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Discussion Starter #1
The correct term would be camp oven cooking. The cast iron pot with the three legs and recessed lid.
Does anyone here do any camp oven cooking?

After joining this forum, I was thinking, I have a nice collection of Lodge Camp Oven cast iron cookware.....I have over the many years have cooked gormet meals in my cast iron.

I can say that I can do anything in my camp oven than anyone else in a regular house oven. So, I pulled out my 12 quart DO and noticed it's been many years since I used it. ???:eek:
It was covered in dust!! Had to clean it very good and gave it a good coat of oil to keep the iron in good shape.

All my cast iron would be the the best by far for cooking in any situation...

Is anyone here familure with this type of cooking?

thanks

dan
 

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Deus exsisto laus
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I rid my family of aluminum cookware decades ago. I set off to replace everything with Lodge ironware. I have a 12 inch Do that I am learning to use. So far , so good. Once you learn how to do it , you can do just about anything with it. TP
 

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I just made an apple cobbler today for the kids LOL I got into it not too long ago thru the cubscouts. I am learning as much as I can as I took a 2 hour class on dutch oven cooking a month ago. The best food I've had in a very long time. I plan to start buying all the lodge cast I can so I can start teaching myself more. Got a cd in the mail from our teacher from the scouts with 1000 recipes. Cant wait to get it.
 

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One thing I have loved over my last 10 years in the boy scouts, has been cooking with dutch ovens. I have cooked everything from pizza's to stews and everything in between. By far my favorite thing to cook in one is cobblers. My favorites being blueberry and apple. I learned how to make them from one of our scout leaders who had perfected the recipe, even how many charcoal briskets to put on each side, it comes out perfect. Better than anything you can get at a store. Now that I have aged out and am a leader, I get to focus on teacher the other scouts these things.
 

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I've got two dutch ovens and love cooking in them; specifically baking. Baking a cake while camping was always a hit when the kids were small. I've done stews, roasts, rice, just about all of it. I even entered a cooking competition on a 1800's period estate and won making a cake in the dutch oven while everybody else was roasting and grilling. Controlling the heat is the biggest key. I've always used charcoal but would like to try with wood. I used to bake on backpacking stoves using a small flame underneath and a "twiggy fire" on top of the lid. Fresh bread while backpacking can be a big morale booster.
 

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Love Lodge Cast Iron, most of the rest are made in China with who knows what.
I see in some pics that people use aluminum foil, we don't, we use parchment paper for our dessert baking.
The best stuff to season cast iron with is Crisco solid shortning (very lightly).
Remember clockwise rotate entire DO a 1/4 turn and counter clockwise the lid 1/4 turn every 10-15 mins., helps to cook-bake evenly. The lid should look like you never moved it (think about it).
 

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human
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I have been using Black Iron pots for a number of (+40) years. It might sound a bit against some of the posts but I've retired my Lodge brand pots for antique pots/pans I've purchased over the years.
My antique dutch oven (was rusted when purchased) cleaned easily with steel wool and elbow grease then cycled it heating/oil/heating/oil/wash/heat/oil.

It has no markings on it but it's inside is glass smooth and almost "non-stick"
It weighs just over a pound heavier than the Lodge brand. And no matter how much "polishing" the Lodge brand would never achieve the smoothness of the no-brand antique. If you look at it with a stitch magnifying glass you can see that the cast is porous compared to the antique.

I found the same thing to be true with my 12 inch skillet/fry pan. My no name antique is much smoother and heavier than my Lodge brand.


In both cases the lids are heavier and seal better. Both lids (on the inside) have the nips/bumps that causes the steam vapor to drip in a uniform pattern on the surface, where as my Lodge lids did not have these.
Although someone told me that his Lodge lids have them too.

It might sound strange and have no importance to "cooking and flavor" but my old iron will hold a magnet tighter than any of the "newer" pots and pans.

An old time mechanic told me that the "new iron" doesn't compare to "the old stuff" I had thought he was crazy, but now I'm not too sure.

But, getting back to cooking ... I prefer the flavor of any dish cooked in black iron.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Cast iron, black iron....some call it Black Magic!!

Here is 2 cornish game hens!!! Hmmmmm good!!
I have a smaller dutch oven that can fit 4 apples in perfect, cored, with butter, raisens and cinimonimin (sp? whatever)

good stuff yes indeed....

dan

My brother in law has a cast iron skillet he got from his mother. At first I thought it was polished stainless steel!! His mother cleaned it with steel wool after each use, so now, it looks like SS, at least on the inside.

Works great for searing up some duck breasts!!!! hmmm!! duck boobies!!!

dan
 

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Come and Take It!
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The correct term would be camp oven cooking. The cast iron pot with the three legs and recessed lid.
Does anyone here do any camp oven cooking?
I don't know where the name "camp oven" came from. The original Ductch ovens used on American Hearths all had feet and the lipped lids this is what distinguished them from cast iron pots. In recent years they took the feet off the bottom and the lip off the lid so the Dutch oven could be used in a conventional modern stove/oven.

