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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Wife and I are planning on buying an electric incinerating toilet. It burns up whatever goes in, and you have a little bit of ash to throw away later.

It needs a dedicated 115 VAC, 20 amp circuit. So I’m figuring a couple 12 volt deep cycle batteries and an inverter. I guess I need to size the inverter to the power requirements of the fixture? I think my inverter is 3000 watts.

I don’t want a $2000 electric toilet I can’t power up. I guess I could start the generator whenever I need to cycle the toilet.
 

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5hey use 2 kwh's per "flush". That would be 4 golf cart batteries drained per use.

Peak power draw is 2400 watts and a cycle takes 1 1/2 hours.

A incinerator toilet is a poor choice for off grid. I wouldn't want to ron a generator for 1 1/2 hours every time you want to flush.

Also most portable inverters cant handle their rated watts for any real length of time.

If you want an off grid toilet that doesnt use water your best option may be an outhouse or composting toilet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Lasers, I clicked “Like” but not really.

Krap. Can’t have an outhouse, the spring is right down the hill from the cabin. Can’t burn the contents, there’s an open fire ban 4 or 5 months every year.
 

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There are also propane, natural gas and diesel powered crap cookers. All three of these tend to be a little easier at generating heat than electricity. In terms of their general use, I have a friend in NC who installed one in a building in the rear of her property. It saved her $3,500 vs the cost of extending the sewer, etc. She was very pleased with the way it worked. She has had it 10 years without one issue.
 

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Wife and I are planning on buying an electric incinerating toilet. It burns up whatever goes in, and you have a little bit of ash to throw away later.

It needs a dedicated 115 VAC, 20 amp circuit. So I’m figuring a couple 12 volt deep cycle batteries and an inverter. I guess I need to size the inverter to the power requirements of the fixture? I think my inverter is 3000 watts.

I don’t want a $2000 electric toilet I can’t power up. I guess I could start the generator whenever I need to cycle the toilet.
The easiest toilets to maintain are the old ones, the ones made before anyone cared about gallons per flush. If you can find one of them, you're set for pre-SHTF. The fact that they use more water causes your home to require less plumbing maintenance.

For post-SHTF, that guy talking about generator time/flush sounds on point. I don't know much about electricity but it sounds like he does. Probably best to stick with an outhouse, maybe keep the feces as fertilizer. As long as it doesn't touch the actual food it's fine.

You can grow food in septic field. Just make sure it's not root veg.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The easiest toilets to maintain are the old ones, the ones made before anyone cared about gallons per flush. If you can find one of them, you're set for pre-SHTF. The fact that they use more water causes your home to require less plumbing maintenance.

For post-SHTF, that guy talking about generator time/flush sounds on point. I don't know much about electricity but it sounds like he does. Probably best to stick with an outhouse, maybe keep the feces as fertilizer. As long as it doesn't touch the actual food it's fine.

You can grow food in septic field. Just make sure it's not root veg.
Yeah, he might have talked me out of an electric system. A septic system would be pretty tricky, very rocky and steep and heavily forested.
 

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Yeah, he might have talked me out of an electric system. A septic system would be pretty tricky, very rocky and steep and heavily forested.
That's a bit of a problem. You can't just be defecating everywhere randomly. So there probably are not a lot of potential outhouse placement areas? Sounds like that's the case.

At this point I have to stop trying because I can't see the land. You are in a bit of a pickle but it can be resolved.
 

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Is there such a thing as organic cat litter?

Use a five gallon bucket?
 
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Lasers, I clicked “Like” but not really.

Krap. Can’t have an outhouse, the spring is right down the hill from the cabin. Can’t burn the contents, there’s an open fire ban 4 or 5 months every year.
I would look into a composting toilet. That is what we are using for the house I am building. Building code requires a "ceriified " composting toilet that costs $1800. I bought one second hand and intend to install it in an outbuilding to satasify the inspector. I intend to actually use a homemade one that amounts to a bucket of damp sawdust in a vented cabinet.

