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Discussion Starter #1
I have been thinking about getting an emergency generator for awhile now but not sure I can justify it. I live in an small neighborhood and the power is pretty stable. I only loose it every once in awhile for maybe a few hours. The longest outage has been a hurricane several years back for only about 2 days or so.
We had a bad winter last year, and got a lot of snow. It was so bad that you could not get out because the roads were not plowed for about 3 days. If I were to lose power it could have been difficult. The winter scenario is easier to deal with as far as the fridge, freezer and alt. heating sources, summer is a lot more difficult.
I am on a well and need power to get water. If I were to loose power in the summer I see water the top priority, then the fridge and freezer. I figure for a Generac 5500w generator, the trans. switch and wiring I should be able to get away with under 1000.00. I can afford it, if I need to, but realize it would only be needed a few times a year if that, and so I am unsure it is worth the money and effort? I would appreciate any wisdom the forum might have.....
 

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Christian Survivalist
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A buddy of mine said to me ......

As soon as there was a power outage and my family was in need of power, hot water, heat and it was a typical Idaho winter, well below freezing, I would pay 3 times as much, so why not do it now?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yes, an excellant point, I guess it's just hard parting with the cash. But it's just like insurance, "It sucks paying but if you ever need it, worth it's weight in gold."
 

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The end is,,,,,
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For average day to day "chance" you may need it. looks like you are going a bit overboard. Generac I like. They treat me good. But for a SHTF and you feel you may need that well then by all means, do it now while you can. You never know what the future may bring and you wont be able to set it up. If it was me, I would be all over it. Just make sure that it is something that you can easily keep fuiled up in case of a bad time. Like natural gas or LP. Generac can both that plus diesel. Hope I helped. Good luck.
 

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Christian Survivalist
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It happens every year. My buddy runs the local Platt Electric (wholesale and retail) outlet store. Every year, they can buy as many generators as they can, they sell every single one of them. Most of them are sold to the government as they buy every single one up. It pays to think ahead. It pays more to act ahead.
 

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Only you can justify the expense....I have used my genny only a couple of times also but it is nice knowing that if I need it, it is there ...plus you having to supply power to a well gives you more valid reasons than I have.... Some cranium chow here(food fer thought) you have firearms for defense and I bet you will use them less for their intended purpose than a genny.I hope this helps.
 

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Live Secret, Live Happy
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I've owned an emergency generator for 25 yrs now. Never needed it to power the house.

I use it to power high current load tools on remote work sites, it fits in my RV, I take it to the ranch where I have no line power.

I can even loan it out to my brother if he looses power.

They currently make generators with arc welder circuits, giving you a decent portable welder.

Don't forget that submersible pumps take 4-5 times their normal running current load when starting under load. Some of the better generators styles (like my 3000 watt yamaha) will produce a extra surge of power to supply that.
 

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I'm keeping my eye on you
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I consider my generator as a form of insurance. I didn't expect to be out of power for a week during a hurricane...but I was. The generator made life much nicer. I was supplying hot coffee to the neighbors each morning because no one else had one. If you get one, be sure to pull monthly maintenance on it and it won't let you down when you need it.
 

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I use mine at least twice a year, it is definitely a short-term item. You just can't store enough gas/diesel for the long term.

It's just nice to have for those times the electric goes out for 12 hours or a few days at a time. The longest for me was 7 days and other than the noise everything was normal
 

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Wayfinder
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The sweet-spot in generator pricing is at 6-Kilowatts. Above that point the price is much higher per kilowatt. So if you can live with 6-Kw, it's worth your while to do so. Generac doesn't make what I'd call an A-grade product. Not something that you could bet the farm on. Fuel-wise, gasoline doesn't store well and definitely requires an additive such as Pri-G to keep the fuel from degrading after six months. Currently produced diesel fuel is plagued with the growth of filter-clogging solids usually blamed on algae, but in reality is simply re-polymerization. My farmer brother-in-law actually has to change the slimy filters on his diesel tractor every month to keep it running. So don't believe people who say diesel is forever, it isn't. Only natural gas and propane last forever, and with natural gas you are at the mercy of the pipeline producer. If the SHTF the natural gas might cease to flow. So I bought myself a 12-Kw Honda tri-fuel generator (gasoline/NG/propane) and a 500-gallon tank of propane. I fire it up for one hour every month to keep the battery charged and verify its reliability. Top off the tank in August when propane costs the least. Gonna get a second 500-gallon tank this summer if the job holds out...
 