After joining this forum, I was thinking, I have a nice collection of Lodge Camp Oven cast iron cookware.....I have over the many years have cooked gormet meals in my cast iron.

I like to stack my Dutch ovens not possible unless they have the lipped lid and feet. I have a set for my conventional stove/oven too.

I can say that I can do anything in my camp oven than anyone else in a regular house oven. So, I pulled out my 12 quart DO and noticed it's been many years since I used it. ???:eek:

It is a Dutch Oven....Please!

It was covered in dust!! Had to clean it very good and gave it a good coat of oil to keep the iron in good shape.

All my cast iron would be the the best by far for cooking in any situation...

Is anyone here familure with this type of cooking?

thanks

dan
Dan I love Dutch oven cooking and cooking with cast iron ingeneral whether on a hearth, stove/oven or campfire. The misnomer that it is or should be called a camp-oven is a modern change to the lexicon. REAL Dutch Ovens should have feet on the bottom and a lip on the lid.

There are many good threads for dutch oven cooking in this forum.
 

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Sky Soldier
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I bought Dutch oven years ago and cooked elk stew in it once, I burnt one half of the stew and the other half was mush I figured the Dutch oven just wasn’t for me. I didn’t even bother cleaning the oven it sat for a while and eventually was relegated the back of a shelf in a storage shed.
2005 I was camping in a state park and attended a Dutch Oven cooking class mainly for the samples. The couple that instructed the class cooked as they talked and had 8 ovens going before it was all over. The simple way they conveyed the possibilities inspired me to try it again. I pull my old rust and dust covered oven out and decided to give ovens a try again.

That class that rekindled my interest in Dutch Ovens changed cooking for me it offer me option which I never considered. I became a little Dutch Oven happy after that, buying more ovens, accessories and I cooked in the oven every chance I got for a while.



This recipe is from Byron Dutch Oven Recipe's

Pineapple Upside Down Cake
Topping Cake Batter
4 Tbs. butter 1 yellow cake mix
1 cup brown sugar 1 cup pineapple juice
8 pineapple rings 1/3 cup water
8 maraschino cherries 3 eggs
1/3 cup oil

Prepare Cake Topping: Melt butter in bottom of a 12" Dutch oven. Sprinkle brown sugar evenly over butter being careful not to touch the sugar once it has begun to dissolve into the butter. Carefully place pineapple rings on top of the brown sugar, 7 around the outside and 1 in the center. Place a maraschino cherry in the center of each pineapple ring.

Prepare Cake Batter: In a mixing bowl combine cake mix, pineapple juice, water, eggs and oil; mix well. Spoon cake batter carefully over the top of pineapple rings. Spread batter evenly to edges.

Bake: Cover Dutch oven and bake usinge 10-12 briquettes bottom and 14-16 briquettes top for 45 minutes or until top of cake springs back when touched.

Let the cake cool for 10 minutes or so in the oven with the lid cracked. Next run a rubber spatula around the inside edge of the oven to loosen the cake. To turn the cake out, first lay a piece of parchment paper across the top of the oven so it lays flat and replace the lid so that it holds the paper in place. Make sure you have an available lid stand resting on your table for the next step. Using gloved hands place one hand on the lid and the other hand under the oven and carefully lift and flip the oven over so the cake falls onto the lid. Rest the oven upside down on the lid stand and tap the bottom and sides of the oven lightly with your hand to make sure the cake didn't stick. Then lift the oven off the lid. The cake will be resting on the parchment lined lid and can be cooled this way or slid off the lid using the parchment paper. Allow cake to cool slightly before service.

Serve with vanilla ice cream or whipped cream as topping.

Serves: 8-10
 

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Sky Soldier
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Pheasant and Wildrice


Get a Pheasant. Rabbit or Chicken can also be used.

Bread and Fry, I bread with cracker crumbs flour, salt, pepper with a little poutry spice. To get breading to stick dedge in a mixture of water and eggs or milk and eggs.


Frying in oven with a little oil or shortening, this isnt a complete fry jst the outside, drain oil or juices.



add wildrice, mushroom, little onions, heavy cream, a little water (most wild rice has to be boiled and rinsed a couple times) I buy the canned wildrice for this recipe.



Bake until done.
For Charcoal cooking -if you use the SIZE number of your oven and double it that is your total number of coals needed to achieve 350*F, now move three coals from the bottom to the top (Example 12 qt D.O. x 2 = 24 coals total for the top and bottom, now move three for the bottom to the top. So that 15 coal on top and 9 on the bottom to achieve 350*f oven on a normal temperate day. Be sure you bring your coals to the outside edge. I put 3 coal between each leg and 15 around the outside of the lid. Adjust as coal shrink or if you are browning meat of frying. I away add a couple in the center top and bottom while browning.



It tastes way better than it looks in the Dutch Oven. this can be done on a range and in household oven with regular stuff also. As far as what you call your Dutch Oven I don't care what you call it.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I always called it Dutch Oven, but on an RV thread this one person, kept correcting me and everyone else on the board that the correct name is Camp Oven......personally I could care less. I have both as well and they will last forever.

Being exposed to the elements and cooking dinner in one of these can really taste great!!!!

dan
 
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