLEX
146.52 MHz FM Simplex is widely known as the ham radio 2 meter Calling Frequency. It is the most widely monitored simplex frequency in USA, but it should not be depended upon for emergency 911 type calls, because there are no organized first-responders on it. It is the most likely local ham radio FM Simplex channel to be activated in SHTF scenarios, especially when infrastructure and repeaters are down. All scanners can receive this channel.

HAM VHF | 2M | 146.5500 FM | HAM PREPPER SIMPLEX*
146.55 MHz FM Simplex is one of very few ham radio 2 meter frequencies widely coordinated for FM-Simplex-only throughout USA. *It is the only 2 meter simplex channel compatible with bulletproof military surplus radios (AN/PRC-127, etc) and forest-fire radios (Bendix HTs, etc). These types of radios have 25kHz channel spacing, and are in wide use by ham radio survivalists/preppers. Useful for patrols and tactical communications. All scanners can receive this channel.

Reference source: List of 2 Meter 146 MHz Simplex Reality in USA
= 146.400 Repeaters all areas
= 146.415 Simplex (or Repeaters in some areas)
= 146.430 Simplex (or Repeaters in some areas)
= 146.445 Simplex (or Repeaters in some areas)
= 146.460 Simplex all areas
= 146.475 Simplex (or Repeaters in some areas)
= 146.490 Simplex (or Repeaters in some areas)
= 146.505 Simplex (or Repeaters in some areas)
= 146.520 National Simplex Calling
= 146.535 Simplex all areas
* 146.550 Simplex all areas
= 146.565 Simplex & T-hunts (or Repeaters in some areas)
= 146.580 Simplex all areas
= 146.595 Simplex (or Repeaters in some areas)
= 146.610 Repeaters all areas

* Compatible with Mil Surplus and Forest-Fire HTs using 25 kHz channel spacing

UHF Frequencies:

GMRS | 20 | 462.675+ FM | PL 141.3 REPEATER
462.675 MHz FM is recognized as the GMRS nationwide emergency and traveler assistance repeater channel. It is GMRS Channel 20 in the Motorola channel naming system and GMRS Channel 6 in the Icom/GM channel naming system. The repeater output is 462.675 MHz and uses a 5 MHz + split with an input frequency of 467.675 MHz and a PL 141.3 tone. Most scanners can receive this channel.

FRS | 3 | 462.6125 FM | PREPPER FRS
462.6125 MHz FM Simplex is FRS channel 3, it is commonly used for tactical patrols and neighborhood watch. It is an extremely short-range channel, but can be extended somewhat using GMRS radios that can also operate on this frequency or with simplex repeaters. FRS Channel 3 is on the channel list of several survivalist and prepper networks. Most scanners can receive this channel.

Ham HF SSB Frequencies:

HAM HF ----- | = 10M | 28.3050 USB | HAM PREPPER TECH
28.305 MHz USB is a ham radio Upper SideBand local and international frequency in the 10 meter band. In USA, it is widely available to Technician basic ham license (or higher) ham operators. This channel also is compatible with less-expensive 10-meter SSB channelized radios and extra-channel or modified CB SSB radios. HF SSB radios and military surplus manpack radios can transceive on this channel. Shortwave receivers with USB or BFO can receive this channel. Most scanners can not receive this channel due to the use of Single SideBand.

HAM HF | 20M | 14.2420 USB | HAM TAPRN
14.242 MHz USB is a ham radio Upper SideBand international and long distance frequency in the 20 meter band. In USA, it is only available to General license (or higher) ham operators. It is on the channel list of several organized survivalist and prepper networks, including TAPRN (The American Prepper Radio Network). HF SSB radios and military surplus manpack radios can transceive on this channel. Shortwave receivers with USB or BFO can receive this channel. Most scanners can not receive this channel due to the use of Single SideBand.

HAM HF | 40M | 7.2420 LSB | HAM TAPRN NET
7.242 MHz LSB is a ham radio Lower SideBand wide area frequency in the 40 meter band available to General license (or higher) operators in USA. It is on the channel list of several organized survivalist and prepper networks, including an active weekly net by TAPRN (The American Prepper Radio Network). HF SSB radios and some military surplus manpack radios can transceive on this channel. Shortwave receivers with LSB or BFO can receive this channel. Most scanners can not receive this channel due to the use of Single SideBand.

HAM HF | 60M | 5.3570 USB | HAM SHTF NVIS
5.357 MHz LSB is a ham radio Upper SideBand regional area frequency available to General license (or higher) operators in USA and other countries. The 5 MHz channels in the 60 meter band are recognized for use in EMCOMM Emergency Communications. This channel is optimum for long range mobile patrols and base NVIS (Near Vertical Incidence Skywave) HF communications dependably up to 500 miles on a regular daily basis. HF SSB radios and military surplus manpack radios can transceive on this channel. Shortwave receivers with USB or BFO can receive this channel. Most scanners can not receive this channel due to the use of Single SideBand.

HAM HF | 80M | 3.8180 LSB | HAM TAPRN NET
3.818 MHz LSB is a ham radio Lower SideBand night regional frequency in the 80 meter band available to General license (or higher) operators in USA. It is on the channel list of several survivalist and prepper networks, including an active weekly net by TAPRN (The American Prepper Radio Network). HF SSB radios and some military surplus manpack radios can transceive on this channel. Shortwave receivers with LSB or BFO can receive this channel. Most scanners can not receive this channel due to the use of Single SideBand.