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The sweet-spot in generator pricing is at 6-Kilowatts. Above that point the price is much higher per kilowatt. So if you can live with 6-Kw, it's worth your while to do so. Generac doesn't make what I'd call an A-grade product. Not something that you could bet the farm on. Fuel-wise, gasoline doesn't store well and definitely requires an additive such as Pri-G to keep the fuel from degrading after six months. Currently produced diesel fuel is plagued with the growth of filter-clogging solids usually blamed on algae, but in reality is simply re-polymerization. My farmer brother-in-law actually has to change the slimy filters on his diesel tractor every month to keep it running. So don't believe people who say diesel is forever, it isn't. Only natural gas and propane last forever, and with natural gas you are at the mercy of the pipeline producer. If the SHTF the natural gas might cease to flow. So I bought myself a 12-Kw Honda tri-fuel generator (gasoline/NG/propane) and a 500-gallon tank of propane. I fire it up for one hour every month to keep the battery charged and verify its reliability. Top off the tank in August when propane costs the least. Gonna get a second 500-gallon tank this summer if the job holds out...



How many hours of power can you get with 500 gallons of LP gas?

<just curious>
 

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Wayfinder
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How many hours of power can you get with 500 gallons of LP gas?

A 500 gallon propane tank by law only contains 80% (400 gallons). If I run the generator at 100% power it consumes 1.25-Gallons/hour = 320 hours = 13.3 days. That's right, not even two weeks. More reasonably, I'd run it at 66% power (for lifespan reasons) over 8 hours/day. That equates to 60 days use. I also have a marine battery charger, six deep discharge batteries, and a 6-Kilowatt inverter that can run my deep well pump. That way I'll have running water and modest electrical power 24/7.
 

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Lux in Tenebris
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This post has caught my eye because i too, am looking at a genset, and have decided on the: ETQ Portable Propane Generator Now, I live in a suburban setting, and would use this only for the basics...I might have it wired into the house at some point, but not too concerned now...

The thing i like about it is that it runs off of # 20 tanks, and i am surrounded by lots of em in my community...when the gas stations cant pump gas because the grid is down, i can roll up and pay cash for their stock o tanks that sit outside the stations and grocery stores....

I would only run it when necesary 1-2 hrs a day max to conserver fuel and reduce exposure...Just my .002 cents worth...

I wish i could have a regular genest, but HOA rules don't allow it or a large tank...:mad:
 

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I have a small 6500 watt Makita - runs seven circuits on a manual transfer. But it provides heat downstairs, well, sump pump, fridge and some outlets. I ran it 4 days straight last winter. 5 gal gas gets me about 12 hrs - not to efficent. It was ok cause I was still able to drive about 3 miles or so and find a station with power still selling gas. Not good for wtshf. So I bought an older WINCO 10KW natural gas that I'm in the process of building a wood gas generator with it. Better long term, plenty of wood to run it and as long as it holds up I'll be able to make power.
 

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traveler
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i got a small 2500 watt unit just as insurance for the chest freezer.

i've never had to fire it up in an emergency situation, but i do use it on the farm. it has come in handy and since i don't see powering my whole house as a necessity it's plenty of power, and very portable.
 

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emergency generators...

I was married to an emergency generator for a number of years....She had to have been at least a 10kw emergency generator.

ColoMtnMan
 

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human
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I live very close to a small river and during spring melt our sump pumps (three total) have, at times run 24/7.
Shortly after we moved here I purchased a Generac 4kw gen. I've had it for almost 7 years and needed it twice, just for a few hours.
IF we didn't have the generator we could have lost our furnace and our hot water heater.

If your looking at generators I'd suggest BIGGER is better.
Make sure it has a oil filter!
You should wire in a transfer switch, they come in both auto and manual.
The autos get kinda pricey.
DON'T just wire it into your circuit/breaker box!
If you don't know how to do this then you must spend the bucks and have a electrician wire it in.

If you wire it in with out a transfer switch you could electrocute someone working on the power lines down the road. And, if the power company finds out they could disconnect you from the grid permanently!!
 
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