We have used one in the past. I would pourpsly abuse it to see just how carefully it had to be maintained. The only time it ever stunk was when we use bone dry planer shavings instead of damp sawdust.

We actually have an unvented one set up in our basement as an emergency second bathroom.

Every so often,daily to a few times a year, depending on use, it needs to be dumped into a covered compost pile where it is allowed to break down for a couple years.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Those bags with some kind of chemical powder in the bottom. They fit on a little portable camping toilet chair. When one is full enough, you ziploc it closed and throw it away. I just throw them in our dumpster, and the trash guys haul them away when they empty the dumpster. They haven’t beat me up yet, so the bags must not break open or leak!

It‘s no big deal for me, pee on a tree or dig a cat hole back in the woods somewhere. Not that great when it’s 5 degrees outside. Wife sure hates the bag method, though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I would look into a composting toilet. That is what we are using for the house I am building. Building code requires a "ceriified " composting toilet that costs $1800. I bought one second hand and intend to install it 9n an outbuilding to satasify the inspector. I intend to actually use a homemade one that amounts to a bucket of damp sawdust in a vented cabinet.

We have used one in the past. I would pourpsly abuse it to see just how carefully it had to be maintained. The only time it ever stunk was when we use bone dry planer shavings instead of damp sawdust.

We actually have an unvented one set up in our basement as an emergency second bathroom.

Every so often,daily to a clue times a year, depending on use, it needs to be dumped into a covered compost pile where it is allowed to break down for a couple years.
Sawdust? How about chainsaw chips, I wonder? I got plenty of those.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Hah! There’s an ANSI standard for composting toilets! Those guys are into everything.
 

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Sawdust? How about chainsaw chips, I wonder? I got plenty of those.
That may be a bit course but give it a try. I own a bandsaw mill so I have literal tons of damp sawdust. So that is what I use. If chainsaw chips dont work, dirt does. I dont use dirt because 6 months out of the year it is frozen and the othe 6 it is too wet. The decomposing sawdust piles produce enough of their own heat that I can usually break the outer crust on the winter to get at non frozen sawdust below.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
That may be a bit course but give it a try. I own a bandsaw mill so I have literal tons of damp sawdust. So that is what I use. If chainsaw chips dont work, dirt does. I dont use dirt because 6 months out of the year it is frozen and the othe 6 it is too wet. The decomposing sawdust piles produce enough of their own heat that I can usually break the outer crust on the winter to get at non frozen sawdust below.
Well, they’re chips when I sharpen my chains as often as I should. Sometimes I just get dust.

Some of the composting toilet sites talk about peat moss and other stuff. But I guess 50 pounds of peat moss don’t cost much.
 

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Well, they’re chips when I sharpen my chains as often as I should. Sometimes I just get dust.

Some of the composting toilet sites talk about peat moss and other stuff. But I guess 50 pounds of peat moss don’t cost much.
The one I bought second hand uses peat moss and some powder. And instead of emptying and letting the composting happen in a pile the composting is supposed to happen in the chamber that you empty once a year or so. It is very easy to overwhelm it with urine. And its method of emptying is quite messy unless you uninstall the entire toilet and take it outside to empty. I much prefer the bucket and sawdust method. But nobody make thousands of dollars from a bucket so it isnt approved.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
The one I bought second hand uses peat moss and some powder. And instead of emptying and letting the composting happen in a pile the composting is supposed to happen in the chamber that you empty once a year or so. It is very easy to overwhelm it with urine. And its method of emptying is quite messy unless you uninstall the entire toilet and take it outside to empty. I much prefer the bucket and sawdust method. But nobody make thousands of dollars from a bucket so it isnt approved.
Well, appreciate your advice. Gonna have to change my plan.

Too good to be true, plug it in, throw a switch, magically get a tray of powdery gray ash.
 
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