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I've tried a few different types of tents when I've been camping, and I manage to screw it up every time. Can someone suggest a reasonably sturdy tent that is stupidly simple to put up?

Any tent that requires me to bend its poles is out, as I've broken more than one tent pole trying to put those up.

Preferably something big enough for at least 2 people.
 

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BEEN HERE TO LONG
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maybe you should get someone else to put up your tent.anyway welcome from tennessee.
 

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Here's Johnny!
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I've tried a few different types of tents when I've been camping, and I manage to screw it up every time ... Preferably something big enough for at least 2 people.
What are you doing to your tent to screw it up? :confused:

Recreational Equipment, Inc.rei.com has several light weight 2-man tents if you're looking to cut down on pack weight. I'm also a fan of sierradesigns.com.
 

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I like my little French military tent. It only takes about 2 or 3 minutes to put up. I've got a nice dome tent also, but it is alot more dificult to set up at night, trying to thread those 10 foot long poles through thier channels in the fabric can really try your patients in the dark.
 

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I know that this is an older thread, but I thought I might have a useful idea. It's a bit rough, but I LOVE my "pup" tent. The old army tents that've been out of use for a long while but are still sold in just about every surplus store are great. It was $30 at my local army surplus store (I'm sure it could have been cheaper online). It's easy to set up and really unbreakable. The tent itself is in 2 halves that you simply snap together, place 2 poles (that come in 3 part sections you stick into eachother) at each end and stake down the sides. It's easy to set up, quick, and can be very adaptable to different circumstances.

Paul
 

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I have one from cabelas that is like a teepee but with a square bottom , one center pole it comes in 3 sizes 8' 1o' 12 ' and get taller with each size . I have the 10 ' you stake out the corners then put up the pole and stake out the guy lines it sheds wind and rain very well.
 

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I have forgone any tents the last 5 years for a debris hut. Of course I only build on should I think it is needed otherwise I just sleep in a sleeping bag on a pad on the open forest floor. Anyone else go this primitive route???

 

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For car camping, mushing overnighters, horsepacking and canoeing, I am really into "pyramid tents" one pole designs, with stove jacks. It takes camping to a new level!
They are made in all kindza materials.

 

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I have one from cabelas that is like a teepee but with a square bottom , one center pole it comes in 3 sizes 8' 1o' 12 ' and get taller with each size . I have the 10 ' you stake out the corners then put up the pole and stake out the guy lines it sheds wind and rain very well.
Yeah...thats the ticket...the pyramid tent
 

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11B3P
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I have forgone any tents the last 5 years for a debris hut. Of course I only build on should I think it is needed otherwise I just sleep in a sleeping bag on a pad on the open forest floor. Anyone else go this primitive route???

Nice hooch.
I like to sleep in the open but I usually set up the old fashioned Army poncho hooch with bungee cords to keep the dew off of me.
 

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read the instrutions.. i bought a cheap tent and untill i read them i couldnt put it up because for this tent you set the out side up then hang the inside from it kind of weird and not easy to setup i still rather use my old beaten up tent its in really rough shape but works well
 

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Kibitzer
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I know that this is an older thread, but I thought I might have a useful idea. It's a bit rough, but I LOVE my "pup" tent.
Paul
Yep, but on another thread, everyone says it's a POS. No floor, heavy, leaks, pain to set up, no floor. But, hey, I've got one. The kids loved to camp out in the back yard with it. But, I collect USGI surplus, so I had to get one.

I've got a round bag, that has a tent inside. You pull it out, throw it in the air, step back as it unfolds to a two person tent. All you do is stake it out and unzip the doors to get inside and sleep. But, it's a pain to fold back up to fit back into bag. I keep it behind the RV sofa in case of company that wants to spend the night.

I saw a tent on a site that used an umbrella style pole inside to set up fast.
 

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trois pour cent
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I've got a Northface VE 25 that I've had since the 80's. Still a great tent and easy to use. Just a little heavy at around 10 lbs as compared to newer stuff. And I've never broken a pole with set up. Very easy.

Also have a Mountain Hardware Skyledge. It's pretty light, well ventilated, easy to set up.

