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Food Ingredient Cuisine Tableware Liquid

Inevitably, when your food supplies dwindle, so will your ability to follow cooking recipes. The following is a list of food substitutions that can be utilized to complete your ingredients for food preparation.

Substituting ingredients also change nutritional values. Be wary of using too many substitutes in a dish, as it may change both the taste and texture of the food.

Change the quantities of the substitution to accommodate your own palate and needs.

Layout is listed by 1. Ingredient, 2. Amount, and 3. Substitution

Dairy Products
Buttermilk
1 cup
1 tbsp vinegar or lemon juice plus enough milk to make 1 cup total, or 1 cup plain yogurt

Milk, whole
1 cup
1/2 cup evaporated milk plus 1/2 cup water, or 1/3 cup dry milk plus 1 cup water

Eggs, large
2 large eggs
3 small eggs

Egg (for baking)
1
1 tsp cornstarch plus 1/4 cup water

Egg
1 whole egg
2 egg yolks plus 1 tbsp water, or 1/4 cup egg substitute

Half and half
1 cup
7/8 cup milk plus 3 tbsp butter

Light cream
1 cup
2 tbsp butter plus enough milk to total one cup

Cream
1 cup
1/3 cup butter plus 3/4 cup milk

Sour Cream
1 cup
1 cup plain yogurt, or 7/8 cup buttermilk plus 3 tbsp butter

Yogurt, plain
equal
1 cup sour cream

Margarine or butter (for baking)
1 cup
1 cup hard shortening, or 7/8 cup vegetable oil

Shortening
equal
Butter or margarine

Asiago cheese
equal
Parmesan cheese

Ricotta cheese
equal
Cottage cheese
Baking Needs
Flour (for thickening)
1 tbsp1
1/2 tsp cornstarch, rice flour, or tapioca

Self rising flour
1 cup
1 cup all-purpose flour plus 1 1/2 tsp baking powder and 1/2 tsp salt

Cake flour
1 cup
1 cup minus 2 tbsp all-purpose flour

Baking mix (like Bisquick)
1 cup
1 cup flour plus 1 1/2 tsp baking powder plus 1/2 tsp salt plus 3 tbsp solid shortening

Tapioca
1 tbsp
1 1/2 tbsp all-purpose flour

Cornstarch
1 tbsp
2 tbsp all-purpose flour

Sugar
1 cup
1 cup honey but reduce liquid in recipe by 1/2 cup

Powdered (confectioner鈥檚) sugar
1 cup
1 cup sugar plus 1 cup cornstarch mixed in food processor

Light brown sugar
1 cup
1 cup granulated sugar plus 2 tbsp molasses

Dark brown sugar
1 cup
3/4 cup of granulated sugar plus 1/4 cup molasses

Palm sugar
equal
Maple sugar, or brown sugar blended with maple syrup to moisten

Honey
1 cup
1 1/4 cups sugar plus 1/4 cup water

Molasses
equal
1 cup honey

Corn syrup
1 cup
2/3 cup sugar plus 1/3 cup hot water and cool to room temperature before using

Chocolate, semisweet
1 oz
1 oz unsweetened chocolate plus 1 tbsp sugar, or 3 tbsp chocolate chips

Chocolate, semisweet chips
1/2 cup
3 oz semisweet chocolate

Chocolate, unsweetened
1 oz
3 tbsp unsweetened cocoa plus 1 tbsp margarine or oil

Vinegar
1 tsp
2 tsp lemon juice

Yeast, active dry
1 packet
2 1/2 tsp dry yeast ,or 1/3 cake yeast crumbled

Baking powder
1 tsp
1/4 tsp baking soda plus 1/2 tsp cream of tartar

Oil
1 cup
1/2 lb butter, or 1 cup melted shortening, or 1 cup melted margarine

Bread crumbs
1 cup
3/4 cup cracker crumbs
Seasonings and Flavorings
Herbs, fresh
1 tbsp
1 tsp dried herb of same type

Herbs, dried
1 tsp
1 tbsp of same herb fresh

Garlic
1 clove
1/8 tsp garlic powder or minced dried garlic

Vanilla bean
1 inch
1 tsp vanilla extract

Allspice, ground
1 tsp
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon and 1/2 tsp ground cloves

Mustard (prepared)
1 tbsp
1 tsp dry mustard

Pumpkin pie spice
1 tsp
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon plus 1/4 tsp ground ginger plus 1/8 tsp ground allspice plus 1/8 tsp ground nutmeg