CB Band and Freeband HF Frequencies:

CB AM | 3 AM | 26.9850 AM | PREPPER CB
26.985 MHz AM is CB Channel 3. Useful for common tactical patrols and local area communications between vehicles and bases. Channel 3 CB is on the channel list of several survivalist and prepper networks. Shortwave receivers can receive this channel. Some scanners can receive this channel.

CB AM | 9 AM | 27.0650 AM | EMERGENCY CB
27.065 MHz AM is CB Channel 9. In USA, the radio regulations designate this as the Emergency and Travelers' Assistance Channel in FCC rules 47CFR95.407(b). It is widely used by CBers during emergencies, but it should not be considered a 911 type channel because it is not reliably monitored by any first-responder organization. Some CB radios have a dedicated Channel 9 button. Shortwave receivers can receive this channel. Some scanners can receive this channel.

CB SSB | 36 USB | 027.3650 USB | SHTF SURVIVAL
27.365 MHz USB is CB Channel 36 Upper SideBand. Highly useful for long range patrols and wide local area communications, espeically between vehicles and bases up to about 20 miles. Channel 36 USB CB is on the channel list of several survivalist groups. Shortwave receivers with USB or BFO can receive this channel. Most scanners can not receive this channel due to the use of Single SideBand.

CB SSB | 37 USB | 027.3750 USB | PREPPER CB SSB
27.375 MHz USB is CB Channel 36 Upper SideBand. Highly useful for long range patrols and wide local area communications, especially between vehicles and bases up to about 20 miles. Channel 37 USB CB is a prepper listed frequency. Shortwave receivers with USB or BFO can receive this channel. Most scanners can not receive this channel due to the use of Single SideBand.

CB FREEBAND | 38 GAP | 027.3780 USB | SHTF SURVIVAL
27.378 MHz USB is a CB freeband Upper SideBand channel in the gap between CB channel 38 and CB channel 37. It is useful for long range patrols and wide local area communications, especially between vehicles and bases up to about 20 miles. This frequency is clearer due to less interference and has longer distance range than normal CB channels for SHTF groups using CB SSB radios with unlocked clarifier. Shortwave receivers with USB or BFO can receive this channel. Most scanners can not receive this channel due to the use of Single SideBand. More information about SHTF Survivalist Freeband CB SSB click here.

CB FREEBAND | E 2 HI | 027.4250 USB | SHTF SURVIVAL
27.425 MHz USB is a CB freeband Upper SideBand channel in extra channels, about 2 channels above normal CB channel 40. For CBs with extra channels in bands, it is channel 2 of the band just above normal CB band (usually Band E). It is useful for long range patrols and wide local area communications, especially between vehicles and bases up to about 20 miles. This frequency is clearer and has longer distance range than normal CB channels for SHTF survivalist groups using radios with extra upper high channels. Shortwave receivers with USB or BFO can receive this channel. Most scanners can not receive this channel due to the use of Single SideBand. More information about SHTF Survivalist Freeband CB SSB click here.
 

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I highly recommend more extensive of testing before wrapping it up and storing it.

Try it under different weather conditions, in different terrain, in different areas of your house, with partially dead batteries, etc. See what the crank and solar panel actually take to charge it. If it has stuff like options for plug in charging test that for how long it takes. If it can take earphones, use it with those to see how long it lasts.


You don't want to find out stuff in the field when you can know it before you store it.
 

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I have a AR-2800 Wide Range Monitor Scanner for keeping an ear out, specs:
Type (Wideband Receiver / Scanner), Brand (A O R), Model (AR-2800), Frequency Band(s) (HF), Channel Memory (1000 Channels), External power supply included. . Memory channels: 1000 aranged in 10 banks of 100.
1000 channels - 10 banks
500-600, 800-1300MHz range
Multiple steps of 5kHz and 12.5 kHz (5-995kHz)
AM, NFM, WFM, LSB, USB, CW
Scan rate 20cps
AF (audio frequency) Scan
Signal Meter
10 search banks
1 priority bank
Frequency range RX
0.5-600 / 800-1300 MHz (I have the one without the block from 600 to 800)
Tuning steps
5 kHz to 995 kHz in increments of 5 or 12.5 kHz
I have come to love this unit! Has SSB & BFO so really lie this one.
 

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Is this any good for charging an iPhone 4s? I notice a lot of these wind ups don't produce the power for charging smartphones.

It's essentially a Kaito KA-500 radio, such as you might find here:

http://www.campingsurvival.com/kaitoradioka500.html

I have that one, it's pretty good. I also have the KA-600, the Voyager Pro, which is better enough than the KA-500 that if you have to buy only the one, get the Voyager Pro.

My KA-500 is wrapped in foil and in my Faraday Cage. I also bought extra batteries for each.
 

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I'm thinking about picking up the Kaito (Degen) 1103. Anybody here have one, or any thoughts about it? Reviews seem really good.

It doesn't have solar or crank, but I figured we'd just stock up on batteries.
 

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Bazinga!
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Is the RadioShack 20-629 the equivalent of the SANGEAN ATS-505? They seam to have similar specs but is there a big difference in the quality and/or abilities?
I want to pick up a decent radio that has SSB, was thinking about the 20-629. Any suggestions for under $100?
 
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