I also have a Mountain Hardware Trango. Bought it second hand. Very sturdy and easy to set up. My only complaint there is it's a little too tight and gets a lot of condensation in cold weather. Too hot for the south in summer.

All of those, easy to set up. Never never had a pole break on any of them.
 

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i have a nice tent from sierra designs. super easy to set up you just assemble the poles and hook them through tabs on each corner of the tent. then there are clips all along the tent that just clip to the poles. takes me <5 minutes to set it up by myself and it is a 3 person tent. Light enough to take backpacking also at ~7lbs
 

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i've lived in my dome tent with a good rain fly for up to 45 days at a time while treking years ago when i was lucky enough to have the time and the freedom to do so...man i miss those days.

these days i am a fan of a good quality hammock and a hammock tent...get my body off of the ground..away from the moisture or any moisture that may come or settle there and of course the creepy crawlies. but then again the longest trips away from society i've been able to squeeze in for pleasure over the last 3 yrs has been 7 days...i am not sure i could do 45 in a hammock.

sadly and sorry to say that with all of the out of town and country working i have been doing and a demanding lady friend most of my "roughing it" lately has been staying in hotels that do not include a mint on the pillow at night and that do not offer room service...sad truly sad. but if i'm going camping i'm going alone and right now i'm enjoying the 'benefits' of female company...i guess i'm stuck with hotel camping for now
 

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re: ez tents

its not the best for 2 person, depending on the size of the 2 but can be done. this is probably the best outdoor product that i have ever purchased. (no i dont have affiliation with them)

http://hennessyhammock.com/catalogue.html

i have the explorer ultralite and it is attached externally to my pack along with my snugpak (both less than 6lbs combined weight). fast setup, faster take down.

and u will sleep better than you ever would in any tent.
 

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Carpe diem
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Carinthia Observer (with 3 layer Gore-Tex)

The OBSERVER is the perfect sniper Bivy Bag with self-standing double pole support. Two tent poles form a small dome at the head end which provides enough space for the user to handle a rifle or other piece of equipment. The Bivy Bag slopes down from the shoulder to the foot end, thus preventing straight lines which are easily spotted. The L-shaped opening makes it convenient to get into and out of the bag which can be closed with two zippers. All zippers are protected by a specially designed storm flap to make them absolutely waterproof. The big observation opening at the front allows an observation range of 180° and can be closed completely in bad weather. The user’s rifle and telescope can nevertheless still be placed in position through an observation slit. Both the observation opening and the access opening are fitted with a mosquito net. There are five loops on the back of the Observer to hold the insulating mat in place.

This Tent has the revolutionary gas permeable Gore-Tex Best Defense laminate as their top material. The material is absolutely waterproof, windproof and vapour permeable – the well-known properties of Gore-Tex laminates. What’s new is that the new laminate is also gas permeable. That means that the Bivy Bag can be closed completely without having to keep ventilation slit open for fresh air. The fresh air permeates through the material itself.

The warmed air stays inside the Bivy Bag resulting in a much better insulation effect. When the outside temperature is –10 °C, for example, the air temperature inside the head are is +3 °C.

In really bad weather and precipitation the Bivy Bag can be closed completely and remains absolutely waterproof.

Material: 3-layer highly water-proof and cold-flex durable Gore-Tex laminate. This fabric is IR-Remission. :thumb:



Color: green (olive RAL 7013)

Upright: 240 x 75 cm (94.49 x 29.53 inch) and the height off the cupola is 60 cm (23.62 inch)

Pack Size: 35 x 12 cm (13.78 x 4.72 inch)

Weight: 1800 gram (3.97 pound)
 

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free man
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+1 on the floorless.

Betamid. 2.2 pounds. Just stake out 4 corners...throw you and your pack underneith..prop up your 2 trekking poles... Done! Instant 4 season performance.





Or not so 4 season.. :)


Or the Teepee design. Both work awesome. Floorless gives the most floorspace for the weight and bulk carried. Period.




Subdued? I'd prolly use this waterproof breathable singlewall tent. Simple 2 pole wedge=goes up in about 2 minutes..full on mtneering performance..4.5lbs. Expensive tho.


 
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