Italian seasoning
3 tsp
1 tsp oregano plus 1 tsp basil plus 1 tsp sage

Saffron
1/8 tsp
1/2 tsp tumeric

Onion
1 small onion
1 tsp onion powder, or 1 tbsp minced dried onion re-hydrated

Lemon, fresh juice
1 medium lemon
2-3 tbsp bottled lemon juice

Lemon juice
1 tsp
1/2 tsp vinegar

Lemon peel
1 tsp
1/2 tsp lemon extract

Lemon grass
equal
Grated lemon zest mixed with a bit of fresh lemon juice

Orange, fresh juice
1 medium orange
1/4 to 1/3 cup orange juice

Amaretto
2 tbsp
1/4 to 1/2 tsp almond extract

Sherry
2 tbsp
1 to 2 tsp vanilla extract

Marsala
1/4 cup
1/4 cup dry wine plus 1 tsp brandy

White wine
equal
White grape juice or apple juice

Red wine
1/4 cup
1 tbsp balsamic or red wine vinegar

Tomato sauce
2 cups
3/4 cup tomato paste plus 1 cup water

Tomato juice
1 cup
1/2 cup tomato sauce plus 1/2 cup water

Tomatoes, canned
1 cup
Simmer 1 1/3 cup fresh tomato wedges for 10 minutes

Cocktail sauce
1 cup
1 cup ketchup plus 2 tbsp horseradish (or to taste)

Ketchup
1 cup
1 cup tomato sauce plus 1/4 cup sugar plus 2 tbsp vinegar
 

Large Caliber Man
Joined
414 Posts
View attachment 390040
Inevitably, when your food supplies dwindle, so will your ability to follow cooking recipes. The following is a list of food substitutions that can be utilized to complete your ingredients for food preparation.

Substituting ingredients also change nutritional values. Be wary of using too many substitutes in a dish, as it may change both the taste and texture of the food.

Change the quantities of the substitution to accommodate your own palate and needs.

Layout is listed by 1. Ingredient, 2. Amount, and 3. Substitution

Dairy Products


Baking Needs


Seasonings and Flavorings
Great stuff, thanks for posting this!
 

Registered
Joined
4,743 Posts
Good topic. There are probably lots more, maybe someone could find more in a depression-era or wartime cookbook?
The above info is certainly useful, but it's also the kind of basic knowledge many, many cooks used to have. Try any real general cookbook (versus those that are just a collection of recipes). Joy of Cooking among others will provide tons of info on ingredients/equivalents and substitutions.

Certainly cookbooks from the eras of wartime rationing will also have some interesting recipes for when you are out of a number of basics and can't get more or have only very limited quantities to work with, but a good basic cookbook with an extensive discussion of ingredients and techniques will cover much of the info needed to develop those recipes. A well-thumbed copy of one ought to be in everyone's kitchen..

As I and others have said here repeatedly, learn to cook from scratch. It's a basic and highly useful survival skill.
 

Forum Administrator
Joined
6,501 Posts
The above info is certainly useful, but it's also the kind of basic knowledge many, many cooks used to have. Try any real general cookbook (versus those that are just a collection of recipes). Joy of Cooking among others will provide tons of info on ingredients/equivalents and substitutions.

Certainly cookbooks from the eras of wartime rationing will also have some interesting recipes for when you are out of a number of basics and can't get more or have only very limited quantities to work with, but a good basic cookbook with an extensive discussion of ingredients and techniques will cover much of the info needed to develop those recipes. A well-thumbed copy of one ought to be in everyone's kitchen..

As I and others have said here repeatedly, learn to cook from scratch. It's a basic and highly useful survival skill.

Yep. In this age of finding good recipes online in an instant, many of the younger folks do not have a single cookbook, let alone a good one.
They make excellent gifts and we have given some great cookbooks to our younger kinfolk. They all loved them and use them.

Great thread topic. I even made it into a Featured Thread that is posted on the home page.
 

Super Moderator
Trash Remover
Joined
4,870 Posts
Yep. In this age of finding good recipes online in an instant, many of the younger folks do not have a single cookbook, let alone a good one.
They make excellent gifts and we have given some great cookbooks to our younger kinfolk. They all loved them and use them.

Great thread topic. I even made it into a Featured Thread that is posted on the home page.
(y)
 

Registered
Joined
4,743 Posts
Yep. In this age of finding good recipes online in an instant, many of the younger folks do not have a single cookbook, let alone a good one.
I absolutely love being able to troll the internet for recipes/inspiration for making just about anything, but if all you know to do is find and follow a recipe, you have not really learned how to cook. (And that goes double if your "recipes" mostly consist of nothing more than combine a can of this with a packet of that and a box of the other convenience foods)

Get the basics of ingredients and techniques and rules under your belt, and you are then in a position to tell a good recipe from a poor one, judge what a recipe will taste like just by reading it, put together your own dishes without reference to any specific recipe, or figure out how to successfully modify a recipe or combine several to suit your personal tastes or what you have on hand. (And if you are absolutely wedded to some prepared/convenience food, it will even give you the knowledge to come up with a reasonable copycat when that product isn't available.)
 

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